30

Without overvoltage (i.e. at the default 1.2V), most Pis can run at up to 800MHz stably. With overvoltage, 1000MHz is common. WARNING: Setting any of the parameters which over volt your Raspberry Pi will set a permanent bit within the SOC and your warranty is void. So If you care about the warranty do not adjust voltage. References: http://www....


28

There was a change in the firmware/kernel recently, that enabled kernel CPU frequency scaling. Now, you don't set static CPU frequency in config.txt, you set maximum frequency. If your system is on load, it will change CPU frequency to higher value (it is called turbo mode, you can see the max setting in your log line) but if your system is idle, it will ...


14

Even with dynamic frequency set, the Raspberry Pi has a very high default frequency scaling threshold. To quote this blog post on overclocking the Pi: The ondemand governor used in the Raspberry Pi will increase the CPU speed to the maximum configured value whenever it finds it to be busy more than 95% of the time. That sounds fair enough for most cases, ...


13

The Raspberry Pi contains a /boot/config.txt. This file is read by the GPU before the ARM core is initialised. It can be used to set various system configuration parameters. Which can be used for overclocking. WARNING: Setting any of the following parameters which over volt your Raspberry Pi will set a permanent bit within the SOC and your warranty is ...


12

From http://www.raspberrypi-spy.co.uk/2012/06/overclocking-benchmarking-the-raspberry-pi/, I learned that the /boot directory actually resides in a specific partition that is readable directly from Windows (and probably many other OSes...). So I just have to insert the card in my laptop, edit the file, et voilĂ ...


10

Yes it would. https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/configuration/config-txt.md The various system configuration parameters, which would traditionally be edited and stored using a BIOS, are stored in an optional text file named config.txt. This is read by the GPU before the ARM CPU (and Linux) is initialised; therefore it must be located on the first ...


9

There are a list of confirmed clock speeds achieved which would save you some time: http://elinux.org/RPi_config.txt#Overclocking_options so someone has managed 1000MHz with some overvolting applied, of course this invalidates your warranty so maybe stock up on a few :)


8

Yes, it can be overclocked. Here are the details: The Pi bootloader still follows the overclocking parameters that's usually placed in the /boot/config.txt file despite raspi-config not having any overclocking settings for the Pi 3. raspi-config doesn't have any of the overclock good stuff since the Pi 3 doesn't officially support overclocking. Basically, ...


7

It seems to me that you updated from all firmware, which only supported static ARM frequency to newer one, which supports dynamic frequency change using cpufreq infrastructure. You can read about this change in my answer to the question Why won't my Raspberry Pi overclock? You can also quite easily check this, just type: cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/...


7

The raspi-config tool, at least in recent Raspbian releases (September 19th, 2012), allows you to hold the Shift key during boot to return to a non-overclocked state. This worked for me when my device didn't finish booting at 1000MHz. You can now choose from one of five overclock presets in raspi-config, the highest of which runs the ARM at 1GHz. The ...


6

As Qualcuno pointed out yesterday, the RPi (all models) does not have support for hardware acceleration of H.265 video sources. As such, the RPi just doesn't have the raw horsepower needed to decode higher resolution videos on the fly. Will an MPEG-2 License help? MPEG-2 is a totally different encoding type, so no it won't help your case. do I even ...


5

The cpu frequency is scaled on demand. You can set the threshold via the `up_threshold' sysctl variable. You can set it via: sudo sh -c "echo 20 > /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/ondemand/up_threshold" This will set the threshold to 20% CPU utilization. The scaling governor can be set to ondemand via: sudo sh -c "echo ondemand > /sys/devices/system/...


5

Like any other processor, the Raspberry Pi 3 will be overclockable. Searching for BCM2837 is unlikely to get you any useful results at this point. It's a custom SOC designed specifically for the RPi 3. Within the SOC is a Cortex-A53 CPU. Unfortunately, the ARM page doesn't go into much detail about fast you can (or should) clock it. That lack of knowledge ...


5

According to this article about the Pi 3, overclocking is not an option. Not yet at least. The Pi 3 is stuck at 1.2 Ghz for now, which should be plenty fast. EDIT: Using the Overclock setting in sudo raspi-config on a Pi 3 returns this message: This Raspberry Pi cannot be overclocked. I'm sure there is (or will be) a way to manually overclock it, but it ...


4

Add force_turbo=1 in your config.txt.


4

shutdown, halt and reboot should all safely close you system before turning it of (or rebooting). So it's definitely not the cause of your problem. So it's either because of overclocking or some other error you did when trying this. We can't check that since you already overwritten the card contents. Next time you have similar problem, you can first ...


4

These commands should do it. vcgencmd measure_clock arm vcgencmd measure_volts core If you like to monitor them in realtime, you can use watch: watch -n1 "vcgencmd measure_clock arm && vcgencmd measure_volts core or you can add a cronjob to write it inside file. Is that what you are looking for?


4

From this document (The Foundation doesn't handle warranty returns): Newark element14 has no obligation to repair, replace, or provide refunds in the following instances: If the alleged defect arises because Customer has altered or repaired the Raspberry pi without the prior written consent or authorization of Newark element14 If ...


4

The problem is a lack of understanding on your part. If overclocking works its is a bonus. There are no guarantees. It depends on the luck of the draw as to whether the silicon you actually have is good enough to overclock to any particular value.


4

The Pi Zero uses the same silicon as Pi 1, so they have the same top speed 1GHz. Pi 1 came with a more conservative clock speed but Pi Zero came already maxed out, so it makes no sense to overclock Pi Zero (but on the other way Pi 1 should be able to be cranked to Pi Zero levels.)


4

Overclock at your own risk: Overclocking is not exactly safe, but it can be done right and the Pi 3 will likely run without any problems if so. Not all Pi's are made equal so some people may be able to overclock their Pi to 1500 MHz will others may only be able to get 1300 MHz. It is a game of testing. I have my Pi 3 running perfectly fine at arm_freq=1350 ...


4

A RPI3 can decode 1080p HEVC quite well. There have been NEON optimizations to HW-accelerate HEVC decoding. Best played with KODI. The problem is a RPI3 is running hot, so it starts throttling, an RPI3+ has much less thermal issues. Nowadays a RPI3+ can even decode 10bit 1080p HEVC pretty well. Use the latest KODI/LibreElec builds for the best performance.


4

This is useless as you don't seem to run GPU RAM heavy OpenGL applications. You don't need more than 128MB GPU RAM to run videos smoothly as the hardware decoder will use only a fixed amount. So increasing it will not fix your issue. On the other hand you are reducing the RAM for the ARM CPU and therefore forcing it to use the Swapfile. This dramatically ...


3

That has changed. There's a certain set of requirements before the warranty bit is set. In short, its - if any of these parameters are set force_turbo current_limit_override temp_limit AND this parameter is set over_voltage>0 That's when the warranty is voided. Otherwise as long as you don't set any of the first three parameters, you should be fine ...


3

While you may not be able to install raspi-config, you should still be able to create the file /boot/config.txt. Once config.txt is in /boot/, add any required parameters. In your case, check out some of the overclocking options in the eLinux wiki. As always is the case with overclocking, be careful!


3

To get the memory usage, try the following command, this will give you usage in MB. free -m Are you referring to the SOC frequency? It currently cannot be set dynamically (while the RPi is on). But there should be a firmware update sometime soon, that enables this. Keep an eye out for it. If your speaking not dynamically, then the overclock values can be ...


3

Setting the governor to "performance" should mean the processor runs at the maximum frequency set in config.txt, or the default if there isn't one. Note that this is generally pointless except in unusual contexts, since when required gearing up to a higher frequency happens much faster than is humanly perceivable. I have read that using a raspberry pi B+ ...


3

There are two easy solutions: A fan powered by the GPIOs. Just take an old computer fan running at 12 Volts and plug it on the GND and 5V output of the pi. It will run slower than on 12 Volts of course, but fast enough to cool. You can also buy cooling rips. You can get them specifically made for the pi or you can also use transistor cooling rips. You can ...


3

Your question should be "Which material has a lower thermal resistance: thermal paste, or thermal pads"? The material with the lower thermal resistance will keep the temperature of your components coolest for any given heat sink. To find the answer to your question, we should do an Internet search. This search yields a link that contains the answer to your ...


2

If you are using a raspbian based distribution you can use "raspi-config" to change the memory-split, overclock your raspi and many more.


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