New answers tagged

1

Running different versions of python is not an issue of the hardware, means version of a Raspberry Pi. It is an issue of the version of the Raspbian distribution. A specific python version is integrated into the distribution with its shared libraries and tested that it runs there without dependency and version problems. Raspbian Stretch comes with python 3.5,...


3

I'm curious what you might be encountering, because I have installed the latest versions of Raspbian on my oldest RPi devices and I haven't experienced any issues. Supported Python Versions can be found here: enter link description here


0

If you happen to be trying this with a Raspberry Pi 4 using Balena to deploy a Docker container, try writing these settings to the config.txt file before first boot. Note the frequency is different to the answer above, 100980000 instead of 109244953. hdmi_ignore_edid=0xa5000080 hdmi_group=2 hdmi_mode=87 disable_overscan=1 hdmi_timings=1920 0 88 44 148 720 0 ...


1

There is NOTHING to reset if you do a fresh installation. Do NOT use NOOBS install Raspbian. If you install using Etcher (as recommended) this will verify the image after copying. It is quite likely (if you have been using the same SD Card since the Pi2) that the SD Card is worn out - I suggest a new SD Card. See The Boot Problems Sticky if you want to ...


1

One of the most error prone issues is to use deprecated etc/rc.local. Please take note that using /etc/rc.local has limitations due to Compatibility with SysV. Following the recommendation of the developers from systemd you should avoid using it. We have seen many problems on this site if using it. An important note is the last sentence in the linked ...


2

On the first RPi : In a first terminal : (create FIFO) mkfifo /tmp/audio.fifo.pi1 In a second terminal : (Write datas into FIFO) arecord /tmp/audio.fifo.pi1 readfifo-writeUART.py : pyserial short-intro #!/usr/bin/python # readfifo-writeUART.py import serial def do_work(data): with serial.Serial() as ser: ser.baudrate = 19200 ser....


0

I did a fresh install of Kivy and rewrote the code step by step to find the issue. The reason why the Kivy app hanging forever was the line: eventlet.monkey_patch() Once commented out Kivy was up and running with Flask in parallel.


1

If unconfigured GPIO pins are Inputs, so safe for a logic input 0 - 3.3V If Output and opposite voltage is applied they can be damaged - which is why you should use a series resistor to limit current to a safe level.


0

This is not a direct answer to the Flask blocking Kivy and vice versa issue but is an alternative solution. I gave it a try with process and seems it does the work. Hope it helps. CODE #!/usr/bin/python2.7 python2.7 # -*- coding: utf-8 -*- # kivy modules first, if not Kivy may cause problems import kivy from kivy.app import App from kivy.lang import ...


0

thanks a lot for the reference. Cool stuff, I'll have a look. Meanwhile, I found a way to start reading the TFMini signal. I'm using the following script: ser = serial.Serial( port="/dev/ttyUSB0", baudrate = 115200, parity=serial.PARITY_NONE, stopbits=serial.STOPBITS_ONE, bytesize=serial.EIGHTBITS, timeout=1 ) ...


0

Here is some working code which waits for a sysfs interrupt. Please note the preconditions assumed by the code which are noted in the comments. As an aside please note that the sysfs interface is deprecated and has been removed from some Linux kernels. If you are writing a new library I suggest you use the /dev/gpiochip interface instead. /* 2014-07-06 ...


0

Looks like it may have been a USB bandwidth problem. Streaming two webcams at the same time may be beyond the RPi 2's capability, and it would explain why it worked on a laptop. That would also explain why dropping the resolution would allow it to work.


Top 50 recent answers are included