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Check your scanner's "idVendor" and "idProduct" values with a lsusb command. Add a udev rule ATTRS{idVendor}=="04a9", ATTRS{idProduct}=="1908", MODE="0664", GROUP="scanner", ENV{libsane_matched}="yes" Reload udev with sudo udevadm control --reload-rules. Add your userid (I'm assuming you're logging in as pi) to the scanner group sudo groupadd scanner and ...


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The Tutorial you used is not up to date as it was written in 2013 and seems to be written for normal Ubuntu not Ubuntu Core. I never used Ubuntu Core but they seem to use systemd-networkd: By default network management on Ubuntu Core is handled by systemd's networkd and netplan. While NetworkManager has some support to handle netplan configuration ...


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If you're trying to make a call using ATD, ATA or ATS0 commands, bear in mind that these commands instruct the modem to make a call using its own audio inputs/outputs. They will work as expected if your modem is a mobile phone (and you will be able to speak to / hear the other side using the phone), but they will do nothing on a device which provides only ...


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Ok, so I finally fixed it (thanks to everyone) :) I deleted everything in /boot, replaced it with the contents of my backup, and added the kernel modules from my backup to /lib/modules. It entered me into emergency mode, then I did the sequence: apt-get update apt-get remove raspberrypi-kernel apt-get install raspberrypi-kernel reboot Now, I have the ...


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I suppose you have completely setup and running Building a 'Packet squirrel" using Raspberry Pi you have linked in your question. It is using systemd-networkd. If you want to extend it with WiFi you also have to use systemd-networkd, in particular to use *.network configuration files. So try this and add setup wpa_supplicant in addition to the existing ...


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wiringPi does not support I2C slave mode. It only supports using the Raspberry Pi as an I2C bus master. This in part is because wiringPi uses the underlying Linux I2C driver which only supports master mode.


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There is a fork of unclutter which can be instructed to hide the cursor on a touch event. When called with a -touch argument, it hides the cursor instantly on a touch input, and displays it again on a mouse move. Alternatively, you can write a udev rule and execute your own script which hides the cursor (using unclutter or otherwise, e.g. xinput -cursor /...


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