4

"Do I still need rpi-update if I am using the latest version of Raspbian?" I don't know how often people need to be told, or why they ignore the warning if they do run it! "In normal circumstances there is NEVER a need to run rpi-update as it always gets you to the leading edge firmware and kernel and because that may be a testing version it could leave ...


3

There is a special issue with Raspberry Pis (except RPi 4B) because they boot from their GPU. On Debian wiki - RaspberryPi you will find: All Raspberry Pi models before the 4 (1A, 1B, 1A+, 1B+, Zero, Zero W, 2, 3) boot from their GPU (not from the CPU!), so they require a non-free binary blob to boot. So any arm64 OS that shall boot on your RPi 3B+ must at ...


2

The OS need configuring for each model of Pi which has significant internal differences from the last. This configuration isn't difficult (e.g. different peripheral base address, different number of processors) but it does require effort. Such things like editing the software, testing the software, documenting the software, releasing the software all take ...


2

Raspbian Lite boots to a command prompt with the option to force login or bypass if you want. You could actually install the full version of Raspbian and configure the system to boot into command line mode by default via the raspi-config utility. Then when you have a mouse and space handy you just start the GUI system up with the command startx So you ...


2

The rpi-update command updates the kernel. The SD card's boot partition holds the kernel. So if you re-flash your SD card, the kernel will be replaced. If you meant to say rpi-eeprom-update though, that is different. This command updates the RPi's internal EEPROM storage, and it will not be reset if you re-flash the SD card. BTW you should never have to ...


2

The Raspberry Pi Foundation now has their own image burning software called Raspberry Pi Imager. You can download it here: https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/


1

To expand on what Milliways has written. On a brand new RPi4B you should get a copy of plain Raspbian and boot that. As soon as it's booted run sudo apt update; sudo apt dist-upgrade -y; reboot as soon a it has rebooted run sudo rpi-eeprom-update to get the latest stable version of the bootcode. Don't install the beta version of the EEPROM update, it's ...


1

No, "flashing" an SD cards destroys all data including the "boot" partition, which in turn includes the firmware files. The firmware will be reset to the version which is included in the LibreELEC image.


1

I do not have a clear idea of what you are trying to do, so this is a generic answer. If this doesn't get you where you need to be, perhaps you can clarify your question. Anyway... It sounds like either fuser or lsof may do what you need. From your description, fuser may work, but "circumstances" could change that. In general fuser is perhaps more widely ...


1

You will need to build a rescue system on another SDCard. Boot that and mount the broken system in a USB reader. Then spend time checking and correcting the permissions of everything you think you've damaged. Easier may be to build a fresh Raspbian Buster system then move your stuff (programs & data you've created) from the original broken system, ...


1

According to Wikipedia The operating system is Orbis OS, based on FreeBSD 9. Operating systems generally need to include low-level hardware drivers for each different type of hardware they need to work on. This includes hardware such as specific USB-interface ICs, specific graphics accellerators as well as the exact CPU chips etc being used. A USB ...


1

The Raspberry Pi cannot run the PS4's operating system, because of architectural and hardware incompatibilities. The PS4's OS (while based on a freely available Linux distro) requires proprietary hardware and expects certain peripherals, moreover, I don't believe that even the new pi4 meets the system requirements.


1

Baking Pi tutorials are outdated if you want to play on Raspberry pi 4 but "it's a free course on building a very simple operating system for the Raspberry Pi in assembly language", the author Liz Upton said. However, the "jsandler18's tutorial" which hosted on github - Building an Operating System for the Raspberry Pi might be helpful. You are ...


1

I see mainly two possibilities for your needs. You can setup a debian repository. Then you only need an initial SD Card installation that can be updated with apt from your own repository. How to do it you may have a look at Debian Repository Setup. You can setup a net booting infrastructure. This is more flexible than an repository because you can load ...


1

There is a good whitepaper here which describes in detail the differences between Yocto and Debian(Raspbian is a flavor of Debian). From the whitepaper, the gist is: Debian is good for fast trials, proof of concept and desktop like environments on hardware already supported by Debian with large memories and limited requirements for maintenance, ...


1

No, this does not work. Bochs emulates IA-32 alias x86 architecture. It is NOT a hypervisor. Raspberry Pi is running on ARM Cortex A series (or ARM 11 in case of the original Pi and Pi Zero). You will need to find another way to get Tic-80 on your PSP. Either an emulator for ARM architecture or a direct port of Tic-80 to MIPS.


1

i know its a long long time ago you asked the question, but now i created a OPNsense Port for the RPI3, you can find it here: https://forum.opnsense.org/index.php?topic=14875.0


1

Several posters have mentioned the importance of keeping your Pi up-to-date, but most resources I've found simply suggest manually running apt-get from time-to-time, which seems like a poor approach. I'd much prefer to have security updates automatically installed. The Debian unattended-upgrades package is supposed to support this, but (on Raspbian?) it's a ...


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