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That automake process is not necessarily the cause of the problem, it may instead be mostly a symptom. 99% IO is now being used by [kworker/u8:0+flush-179:0] which seemingly doesn't make any sense First, WRT iotop, the IO column shows the percentage of the process's running time that is currently spent waiting on IO.1 So 99% for one (or some, or all) ...


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Since you know the PID of the offending process (4076), you should find out what started it. Run ps -aef --forest (as root, because it's a root process) and search for the PID in the process tree. The keyword automake suggests it could be a software package being installed from source code. Unless you observe this behavior right after a reboot, check out ...


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The error was of "wpa_supplicant.txt". It should be "wpa_supplicant.conf". Thank you @JaromandaX


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The (very) small WiFi antenna on the Pi makes it susceptible to interference. Other, distant SSIDs on that channel may not hear the Pi and talk over it. Also, if there are networks that aren't on the set channel but do overlap it, the traffic there becomes simple interference and may also drown out the Pi. Use a WiFi analyzer (there is at least one free ...


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I came across this while following the same guide and ran in to the same issue where pps is enabled and working (via the ppstest tool) but chrony was not picking it up as a valid source. The fix for me was even though the pps socket is supposed to be autodetected, it wasn't unless I specifically added it. This also made PPS "work" in the gpsmon and ...


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I use openfortivpn too. install with: apt install openfortivpn start with: sudo openfortivpn [forticlienthost] --username=[user]


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You can also the rfkill command to disable or enable the Wi-Fi interface(s). This is how the interface is disabled by Raspbian with a new installation before the country has been configured in the Wi-Fi settings (e.g using raspi-config). You can disable the Wi-Fi interface(s): sudo rfkill block wifi Enable it like this: sudo rfkill unblock wifi And check ...


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I used the SCM Micro SCL3711 reader under Linux with libnfc (NFC Forum Type 2 Tag) and nfcpy (NFC Forum Type 3 Tag) to emulate NDEF Tags


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I managed to get this to work with a workaround by replacing iptables with iptables-legacy (mainly to get ufw working) You will need to do the following: sudo touch /run/xtables.lock sudo chmod a+r /run/xtables.lock Easier to perform the next steps as root sudo su - root The following will move the iptables app that not working and copy the working legacy ...


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You are using old deprecated settings for WiFi. I don't know where do you get this. With Raspberry Pi OS, WiFi is working out of the box. You only have to use the right settings. I suggest you start over again with a fresh flashed Raspberry Pi OS image of your choice. Then follow the official documentation for Wireless connectivity in the Raspberry Pi ...


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The problem is caused by the line range(100) and None which is causing your loop to exit. You need to remove it. Where did it come from? It's not in the docs. If you want to loop 100 times, change the while True: to for i in range(100): Also it's probably just the way you pasted in the code here but your first line is indented, just make sure it isn't ...


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The channels are set by your wireless access point, and the country you live in. USA only has 12 distinct channels. Some countries have 14... not in USA. You can set you WAP to 3 distinct channel spaces & not compete or overlap with a neighbor. 1, 6 or 12 give you the widest ranges with fewest chances of overlap. It is something you have to play with ...


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You can try to use systemd-networkd that do not need additional helper programs which all must respect your uncommon network mask. You can set it in one configuration file and it should do. You can look at Setting up a Raspberry Pi as an access point - the easy way how to do it. You have to use section ♦ Setting up an access point and with eth0, with NAT (...


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I tried the package from plinth666 but the raster wasn't quite proper and the print timing waas quiet long. I used then a bunch of free code from Epson, a PPD file from another printer and modify them to produce this new package: https://github.com/groolot/epson-tm-t88v-driver Better rasterization, cash drawer and buzzer, all is operational. Hope that ...


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In case anyone had the same problem, I had the same situation: using 3.5" LCD and MFRC522 at the same time. LCD driver is this and MFRC522 driver is this. I added this line at the end of config.txt and it worked! It seems LCD driver claims GPIO7 & GPIO8 pins. dtoverlay=spi1-3cs,cs0_pin=05,cs1_pin=06,cs2_pin=16


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Now the "Obsolescence Statement" is specified on product`s page (almost in the bottom): RPI 3B https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-3-model-b/ "Raspberry Pi 3 Model B will remain in production until at least January 2026" RPI 3B+ https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-3-model-b-plus/ "Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ will remain in ...


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This is the culprit: This HDMI-to-VGA converter (the only object I have not changed during my many tests, and thanks to @Ingo for having opened my eyes on this) does not allow the automatic recognition of the monitor by the Raspberry. To solve the problem, I proceeded as described in this post. Precisely, Since I use Raspbian, I accessed the boot partition ...


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Don't know why you are following this method Easier way is installing drivers once on clean image and clone that image. So whenever you flash the cloned image to new sd card it will already have the driver


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