35

I finally found a resource that is explaining my question. http://softwarebakery.com/shrinking-images-on-linux Short: Yes, truncating is possible! Summary of the process: Extracting the partition information from the image using fdisk: $ fdisk -lu image.img Disk image.img: 4096 MB, 4096000000 bytes, 8000000 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 ...


33

The image creates 2 disk partitions SDB1 and SDB2 in the image above. SDB1 is formatted as a fat16 filesystem, this partition is the only one seen by Windows and hence the small amount of free space it reports. Gparted sees both the fat formatted partition and the ext4 formatted partition. By default the image does not use all of the space available on ...


18

Found this article -> Mount a Raspberry Pi SD card on a Mac (read-only) with osxfuse and ext4fuse, It worked like a charm. Here is the commands I ran om my mac: brew cask install osxfuse brew install ext4fuse sudo mkdir /Volumes/rpi sudo ext4fuse /dev/disk2s2 /Volumes/rpi -o allow_other sudo cp /Volumes/rpi/home/pi/Pictures/* /Users/me/work/raspi/Pix/ I ...


16

On Difference between UUID and PARTUUID You can get a few hints about the difference between UUID and PARTUUID by specifying the -p option. blkid -p /dev/sda1 or whatever device/partition you are looking at. You may have noticed that if there are multiple partitions on the same UUID device, the PARTUUID is mostly the same with the partition number appended....


9

There are a few things that you need to do to get this to work. First, after physically connecting the drive, run dmesg to see the name of the node in /dev. You should find something like this: [ 5155.744879] usb-storage 1-1.4.3:1.0: USB Mass Storage device detected [ 5155.753654] scsi host1: usb-storage 1-1.4.3:1.0 [ 5157.013418] scsi 1:0:0:0: Direct-...


9

Here is a solution with netbooting using sytemd-networkd. Network booting works only for the wired adapter. Booting over wireless LAN is not supported 1. It is also important that there is already a working DHCP server on the local network. We use RPi 3B+. It comes with "Improved PXE network and USB mass-storage booting" 2. So PXE booting will work out ...


8

If btrfs is compiled as a kernel module, then you need to create an initramfs to load the module at boot. On Raspian (and other debian derivatives), update-initramfs is the easiest method to do this. If initramfs-tools is installed, then any time apt-get installs a new kernel, it should trigger update-initramfs automatically. sudo apt-get update sudo apt-...


8

You can do it all on the Pi if you have SSH or terminal access, below are some notes I made when I first did it, you shouldn't lose any data if you do it correctly but as always it pays to have a backup just in case : At a terminal prompt (you may need to amend the partition names depending on your layout/requirements) N.B. the results in this example were ...


6

Make sure you have ForwardX11 yes in your local /etc/ssh/ssh_config Now the problem is that when you sudo, you don't have the right credentials in .Xauthority. The -E option preserves your environment so $ sudo -E gparted


6

This answer is not specific to the raspberry pi, but is general advice for remote administered servers. ssh. Using secure shell is almost as good as being there. serial console and out of band administration: if you screw up your network interface having a second way to login is a lifesaver. a simple way would be to have a Identical backup machine running ...


6

You can pipe dd backups into gzip, as the blocks are 0 when unused they are highly compressible. ssh pi@192.168.1.38 sudo dd bs=4M if=/dev/mmcblk0 | gzip -c > raspberry_dd_4M.img.gz or from a linux card reader dd if=/dev/sdc bs=4M | gzip > rasppi_4M.img.gz and the obligatory recovery command gunzip -dc /home/user/raspberry_dd_4M.img.gz | dd bs=4M ...


6

As explained here, the "Data Partition" option creates a buffer that is untouched when the OS is installed. Like any partition, it segregates memory so that if a OS is reinstalled to the SD card, it doesn't wipe out all the preexisting memory. Data Partition - Add a 512mb data partition for data that will be kept safe during a re-instalation of an ...


6

It is possible to create an empty image for a Raspberry Pi. Then you can copy an operating system with a boot and root partition to it and boot. To fill the empty image you can use any usable file copy method, e.g. from a tar archive, or rsync, or just cp. This way you are completely free to shrink or expand storage, or use other partition sizes than given ...


5

If the error can happen any time after the system started, you can use a watchdog timer and some boot script. The principle of this method is that whenever the system reboots without properly shut down, it goes to the recovery partition. You need to write a script that runs every time the system starts and properly shuts down. Change /boot/cmdline.txt to ...


5

I know this is an old question, but I would like to show how to do this process on Mac, because it is not as easy: fdisk doesn't have the -l option, and truncate is not installed by default: 1. Step 1: Install truncate on Mac OS X: You need MacPorts or Homebrew for this. I use MacPorts. If you don't have one of these, go ahead and install them first. Link ...


4

It is not possible, Unix like system relies on standards that are not implemented in FAT or NTFS. Your system need permissions, groups, symbolic links to work properly. Neither FAT nor NTFS can provide it.


4

Once an SD card starts producing errors I believe it is defunct. They generally use a methodology called wear levelling (apparently often via a 32-bit ARM microcontroller) to maximize their lifespan.1 This means the addresses the card exposes are virtual, they do not literally correspond to specific physical blocks; a consequence of wear levelling is that ...


4

After digging around some more.. I looked at the init_resize script and noticed that the disk id was being replaced in /etc/fstab. Apparently, when a new partition is created, the disk id is changed, so creating a new image, creating the new partition, then: fdisk -l /dev/sdd Disk /dev/sdd: 62.9 GB, 62881005568 bytes 64 heads, 32 sectors/track, ...


4

You can put your filesystem on an external drive, there are instructions to use an external drive to boot your Pi. See https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/raspberrypi/bootmodes/msd.md Alternatively you can continue to boot from SD Card, and use external mounted storage. See https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/configuration/external-...


4

Question: I have a 32Gb SD card and I want to make a light copy of my os to make it work on a 16Gb SDcard. Answer - use image-backup Perhaps the easiest way to do this is with the image-backup utility - part of image-utils. If you are running RPi OS, image-backup has these advantages: image-backup may be done on a "live" system: no need to shut ...


3

of should be /dev/sdb You write the image to the card, not to a specific partition of the card. The image in itself contains partitions - that is why it shows up as corrupt in gparted.


3

First try to raw-copy the entirety of data on the card, byte by byte. You may even want to set the little lever on the card to read-only or lock or whatever it says dd if=/dev/sdX of=~/backup.img Where sdX is your card. It may also be sth. like mmblc or so. Do NOT add a number behind X, so that (if any are still detected) all partitions are copied. Now ...


3

Boot your pi and enter a shell. Then enter sudo raspi-config There should be an option to expand the file system. See for example: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-use-raspiconfig-to-set-up-your-raspberry-pi.html


3

Raspbian kernel doesn't include support btrfs by default; the initial boot stages run normally, but when the kernel loads, it won't see any filesystem which it could mount - and panics. A solution exists: add btrfs as a kernel module, in initramfs. Largely thanks to three different articles, I have set it up thus: Install the required packages - the kernel ...


3

AFAIK there's only one way to mount Extfs on a Mac and that's via Paragon Extfs for Mac It's commercial software but they do have a 30-day trial. Works great for me.


3

Download the "Apple Pi Baker App" and use this software to transfer an image to your SD card or backup an image to an image:


3

You also can use tar to backup your root and boot partition. tar will backup only used space. To backup the root partition you can use following command: tar -cvpzf /root.tar.gz --exclude=/root.tar.gz --one-file-system / To backup the boot partition you can use following command: tar -cvpzf /boot.tar.gz --exclude=/boot.tar.gz --one-file-system /boot


3

Partitioning the flash drive is a decent solution and one I use in my own setup. The downside to this method is that the drive will no longer work on a Windows environment, since Windows will only recognize the first partition on removable media. Alternatively, you can mount the drive under /mnt/usb, and then create two folders: /mnt/usb/database, and /mnt/...


3

a simple way is to use Grub for ARM. UPDATE: It works with a help of U-boot, so the uBoot actually boots up a Grub kernel, take a look here - it's a full step-by-step guide I used when I was working with G4A+uBoot, it is not so hard to compile. To achieve the exact task you want you use fdisk to make 2 boot partitions and the rest is for your main system. ...


3

Thanks to Richard for giving this to the community. I stumbled also over this problem and was looking for a solution for hours. For those who are not so familiar here a step by step description to workaround this bug. First workaround I prefer: 1. dd your image to the sd card as usual (shown in question) 2. add new partition to the sd card (shown in ...


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