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The above command should not require internet access. dpkg simply installs deb files given to it.


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apt-get installs the package you ask for, and any packages which it depends on which you don't already have, and any packages they depend on, and any packages they depend on, and so on. It is possible to replicate this offline but it's a bit of a pain - at least, I don't know of an easy way. If you can find a way to get the Pi connected to the internet, ...


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You can download deb files on your laptop and move them to your Raspberry on a USB stick. Or connect your RPi to your laptop (with a cat5 cable) and use "internet connection sharing" on Windows to get the Raspberry online. Unless you are located somewhere where you're off the grid.


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Raspberry Pi does not use a structured boot loader like grub or lilo or usable U-boot and Berryboot. It is seen as an embedded system and typical for this the boot procedure is very hardware-dependent. I think it's not an easy task to modify it. To get an idea you may have a look at the Boot flow to find the right place for your insertion.


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I think if it was me, given the constraints, I'd define a new pixel-mangling encoder in vc4 drm that used the writeback engine ("txp") to capture HVS scenes to memory, and make sure that your console and X11 were displaying to that and not HDMI. Once each write back completes, I'd do whatever algorithm on the captured scene into a new buffer, and then emit ...


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You should start with the "Hello Triangle" sample code that comes with Raspbian and works on all models of Raspberry Pi to get started with OpenGL. Just get rid of the spinning and 5 of the 6 cube faces. To capture the linux framebuffer you can take fb2png apart. Just focus on the parts that acquire the framebuffer /dev/fb0 and convert it into a 32-bit ...


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It always depends on what you put in and expect to get out. So what is your video source? Assuming a USB-Webcam as your V4L2 suggests makes it very CPU intensive. Also doing the deformation on the CPU will limit you in the resolution you can use as the amount of work scales with the pixel count. The green field for something like that would be to stay on ...


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You will not be able to run Tizen on raspberry. It's a propritary OS. You can create a linux image for Raspberry with something like Buildroot. It's a tool which create image with a linux kernel and an initramfs. But its not easy to create/personalise and you will need some good known about programming.


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As already mentioned, the problem is that the export happens in parallel and the files might even be created with the correct permission but they may not respond even to successful file operations. Add to this that you can't change pullups using gpio sysfs, why even bother using it? There's only one really good reason, if you want want input pin change ...


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To run a script when the WiFi is connected you can use wpa_cli. In man wpa_cli you find for option -a: -a file Run in daemon mode executing the action file based on events from wpa_supplicant. The specified file will be executed with the first argument set to interface name and second to "CONNECTED" or "DISCONNECTED" depending on the event. This can be ...


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You don't use a docker image. It's just a plain Raspbian image you use. There is one important step you have to execute when you copied the image on the SD card: Enable ssh access. See Enable SSH on a headless Raspberry Pi


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I had the same problem and I found that tlp service was the cause. I did a "apt purge tlp" and my disks stopped spinning down in seconds.


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To restore a Raspbian image use the dd command in reverse. Use a Linux machine and follow the instructions in the official documentation. The command you're looking for is sudo dd bs=4M if=backup.img of=/dev/sdb


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That's why I wrote a script to backup my Raspberries. Initially dd was used, then tar and finally rsync. The script is called raspiBackup and OpenSource. Just give it a try.


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The important messages seem to be: nl80211: Set mode ifindex 3 iftype 3 (AP) nl80211: Failed to set interface 3 to mode 3: -95 (Operation not supported) nl80211: Interface mode change to 3 from 0 failed nl80211: Could not configure driver mode For my interpretation hostapd tries to set the interface to mode 3 (AP) that is an access point (line 1). But the ...


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Raspbian has a number of backup utilities - I have used backintime-gnome to back up to a HDD, and I am sure this would work to a server. rsync can be used to backup files, but to fully restore requires a formatted/partitioned SD Card and does not manage partitioning. Both of the above perform incremental backups. There are numerous backup utilities in ...


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rsync is always a good candidate for backups, especially if you want to automate them, because it can do incremental backups. Have a look at this answer Can a Raspberry Pi be used to create a backup of itself?. If you plan on keeping unarchived backups on another machine also check my answer on a related question Restore backup failed (using rsync)


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The fans are designed to be on when the Pis are on. If you want to switch them on and off under software control you will need to write the software, add additional hardware, and change the fan power wiring (e.g a transistor per fan to switch the power on and off).


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