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It is dhcpcd now by default; check with systemdctl status dhcpcd, so you could experiment with how using the widget (I never have) affects dhcpcd.conf, and the stuff in /etc/networking and possibly the hooks (active ones are in /etc/dhcpcd and /lib/dhcpcd). I would guess it is the widget misbehaving as the people responsible for that != the people ...


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Very confusing. You named the device "pibridge" but use routing. Is there also a bridge? You use NetworkManager which isn't supported by Raspbian Stretch and does not conform with dhcpcd but you try to set a static ip address with dhcpcd to eth0. As you show that doesn't work because eth0 does not get an ip address. Then it is unclear for me what you mean ...


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First of all, you should add an IP address to eth0 that is in the same range with dnsmasq configuration. ifconfig eth0 192.168.8.254 netmask 255.255.255.0 up Be sure that 127.0.0.1 is one of your host nameserver or add it to /etc/resolv.conf. echo "nameserver 127.0.0.1" > /etc/resolv.conf Finally, reboot your host or restart dnsmasq and networking ...


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Change your dnsmasq.conf to interface=eth0 dhcp-range=192.168.8.8,192.168.8.250,255.255.255.0,12h


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As a side note, seeing WiFi networks but being unable to connect is one of the symptoms I've got after switching from Rapsbian Buster repo to regular Debian Buster repo and upgrading. That's obviously not the OP's case, but other people finding this question might find it useful. Note that there's no easy way to undo an arbitrary upgrade involving many ...


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Please do not touch /etc/network/interfaces if you do not know what you are doing. Please be aware the line in it: # Please note that this file is written to be used with dhcpcd To setup WiFi just create a file wpa_supplicant.conf in /boot, something like this, but with your settings: rpi ~$ cat /boot/wpa_supplicant.conf ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/...


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If you ask to configure DHCP in systemd I assume you mean to use systemd-networkd. Then with "automatically" enabled DHCP server you must have a DHCPServer=yes line in the [Network] section of your *.network file. You can add a section [DHCPServer] with additional options. Here is an example: rpi ~# cat /etc/systemd/network/12-ap0.network [Match] Name=ap0 [...


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This is not really a complete answer but you asked to look at the log. Due to formating issues it can only be done in an answer. But it may help you anyway. Sep 6 17:42:07 raspberrypi dnsmasq-dhcp[656]: DHCPDISCOVER(eth1) 5c:cf:7f:65:e5:94 Sep 6 17:42:07 raspberrypi dnsmasq-dhcp[656]: DHCPOFFER(eth1) 192.168.42.93 5c:cf:7f:65:e5:94 Sep 6 17:42:07 ...


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It should not be a problem to just install and configure dnsmasq on the Raspberry Pi in addition to the access point. Then you have to give its ip address to the devices that are connected to the access point. In the example of the setup you have used the Raspberry Pi (with the access point and the dnsmasq you have installed) has the static ip address 192....


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This is likely due to a cable which is only really good for 100Mbps connecting two 1Gbps ports: the devices are able to negotiate a 1Gbps connection, but it works poorly. Your best option is to get a better Ethernet cable. Another option is to install ethtool and limit the data rate to 100Mbps with ethtool -s eth0 speed 100 duplex full autoneg off


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Just now I used PC Win 10 cmd command ping to ping my Rpi4B raspbian 10 buster (2019jul10) with the following results: Ethernet (WiFi Disabled) = Zero loss, average < 1ms. Wifi (Ethernet cable disconnected) = Zero loss, average 1 mS (max 5mS) I used $ hostanme -I to find Ethernet IP as 42.3.130.83. Wifi 192.168.1.2/3 I am using Ethernet ftp ...


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As far as I understand you unplugged the wired ethernet cable from the RasPi for some hours. When plugged in again the network connection isn't reestablished. I don't know how exactly your setup looks so I can only guess a possible reason. It may be that the DHCP client on the RasPi does not recognize that the connection is broken but the Fritz!BOX do. So ...


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Use "pi-ap"- a Github repo which automates the configuration of a Pi 3 (or Pi 4) into a WiFi AP. Really, REALLY simple to use. Just edit variables.sh and change some default values, and then sudo ./install.sh will get you a working Pi Access Point in about 3.5 minutes while you drink your tea. Only need a Pi 3B+ or a Pi 4, an Ethernet cable and a router ...


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@ingo was exactly right, and what he recommended worked perfectly. All other problems I has were caused by thrashing prior to asking the question here. Things I did wrong: Enabled predictable network interface names using raspi-config; "normal" is disabled, and enabling changes "eth0" into something presumably "random" and henceforth reliable. Didn't ...


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For the information you have given I can't see why to install a dhcp server. It's also a bit dangerous if you don't know what you are doing because on a subnet (exactly on a broadcast domain) there must be only one dhcp server. That may conflict with an already running dhcp server on your internet router. The simplest solution is to give interface eth0 a ...


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Try "pi-ap": It automates configuration of a Pi 3B+ or Pi 4 running either Stretch or Buster into a WiFi Access Point. The following link provides an overview of the solution, benefits and a download link to the Github repo: Automate Configuration of Pi Access Point You only need to edit a few default values in a centralized variables file and execute ...


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As far as I understand you want to handle an error condition in a python script that is started by a service. If a wifi connection fails you want to reconnect it. You try to manage it with service management but manage services within a service is not a good idea because dependencies and other conditions are handled by different services at the same time and ...


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You write you are using a Raspberry Pi version 3B. Network booting is only supported by a Raspberry Pi version 3B+. Note the plus sign. The plus version is mainly released because it has improved boot options like stable USB boot and additional network boot. You have to use a RPi 3B+ for network booting.


-1

The problem is that when the services terminate, it terminates the child process also. This is the reason why the wifi again goes back to the disconnected state. When we use wpa_supplicant, there will be a background process running to load the configuration file and it is /sbin/wpa_supplicant -s -B -P /run/wpa_supplicant.wlan0.pid -i wlan0 -D nl80211,wext -...


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You are asking how to bridge eth0 with the uplink connection wlan1. This is not an easy task because bridging a client connection can only be done with WDS mode and must be supported by the hardware. The built-in device of the Raspberry Pi does not support it. For further information about this issue you can look at Raspberry Pi WiFi to Ethernet Bridge for ...


-1

Modified the .service file as follows [Unit] Description=captive portal automation [Service] Type=simple KillMode=process ExecStart=/home/pi/.caportal/do.sh That's it! Thanks for the comments


0

I think the issue was solved by configuring routing in 2 tables like this: From script when tun0 connects: #!/bin/sh VPN_IP=$(ip addr show tun0 | grep "inet\b" | awk '{print $2}' | cut -d/ -f1) echo ${VPN_IP} > /home/pi/tun0_ip /sbin/ip route add default via `echo ${VPN_IP}` dev tun0 From script when tun1 connects: #!/bin/sh VPN_IP=$(ip addr show tun1 ...


1

There is not very much information you have given about error- and debug-messages. Look at the journal if you can find some messages belonging to mounting network shares: rpi ~$ journalctl --boot --pager-end What message do you get with rpi ~$ sudo mount 10.0.1.6:/c/media /mnt/nfs Try with verbose output rpi ~$ sudo mount --verbose 10.0.1.6:/c/media /...


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# fallback to static profile on eth0 interface eth0 fallback static_eth0 Will tell dhcpcd to use DHCP and only assign the fallback if this fails You have duplicated interface entries and it is always difficult to guess what programs will actually do when getting conflicting data. See Fallback profile in How to set up networking/WiFi for more detail


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This problem can be reduced to make the RasPi a router with an WiFi uplink to the local hotspot/router and connect to a local wired network. It is no problem to use the wired and wireless connection at the same time because you asked it. If you mean to have all devices on the same subnet 192.168.1.0/24 then it isn't possible. For this you have to use a ...


1

I haven't found any important differences between the wifi devices on RPi 3B, RPi 3B+ (yes, that supports 5 GHz) and RPi 4B. All my wifi setups where upstream compatible. You are using Debian ifupdown. It may be possible that this old style networking get more and more out of the focus from the developers with newer versions of the operating system. In ...


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I have little experience of Ad hoc networking, and am unsure if the on-board hardware supports it. The settings you have tried should work if you disable dhcpcd sudo disable dhcpcd Then reboot.


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To do what you want is simple with systemd-networkd because it has everything built-in and you don't need additional helpers. So I will use it for my suggestion, tested with Raspbian Buster Lite 2019-07-10 updated on 2019-08-22. Updates done with sudo apt update && sudo apt full-upgrade && sudo reboot. First switch over to systemd-networkd. ...


0

You could use my project I once wrote. It isn't perfect and I don't have the time making it better. I'm using dnsmasq and dnsmasq can communicate with eth and wifi due to the Layer-3 protocol. My tool is tested on the Pi2 running Arch Linux. The project


4

Most popular distribution have changed its init system from old SysV to systemd including Debian and its flavor Raspbian. Scripts in /etc/init.d/ are leftover from SysV and they are all emulated by systemd. I think they are only available for backward compatibility of old scripts, or the maintainer of the programs still doesn't have realized that "init world"...


2

If @goldilocks' solution does not work, which it did not for me, you can always do a DNS lookup on the failing hostnames and use your /etc/hosts file to map the IP addresses to the hostnames. I had to go back and forth from pinging the failed mirror host names on another machine to test and get the IP addresses, mapping them on my arch server's hosts file, ...


1

You are mixing up different networking systems. As far as I can see it is old style Debian ifupdown managed in /etc/network/interfaces and Raspbian default networking dhcpcd. From the log I see a DHCPREQUEST from dhclient so I assume that you also use isc-dhcp-client in addition to dhcpcd. If so you have two dhcp clients running on your RasPi. This cannot ...


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