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You COULD use a linear regulator if you have a large enough heatsink because any linear regulator will dissipate lots of heat. Whether the voltage would be stable and sufficiently clean depends on the circuitry you put around the regulator. I wouldn't use a linear regulator switch mode power supplies are preferable. PS I don't know why you would want to ...


1

O help, just found out here what went wrong. I've been having trouble with this too. The answer was inside this command: sudo wpa_supplicant -c/etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf -iwlan0 -d I had placed the ssid and psk names between ' 'signs like ssid='my-network-ssid' Changing it to "my-network-ssid" made it work right away. And besides: raspi-...


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Just some general information first to understand the different setups. In the first setup you have an access point on the RasPi with interface wlan0 that can other devices connect by WiFi. The wired interface eth0 is connected as uplink to the internet router, no matter if it also has an access point. That isn't used in this case. The RasPi is an access ...


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If you look at https://packages.microsoft.com/debian/10/prod/pool/main/m/msodbcsql17/, you will see that the only platform they support is AMD64. There are no packages for ARM. BTW, don't just state that you followed the tutoral next time you ask a question, cite the actual steps you took. The tutorial in question cannot be followed to the letter because ...


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You might look into the AWS IoT Greengrass service. The Greengrass framework is specifically geared towards this type of architecture. The RasPi would be a IoT Greengrass Core device, and the ESP32s would be local IoT devices that communicate on the local network with the RasPi. The RasPi can be intermittently connected to the internet to transfer data ...


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"pi-ap" automates configuration of your Pi into a wireless AP. You can use the "pi-ap" scripts which are tested and proven to produce a working Pi wireless Access Point for comparative analysis with your own (broken) config. They're just a pile of bash scripts called in turn by the install.sh script. Things not obvious are well commented: https://github....


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First some general information to get an idea what to do. As you already have found there are in general two ways to configure a Virtual Private Network: a bridged setup on OSI Layer 2 and a routed setup on OSI Layer 3. Nowadays we have mainly two VPN programs that are mostly used: the modern and up comming Wireguard and meanwhile classic OpenVPN. I would ...


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I encountered the same problem: RPi3B and Geekworm X850 mSATA SSD Extension Board V 3.1 an a Sunbow mSATA 32GB: Everything works as expected. RPi3B+ and Geekworm X850 mSATA SSD Extension Board V 3.1 an a Sunbow mSATA 32GB: No Wifi regardless of the booting device (SD or SSD) unless the SSD has no power connection (via USB or external). Powering up the ...


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It wouldn't so much be the ambient temperature that would be the issue, but the CPU operating temperature. At higher ambient temperatures and lower differential temperatures, it is more difficult to remove generated heat. CPU load will also be a factor. So the question is really "Can the CPU temperature be kept below the max rated 85℃?" At 80℃ ambient ...


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Will you "be able to operate with an ambient temperature of between 50℃ to 80℃"? The Pi itself will work, but without cooling will get warmer and begin to throttle back clock speed to keep its temperature in a safe range. For the 3B+ the default soft limit is 60°C See https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/raspberrypi/frequency-management.md ...


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There is a python library called odrive which I used to control odrive from my pc. I decided to use Arduino instead so no problem for now.


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PHP 5 is no longer supported. You could use PHP 7 instead: sudo apt install libapache2-mod-php7.3


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Always have multiple known good quality power supplies, and good cables (high current rated, and preferably short) , and try several of them first. Also know that power supplies which worked perfectly for year(s) can an do go bad -- they still look like they work in majority in cases, but at higher load their voltage drops below 4.75V even for a shor time, ...


2

RPi is also sensitive to voltage at any time below 5V. In addition to quality - this is one reason the official supplies are also about 5.19V. Even RPi without USB peripherals but under heavy load can pull enough current to "brown out" (to the RPi) the voltage below 5.0 V. A spontaneous reboot is more a sign of voltage supply drops as the RPi will throttle ...


1

Here's a quote from a reply that Logitech gave regarding the power consumption of their webcams: [On] C310, power consumption can be anything from 50mA idle to all 500mA for streaming video. It's quite typical for USB 2.0 devices to aim at always being under the 500mA power budget, which is a maximum that a fully compliant device can draw. So I think it'...


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This seems to be a rather basic issue: your system is configured to provide a login shell (and possibly kernel boot messages) over the UART. You need to disable it in order to use the serial for your own purposes. This can be done using sudo raspi-config (go to Advanced Functions - Serial and select "No" to disable the shell over the serial port), then ...


9

No one is mentioning that the Maximum total USB peripheral current draw on a rpi 3b+ is 1.2A (power requirements) Having said that your current psu is enough. If the cameras are indeed drawing more than 600mA each (which I really find it hard to believe, unless they are dodgy) you should start exploring the option of a powered usb hub.


5

In the absence of any quantitative observations, the community can only guess. What is the current rating for the power supply? Perhaps a power supply with more current can solve the problem if the cameras need more current than what is available. If only one attached camera does not cause a reset, then, the current (amperage) is in all likeliness the ...


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Does anyone know of a way to download motioneyeos without using Win32DiskImager or Etcher? Download this file - motioneyeos-raspberrypi3-20190911.img.xz then follow procedure of this link: MotionEyeOS Installation. Is it possible to download motioneyeos into raspbian? Yes. Follow the procedure: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install motion ...


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Finally Switched to SanDisk USB 3.0 Flash Drive. Thank you guys. All you have to do is.. Use Etcher to Burn to USB. And Open boot/config.txt and add this line to beginning of the file. program_usb_boot_mode=1 And save the file. Plug In to Raspberry Pi and Enjoy 😋


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I couldn't get wiringPi to work in my IoT edge module. What I ended up doing is using "onoff" as my GPIO node module instead of wiringPi. const BME280 = require("bme280-sensor"); Gpio = require("onoff").Gpio; const LED_RED = new Gpio(LEDPin, "out"); Hope it helps.


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The Raspberry Pi 3B + supports USB 2.0 specification which allows for transfer speeds up to 480Mbit/s or 60MByte/s. USB flash drives can reach up 33MBytes/s, but there seem to be some limitations in the NAND itself so it will come down to the type of stick you get. However, the sd-card bus speed can reach up to 20MB/s read on the raspberry pi. So, the ...


3

You are using a Raspberry Pi 3B+. This model supports booting from an USB storage device instead of a SD Card out of the box. Just flash the USB flash drive as you do with a SD Card, put it into an USB port and be sure you do not have an SD Card inserted. Otherwise it would boot first from the SD Card. For details look at USB mass storage boot.


4

I've been doing it for years and currently have a Pi2, Pi3 and Pi4 booting from external USB HDDs. The main advantages are bigger capacity and reliability, I've found SD cards easily get ruined by power interruptions but not the USB HDDs


3

The memory installed on a Raspberry Pi is directly soldered and is not intended to be replaced or extended. Looking on the web, while there are quite a few posts asking for a method to add RAM, all that I could see indicate its not reasonably feasible. I'm sure it could be done with specialized equipment and components however the outcomes of the process of ...


1

Just by looking at the folder name I see that you got an x86_64 version of the software, and it's very unlikely that you got it using sudo apt-get install blender. All Raspberries have an ARM CPU and cannot run x86 code without an emulator (and this is most probably not what you want). Get an armhf version of the software. If you wonder how that strange ...


0

Raspberry Pi4 UART The Pi4 has 4 additional UART (uart2-uart5) in addition to uart0/1 on the older Pi (only one of which can be used as they share GPIO). Functionally these are equivalent to the fully featured PL011 UART on uart0 and can optionally be configured with CTS/RTS. These can be enabled (by editing /boot/config.txt), but this requires careful ...


0

It's better if you ask this question on another SE Site which is related to security. Although, as @Modeset said, the IT man of the university can see which connected device tried brute force attack because of the packets statistic, etc. Because the raspberry pi shares the internet (I mentioned hotspot) and sends all wifi client's data as itself IP address ...


0

The accepted answer in this post actually give the right procedure to install LIRC: You need to copy the default configuration file into the right place: sudo cp /etc/lirc/lirc_options.conf.dist /etc/lirc/lirc_options.conf Please note that this only allows to install LIRC on Raspberry Pie (Buster) without error but I cannot guaranty that you won't have to ...


2

I see three possibilities as to what's happening here. Somebody got unauthorized login access to your PI and used it to make attacks. I suggest checking for rootkits and the like. Somebody is using the wifi to make attacks. It probably looks your PI because you probably are doing NAT. It could actually be an authorized user's compromised laptop. I ...


1

This is my answer based on how I've read your situation: If your ethernet port got blocked by your IT sysadmin because it was being used for brute forcing SSH/some other malicious behaviour, then it's likely one of your WiFi users started to abuse your service. It's not out of the realms of possibility that somebody complained they were getting excess / ...


2

Pin 1 is 3.3V power, and can supply up to 800mA (although it is inadvisable to connect a pump to the supply - particularly without any protection). Pin 3 is a GPIO - if programmed as an output it can supply a maximum of 16mA. By default it will supply ~2mA (because it has a 1.8kΩ pullup) - neither is capable of running any kind of motor. Also connecting any ...


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