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24

Loading modules at boot is a little different to running startup commands. In Debian: Add the module name as a new line in /etc/modules In Arch Linux: Add the module name to the module array in /etc/rc.conf, the line should look like this: modules=(snd_bcm2835) Or for the new systemd configuration: echo "snd_bcm2835" | sudo tee -a /etc/modules-load.d/...


23

First of all, make sure you use the proper kernel headers. I assume that your kernel headers and source code are more updated than the kernel you're running. Try to do an apt-get update && apt-get upgrade then reinstall the module. If the problem persists, triple check that your kernel headers match your current kernel, recompile again then try to ...


14

Modprobe on Boot - Debian To answer the specific question about sudo modprobe snd_bcm2835, add the module to /etc/modules and reboot. (You will need to be root to do this.) Starting services - Debian Debian using initscripts to initialise the system, and you can use them to run arbitrary commands. You need to install a script similar to the following in /...


12

Assuming the module loads using sudo modprobe i2c-dev, you should add i2c-dev to /etc/modules.


10

pigpio provides the C and Python hooks needed by a programmer to use arbitrary gpios as serial links. The incoming C hooks are somewhat simpler than the outgoing C hooks. For the Python hooks see http://abyz.me.uk/rpi/pigpio/python.html


8

The Broadcom BCM2835 does not have on-board ethernet so just like the standard raspberry pi you will need to add ethernet via USB. On the B/B+ the ethernet was provided via the LAN9512 USB hub/ethernet chip. So for the compute module development board you can just get a compatible USB ethernet adapter. For a device built around the compute module you might ...


8

Please follow the steps and see if it works. $ sudo apt-get update $ sudo apt-get install python-pip #if you don't have pip installed already $ sudo pip install pyusb


8

No there's not - a fact that a quick look on the rather short list of models of the Raspberry Pi would reveal. I'd also assume that the intended audience of the Pi and the targeted cost structure of the board are prohibitive to this approach. Interchangeable however are all the "non-essential" peripherals given the variety of modules provided by the RPi ...


7

They are blacklisted in /etc/modprobe.d/raspi-blacklist.conf # blacklist spi and i2c by default (many users don't need them) blacklist spi-bcm2708 blacklist i2c-bcm2708 so comment these lines.


7

pyusb library comes in two versions: stable (0.4.x) under development (1.0.x) Debian distribution only contains stable version and this is the one that you have installed using apt-get command. Now pyrow is trying to import usb.core which only exist in 1.0.x version of the library. And indeed, pyrow's website states that it need's 1.0 version of pyusb. ...


7

You can also use the ENC28J60 Module, which is only a few dollars from the usual places - ebay, aliexpress etc, and won't consume your USB port. To do this, wire things up: Pi ENC28J60 ---------------------- +3V3 VCC GND GND GPIO8 CS GPIO9/MISO SO GPIO10/MOSI SI GPIO11/SCLK SCK GPIO25 NT Now, with your ...


6

What is the difference between kernel "3.18.11" and "3.18.11-v7+"? The -v7+ is tacked on to indicate this isn't from a vanilla source tree, and that it was compiled specifically for the Pi 2. I'm planning to get this kernel source: wget https://github.com/raspberrypi/linux/archive/rpi-3.18.y.tar.gz Is this the correct source for my kernel? No. If you ...


5

There is no reason you couldn't design a custom PCB and stick a bunch of compute modules on them if you desired. There are a few "gotchas" though. This wouldn't be particularly powerful. The chips used in the Raspberry Pi are old. Relatively ancient in the way high performance computers work. Sure you can have a dozen of the RPi's SOC chips, but is that ...


5

This is a multi step proces: Step 1: Get the git_hash from the firmware First you need the commit id of the firmware (firmware-commit-id) from the raspberrypi-bootloader package: zgrep '* firmware as of' /usr/share/doc/raspberrypi-bootloader/changelog.Debian.gz | head -1 With the firmware-commit-id in mind, you go to https://github.com/raspberrypi/...


5

There is a much simpler version here, tested on jessie and stretch. sudo apt-get install raspberrypi-kernel-headers and then when your files are in place : make -C /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/build M=$(pwd) modules Example Create the hello directory, go inside and create the following files : hello.c and Makefile. I recommend working as your normal user,...


4

I found that you could load the sound drivers and stuff on Raspbian with: sudo modprobe snd_bcm2835 && sudo amixer cset numid=3 1 The first command loads the sound driver module, the second I think sets the sound output to the 3.5mm socket. You can then use alsamixer to adjust the volume, and speaker-test -c2 -t sine to test the speakers You can ...


4

I was able to get the desired results using a program called softbeep. http://0pointer.de/lennart/projects/softbeep/softbeep-0.3.tar.gz I needed to obtain the libncurses5 and libX11 development packages to compile it. sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libncurses5-dev libX11-dev After compiling (make), I needed to edit the sb-beep file to (1) ...


4

Looking at the header it appears gpio_set_debounce isnt actually implemented which would explain why your code changes didnt make a difference static inline int gpio_set_debounce(unsigned gpio, unsigned debounce) { return -ENOSYS; } Try checking/printing the return value of your call to verify it is indeed so. (I wasnt able to find the headers for the ...


4

I was able to make this unit work with my Raspberry Pi 3 using volumio and osmc without the need of any software tweaking. I must say that it sounds very good on both distributions. While using both the distributions, I selected the HifiBerry DAC profile from system settings. Note that my unit came with the jumpers for the extended headers already shorted....


3

You probably want a seventh, central Pi controlling 6 other Pis, all connected to the same network. The master Pi will send a command to the 6 other Pis to take the photograph. The 6 other 'slave' Pis will each have a camera module. Remember you can't have more than one camera module per Pi. Take a look at this - might give you some ideas http://makezine....


3

Here are the steps required to build a kernel module on Raspbian. Perform an sudo rpi-update See https://github.com/Hexxeh/rpi-update for details on rpi-update. You have to be on the latest firmware and associated kernel to be able to perform the next step. Install and run rpi-source to install the source code that built the latest kernel that you are ...


3

There are loads of ways of running a command at start-up in Linux but my favoured approach is to create an initialisation script in /etc/init.d and register it using update-rc.d. This way the application is started and stopped automatically when the system boots / shutdowns. See this post for a set of instructions on how to create one on the Raspberry Pi.


3

The kernel does not create device files. The kernel creates and destroys the actual device, but something in userspace - typically either udev or you the sysadmin - must create/remove the device files. Device files are ultimately just a handle for major/minor number pairs - you can give them any name you like. It's entirely possible to have a device file ...


3

I was able to build (make) the module on my Raspberry Pi itself instead of cross compiling it on another machine. However, I needed to perform the steps listed at the end to avoid the following error: raspberrypi ~/dht11km $ make make -C /lib/modules/3.10.25+/build M=/home/johnma/dht11km modules make: *** /lib/modules/3.10.25+/build: No such file or ...


3

While not doing this with compute modules, I have 6 PI3's running together to test HA setups (database cluster sometimes, load balanced nginx servers other times). It's way cheaper to buy 6 pi's (and the various and sundry parts to get them running) than it is to lease 6 virtual machines or buy even a modest computer capable of hosting 6 VM's simultaneously....


3

modprobe is not in a standard user's path as it is not runnable as a standard user. It requires superuser privileges to run. If you use the command sudo modprobe the command will be found. sudo which modprobe will show its location, normally /sbin/modprobe. Try launching the script using sudo, i.e. precede the command you use to launch the script with ...


3

I started with Raspian 3.18.5 (Wheezy?) and did an apt-get update and ended up with 4.1.10 (Jessie?). I don't think you can end up going from wheezy to jessie just with apt-get update. They will both be on 4.1.x kernels by now. Check w/ cat /etc/issue. If it says Raspbian 7 you are still using wheezy. You probably should do the upgrade at some point; ...


3

See answer here https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=91&t=154749 You can try sudo apt-get install raspberrypi-kernel-headers if you're running raspbian.


3

Yes, This should work with a few caveats (see below). To connect the USB to TTL you would connect a USB cable to the board and then the pins would connect to your GPS module. This will not provide access to the PPS signal from the GPS module (this may not be an issue depending on your project and its requirements. You can work around this by connecting a ...


3

The short answer is no, a magnet will not interfere with your GPS module. The reason is that the electric field strength of the GPS signal will not be altered in any significant way by the relatively modest magnetic field of your magnet. Also, if the intent of the magnet is to temporarily affix the module the metal of your vehicle, most of the magnetic ...


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