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In such a case it's recommended to go "one level lower" and to use a diagnostic utility like the gpio program, which comes with the wiringPi library. See the manpage on how to use it. To find out the logic levels of your GPIO pins, you can use the piscope utility. If it also hangs whilst trying to access the GPIO pin with the LED attached, a ...


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in boot/config.txt string hdmi_force_hotplug=1 change on #hdmi_force_hotplug=1


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There is a libprocessing-core-java package in Raspbian/RpiOS, but the current version is 1.2.1-2 for both the 32-bit and 64-bit Buster repos. I don't think you specially need to install java 7 for this. The default JRE/JDK (8 on 32-bit and 11 on 64-bit) should be fine. If you want to download a precompiled Processing newer than the distro version, use the &...


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These games were not designed to to be played full screen on an HD tv. The image will come out all stretched and horrible. They play the best in their native resolution.


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This instruction helped me https://learn.adafruit.com/circuitpython-on-raspberrypi-linux/i2c-clock-stretching. Try to do this


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You can only control two servos independently with the Pi's hardware PWM. GPIO 12/18 share a channel. GPIO 13/19 share a channel. The same settings apply to GPIO which share a channel. E.g. If servo1 is on GPIO12 and servo2 on GPIO18 they will get the same signal (same frequency, same pulsewidth). pigpio supports the hardware PWM features of the Pi. So you ...


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To download previous versions of Raspberry Pi Imager (starting from v1.2), check out the Releases page on the rpi_imager GitHub site: https://github.com/raspberrypi/rpi-imager/releases Click the "assets" tab to see the available downloads.


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import serial b = open("/home/pi/20", "wb") byte=port.read() num_byte+=1 while True: if byte== b'\x10': x = port.read(1) if x== b'\x03': #b.write(b'\x10x\03') ...


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I've just tested the setup on my Zero W board: fed it with 3.28V directly through 3V3 GPIO pin, and left 5V pin unconnected. Looks like it somehow works quite well: under CPU stress test it draws 0.5A from the external power supply, and temperature of the voltage regulator stabilizes at 33°C (with core temp reaching 57°C). From the schematics it looks like ...


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As a minimum you should be discussing this with your IT support at work. Never trust free advice from the Internet where security and privacy is involved :-) Saying that, here is my free advice: The simplest way would be to use a broker based on the Internet that you can reach both from home and work. A search will turn up a few free ones (I like Adafruit ...


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It will get power from the power supply you have plugged in to the Pi. As long as the Pi is powered 3V3 will be supplied to pins 1 and 17 and 5V will be supplied to pins 2 and 4. The GPIO will also receive power from the 3V3 supply. Each GPIO also has internal pulls. Some GPIO default to pulls to 3V3, others default to pulls to ground. GPIO 17 default to ...


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Just a short walkthrough based on Milliways' answer for raspbian buster (2021): cat /etc/os-release nano /boot/overlays/README sudo nano /boot/config.txt dtoverlay=act-led,gpio=17 sudo reboot (For the power led you can simply use a 3.3V pin)


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The Pi 3 is protected by the SMBJ5.0A over-voltage suppressor, which has a breakdown voltage between 6.4 and 7.1V. So above 7.1V you are guaranteed to trigger the over-voltage protection. If the protection works as designed, you'll see no smoke: the polyfuse will limit the current to a safe value. However, 7.1V is above the rated maximum voltage of 5V ...


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The Pi is rated at 5.0 ± 0.25V. The PMIC (on modern Pi) has a MAXIMUM input of 5.5V - exceed this at your peril. The "protection" circuitry consists of a combination of polyfuse, ideal diode and surge limiting diode, which varies on model (consult schematics for detail). The Pi3A+ has no ideal diode. Schematics for most models are available. See ...


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A pulse width of 1500 µs moves the horn to the centre. You can call that any angle you want, say 0. For each 10 µs decrease in pulse length the servo moves one degree clockwise. For each 10 µs increase in pulse length the servo moves one degree counter clockwise. These figures are approximate and vary by servo model. The servo will have angle limits. If ...


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I have a Raspberry Pi running with a PCM1803 Board that has an I2S Interface and seems to be similar to this PCM1802 Board. The difference is that my board has a Clock Generator included. So you need a Clock Generator - maybe by programming the GPCLK of the Raspberry Pi.


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