3

The Python spidev module has been broken (I think) since Linux kernel 3.15.x. Its maintenance has recently been augmented with more support so I expect a new version shortly. See Read this if you use Python Spidev.


3

Looks like the device interaction needs root access. I got help from the github community, from the authors. I have to use sudo ./gettingstarted


3

I have exactly the same problem. Two different NRF24L01 modules. Raspbian stretch worked in the beginning, since the last update no more. I use https://github.com/Gadgetoid//py-spidev/archive/master.zip together with https://github.com/BLavery/lib_nrf24 This seems to be on the SPI level. This thread: https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=...


3

Use readymade remote-controlled sockets. They should be tested AND work already. The hard part is replacing the supplied remote with a cheap 433 Mhz transciever , which might need reverse-engineering , see here : http://www.instructables.com/id/Mercury-RF-Remote-Socket-Control-From-Raspberry-Pi/?ALLSTEPS


2

The "4 Channel Wireless Remote Control Switch Relay" uses the 433Mhz RF frequency (basically the frequency used by garage door openers). The nRF24L01 uses the 2.4Ghz WiFi range. These two products don't work together as is. To make them work, you basically have 2 options: You do not use the nRF24L01 transceiver but instead buy a 433Mhz transmitter, such as ...


2

http://thedigitalryan.com/index.php/2015/05/24/raspberry-pi-2-and-arduino-with-nrf24l01-radios/ This one helped me. I had same problem, too.


2

You could use WebIOPi and send HTTP or CoAP to send control signals to your relay switches through WIFI or Ethernet If your relays are connected to GPIO you could access the Raspberry Pi's Webpage provided on the WebIOPi to control or trigger things. I use is for my work. If you are using the WebIOPI with Raspberry Pi 2 Model B use this patch to make the ...


2

There is also an article about doing what flakeshake suggests in the February 2016 edition of the MagPi. Alternatively (depending on where you live) you could buy the Energenie sockets and Pi controller board. These are for UK sockets but they also do a European socket version.


2

I just ran into the same issue, and discovered that it will segfault if you do not run the program as root (sudo). It would be great if it could be more helpful, but alas. Try putting sudo in front of the ./test Determined the problem by finding this comment in the source code: If the library runs with any other effective UID (ie not root), then ...


1

It sounds like you have destroyed the Pi and will need to buy a new one. The most likely explanation is you connected 5V to the Pi's 3V3 pin through the NRF24L01.


1

For whatever it's worth, I've determined that it must be a power-supply issue. I bought a new power-supply out of desperation and the problem went away. I guess my old power-supply was on it's last-leg and just couldn't keep up with the requirements of powering additional components. It seems it could barely even keep up with the Pi itself since the Pi was ...


1

Added a delay (>20ms) before radio.write() (arduino side) solved the issue. radio.startListening() seems to be very slow in python and as a result, the pi miss the reply (most of the time).


1

Try to correct your PA Power levels, on both sites must be the same. Try to correct your CRC Length, on both sites must be the same. Check if addreses are correctly set: on RPI TX addr must be same as Arduino RX addr and Arduino TX Addr must be the same as RPI addr. First rule: setup must be same on both sides of transmission, and addresses must be mirrored. ...


1

I wrote some code for my pigpio library. I posted the code as an answer to a similar question. It was tested between a PiB and Pi3B. It requires the pigpio library and the pigpio daemon to be running. Both are installed in recent Raspbian images.


1

First, I noticed that building the library as told on the documentation with: sudo make install -B Run inside another configure, which deletes yours. That said, what I did was, from my $~ directory: cd ./RF24/ sudo ./configure --driver=SPIDEV Went to the file Makefile.inc and replace (as told by Joan in a comment): CC=...-gcc --> CC=gcc CXX=...-g++ --...


1

This answer fixed my issues In lib_nrf24.py in function: def begin(self, csn_pin ... after self.spidev.open add: self.spidev.max_speed_hz = 4000000


1

Apparently the CE pins of the SPI are not supposed to be on at the same time. So what I tried to do is to merge the two programs into one. This unified program has some basic configuration in the beginning for both the RF modules, and a loop that checks if there is new packet at either modules, one loop checks the rf24, next loop the rfm69 etc... Although it ...


1

Use different variable for checking pipe number: Test whether there are bytes available to be read in the FIFO buffers. Parameters [out] pipe_num Which pipe has the payload available uint8_t pipeNum; if(radio.available(&pipeNum)){ radio.read(&data,sizeof(data)); Serial.print("Got data on pipe"); Serial.println(pipeNum); } Returns True ...


1

I am using the same wireless remote control switch and have built a program, that sends control signals from a PC. To use it as-is, you would need an 433MHz transmitter (see Phil's answer) and an ATMega8 controller with a USB plug hooked to it (I have repurposed an USBASP programmer so I don't have to solder anything). Install avr-gcc, build the firmware, ...


1

I had the same problem a few months ago and while I never found a reliable solution I can offer this workaround: get a Arduino Pro Mini 3.3V (the cheap ones start at EUR 2) program it to handle the communication and take I/O via the serial port (I got it to output JSON) because it's 3.3V you can connect it directly to the Raspberry serial port. If you want ...


1

I faced the same problem when I tried to send data from an Arduino to a Raspberry Pi 2. I used this library https://github.com/TMRh20/RF24 I submitted a question on github https://github.com/TMRh20/RF24/issues/114 but in the meantime I found a way to make it work. Basically what I did was to add these 2 lines before the while(1) loop radio.stopListening();...


1

I found a tutorial in youtube and now I can send and receive data between Arduino and the Pi. One of the things is not detailed in most tutorial is the importance of have the same radio pipe addresses in both device, it seems like obvius but when you don't now the library isn't obvius. so I changed the line: const uint64_t pipes[2] = { 0xF0F0F0F0E1LL, ...


1

You should be able to follow this: https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=99227


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