24

The password isn't actually stored anywhere on the system, a one way hash of it is. This means even if you have the hash, you won't be able to deduce the password. The hash itself is stored in /etc/shadow. Take the SD card out and stick it in another linux system; any common distro (ubuntu, fedora, arch, etc.) should do. On that system, create a new ...


21

Mount the SD card, go into the file system, and edit /etc/passwd. Find the line starting with "pi" that begins like this: pi:x:1000:1000... Get rid of the x; leave the colons on either side. This will eliminate the need for a password. You probably then want to create a new password by using the passwd command after you log in.


19

Raspbian by default is configured so that the root account can't be logged into using a password. This is done by starting with an entry in /etc/password which begins: root:x:0:0: The fields are separated by colons and explained in man 5 passwd (note the 5, since man passwd will give you the man page for the command passwd; section 5 is for configuration ...


19

The username is "pi" and the password is "raspberry", you have misspelled the word "raspberry" by missing the p. If you still have issues, I would try re-downloading, re-formatting, and doing it once more. I think you'll be fine after correcting the password entry. It's good practice after logging in to change the password of the user from the default. ...


14

Defaults are Username: root Password: centos


12

Distribution | Username | Password ---------------|------------|------------- Debian Squeeze | pi | raspberry Arch | root | root QtonPi | root | rootme Raspbian | pi | raspberry OpenElec | root | openelec Pidora | root | raspberrypi RISC OS | n/a | n/a raspbmc ...


12

According to https://github.com/raspberrypi/noobs/blob/9127ef2ce9301c3c8bf91b5c2ef09af90bf00216/buildroot/.config User:pass = root:raspberry


12

If you have physical access to the pi, look at these instructions. Essentially, mount the SD card using a different machine and edit cmdline.txt to include (at the end) init=/bin/sh. Then, run the following commands: mount -o remount,rw / passwd pi (enter a new password) sync exec /sbin/init


11

Linux doesn't display anything when you type your password. no asterisks, no dots, no nothing. After entering passwd on the command line and pressing enter type your password at the command prompt, nothing will display but that's ok. Raspberry pi document say: Enter passwd on the command line and press Enter. You'll be prompted to enter your current ...


9

As Jamie Cox commented in one answer and what actually worked for my problem, you might want to change the password for the pi user, so type sudo passwd pi otherwise you are just changing the password for root.


9

Do NOT type sudo passwd (unless you are trying to change the password of another user). The command to change your password is passwd


8

To set a root password: Boot up and login normally. Run:sudo passwd root Type in the new password for root as prompted Source: https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=91&t=5056&start=25


8

If you are using normal settings on Raspbian it will be in /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf. It is stored in plain text, but only root can see it - you will need sudo to access the file. See How do I set up networking/WiFi/Static IP for more detail.


8

As it turns out, you don't have to flash your RPi to recover from this. In fact, you don't need another Linux system at all, all you need is another SD card flashed with your RPi OS flavor of choice and a USB SD card reader to put your original SD card in. The init=/bin/sh method did not work for me (I think there was a display conflict with the custom ...


5

You don't have to create a temporary user on a different system to generate a password hash. You can do it without root access by running: openssl passwd -salt "salt" "password" That gives you the hash string (using CRYPT) which you'll need to somehow put in /etc/shadow file on the SD card. If you want to use a different hash function (...


5

Beware if you are using a German keyboard: In this case you have to use pi / raspberrz


5

The nullok option can be used with the pam_unix.so and not the pam_env.so. If pam_unix is installed in your Pi (most probably, it is), then this line will do the trick auth required pam_unix.so nullok EDIT: I just found some time to play around. I managed to make it work. Given that all the settings in sshd and pam.d are ok, you need to manually ...


5

Unfortunately, as pointed out by goldilocks, you cannot get the text of your old password. You can, however, reset your password by booting directly into the root shell (assuming you have physical access to the RPi). I've had to do this a couple times because of my own poor password keeping practices.... Step 1: Insert RPi SD Card Into Another Computer ...


5

root user on Raspbian doesn't have a valid password at all. This is an intentional security measure which prevents someone from logging in as root to your board. Raspbian comes with a default pi user who has a password raspberry; once you change that password your RPi gets some basic security. Having a default root password would require you to change ...


5

That file is not on rpi 3 you are trying to connect to, but on the computer where you are trying to connect from (Ubuntu?). Just run ssh-keygen -f "/root/.ssh/known_hosts" -R 192.168.1.234 on your computer. Not on the rpi.


4

you may easily recreate any user by connecting your SD card to any linux computer where you have root access, then edit /etc/passwd, /etc/shadow and /etc/group files to add the corresponding line. you may even use your RasPi for that purpose, provided you have another SD card to boot from and USB SD card reader to insert the broken one into the USB slot.


4

Raspbian does NOT have a root password. It differs from Ubuntu in that respect. You can create a root password, but AFAIK that requires sudo. The best bet is to edit the files by mounting the SD Card on a Linux machine. This can be done on the Pi if 1. you have a SD Card reader 2. You use a good OS on another SD to boot the Pi.


4

You cannot because the password is not stored anywhere. Secure passwords systems use a one way hash algorithm. Such an algorithm will always produce the same output given the same input, but it is not reversible -- there is no way to turn that output back into the input. This is what makes such password systems secure. It means, for example, if someone ...


4

As RetroPie is built upon Raspbian most commands that work on Raspbian will work on RetroPie. So to change the password for the logged in user use the passwd command and follow the prompts. You mention wanting to change the username, but don't explain why. Without a good reason I would not suggest this. A better alternative may be to create a new user using ...


4

I also thought I forgot the password, but I found I never changed it. The default password is 'p@ssw0rd'. The key to remember is you have to include the machine name in the username field. For example... 'minwinpc\Administrator' To answer the specific question though, I don't believe you can recover the password if you have changed it and forgot it.


4

The hashed password is stored in /etc/shadow. There is no efficient way to find out what the password is, by design. However, it is easy to reset as long as you have physical access. Start a Linux on a computer. It can be an installed Linux or a Live Linux on a PC, or it can be a Linux on a PI. Find the line with the password of the PI in the /etc/shadow of ...


4

Put the data you're trying to protect on a separate partition and encrypt it. Typical users will want to encrypt /home. You could also encrypt the root partition itself, though that will be more difficult to set up and maintain. On an encrypted machine, the person who gains physical access will only be able to see the unencrypted data. In case of root ...


3

Connect the SD to a PC running Linux (even a LiveCD distribution - you don't need to install it on your hdd) add pi:x:1000:1000:,,,:/home/pi:/bin/bash to etc/passwd (not /etc of your Linux, but the root of the card, it may be /media/sdb/etc/passwd or something like this depending on your distribution) if it isn't there, or edit it to match the above if ...


3

To setup a username and password with motion, you need to edit motion configuration file. Steps Open terminal Type sudo nano /etc/motion/motion/conf Add in a new line stream_auth_method 1 Add in a new line stream_authentication username:password Ctrl + X Press Y, Press Enter


3

netcam_userpass is to connect motion to a webcam that is protected by a username and password. This can happen for instance, if you are running a webcam program on a cellphone and have set a username/pass there. In order to protect your motion cam to the outside internet, you'd need to setup either an Apache or Nginx proxy to a cgi program (mjprox) that ...


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