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I am presently trying to install Orca on a RPI4, and have a strange problem. When I open a terminal session, every time I hit an 's' I hear "Speech Enabled" or "Speech Disabled" but I can't actually get an 's' on the command line. Makes it very hard to type 'sudo' or any other command. Any idea why I have this behavior? And, how to ...


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NOOBS is past its use-by date. It was, probably a good idea when it was introduced as you only need to be able to unzip and copy files to get a bootable SDCard. Now there's Balena Etcher and the RPimager. Etcher will take a downloaded still zipped image file, unzip it, write it to the SDCard and verify it. RPimager does the same but also includes a menu to ...


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As you can see the additional ethernet device on the USB hub is detected with interface enx2c16dba05ff7 on the RasPi. Now it is a routing issue what interface is preferred and preference may vary depending on the order the interfaces are detected. On boot up interface enx2c16dba05ff7 is preferred before eth0, when plugged in later, eth0 is already ...


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I agree. I wouldn't trust more than a couple of amps through the copper traces of the typical modules incorporating the PCA9685 chip. Separate power supplies will work. Remember you will still need to connect the PCA9685 module ground to the power supply/servo ground. As an aside my pigpio library will generate suitable servo pulses direct from the Pi.


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The tutorial states you cannot use the USB ports and wifi on the pi 4. If you want to use windows on it you would have to buy a type C to type A converter that would look like this: You could then use a USB hub to connect multiple USB devices. You would then have to supply power through the GPIO Pins. Here's what the person in the tutorial did:


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Have you ruled out IP address conflict - some other computer on your network using the same IP address as the Pi? "Connection reset" is often a symptom of IP address conflict. For example, you could run Wireshark on your Windows host and watch the MAC addresses of the packets using the 10.0.1.175 address.


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Yes, you can partition an SSD. If you're using Windows you can use this guide to partition your SSD: https://www.wikihow.com/Partition-a-Drive-on-Windows You can then use a tool like Etcher to flash the .iso to the partition you created for your OS. You can use the other partition for normal storage.


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If you're okay with erasing all the apps and data on your SD Card a simple format of the SD Card and loading of the OS should work.


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A normal cell in an SD card should have a write of about 25 000 times (better for high quality, lower for bad quality). In addition, logic re-routes the used cells, and good quality cards have some additional room (sometimes up to 4G for a 16G card). Single level NAND on an SSD can have something between 50 000 and 100 000 writes. SSD's use the same kind of ...


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USB 2.0 has a maximum bandwidth of 480Mb/s, or 60MB/s although speeds closer to 30MB/s are common. The raspberry pi foundation says that any SD card will work and give examples of cards that operate at 4 and 10 MB/s so a USB 2.0 SSD should have sufficient speed.


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Well I now installed the 32bit image on my raspberry pi 4 (Raspberry Pi Imager from official website) and the program is even pre-isntalled. I read in github that the omxplayer is not yet shipped to 64bit arquitecture that was the image I was using (Debian Buster x64)


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Since the hardware aspects have been more or less answered (although I might suggest using a variable temperature controller instead of a relay), I will focus on software. The pi 4 has wifi built in, which you can configure on the sd card before putting it into the pi. You can look up libraries for the different sensors and controllers you buy, and create a ...


3

This is coming in late - you've likely resolved this by now & may be using it for some time. But just in case, I found a discussion thread in the RPi forum where some additional details on the OTG support provided in RPi4 were provided. Also, this "how-to guide" may be useful in getting this feature working on your RPi 4. These may be useful, ...


1

First off- I'm also rather new, so this answer might not be the best. I don't know much on the software side of things, but I think I can point you in the right direction with hardware. detecting the water temp- You'll want a temperature sensor for this, although the exact one I'm unsure of. You'll want it to be waterproof(I think) so you can submerge it in ...


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Make sure to run apt update with sudo: sudo apt update, and also to install all of your packages with sudo. If you haven't done it recently, also run sudo apt upgrade.


1

The Raspberry Pi Foundation does not guarantee speeds above the default 1.5GHz. Due to varying silicon qualities, some processors will overclock more than others. This is what the 'silicon lottery' is. So some processors will overclock to 2.147GHz, others 1.8GHz, or some might not even reach past 1.5GHz, like yours. So it looks like you've lost the silicon ...


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If you have a look in the /boot/overlays/README file you will see that the folk at RPF/RPT have tried to sort this out by actually renaming the file: This overlay has been renamed disable-bt Unfortunately, the internet never keeps up 😢 so you will not find a pi4-disable-bt option. You can continue to use the pi3 command but I would use the disable-bt ...


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I'm now certain there is an issue with the backpack or board. After further inspection, I noticed that the plastic insulation at the base of the ground pin on the backpack and on the LCD board appear to be damaged. It looks like it was shorted. It could have been me, but I doubt it as I was very careful in wiring, especially as I know the damage that can be ...


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An I2C Bus needs pullup resistors on the clock and on the data wire. If neither the raspi nor the Backpack attaches these pullups, the bus can not work correctly. Here is a good intro: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/i2c/i2c-at-the-hardware-level . I don't see any pullups in your schematics. Attention: The raspi does NOT tolerate 5V, so don't use 5V for ...


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followed vnc utorial and got it fixed thx for all the help.


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You can enable the bootloader debug output on the serial console. Maybe you will see what's wrong with the boot process and what the bootloader is missing. In the EEPROM of the Raspberry Pi 4B you can set a debug flag BOOT_UART=1 as described at Pi4 Bootloader Configuration. Then the bootloader will output low level debug information to the serial debug ...


2

I experienced the same issue. And found a working solution for me. Install the latest Raspberry PI OS from https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspberry-pi-os/ Write it to a SD card with an image writer tool. Put it in a Raspberry PI 3(B) and let it run. Run a full update: apt update && apt -y full-upgrade Shutdown the Raspberry PI 3(B) Put SD ...


2

I don't know if there is a library function to check if there is an access point created or not. But on the command line you can use iw or wpa_cli. iw is more generic, with wpa_cli you have to specify the interface name, but you can get more details if needed. rpi ~$ iw dev | grep 'type AP' type AP # or just check for the return code: rpi ~$ iw dev |...


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The third option (USB boot without SD-Card) for a Raspberry Pi 4B is stable since 2020-06-15. You can try to use it. Look at Why does Raspberry Pi 4 do not support USB boot?.


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Finally solved it ! I thought this was an issue and searched how to "fix" it but it is an intended behaviour. 20.04 solution (source [FR]): Install the pi-bluetooth package: sudo apt-get install pi-bluetooth Edit the /boot/firmware/usrcfg.txt file to add the following line at the end: include btcfg.txt Reboot: sudo reboot Check that the device ...


0

This is a baud rate problem. You're getting a lot of x and f characters which have ASCII codes of 01111000 and 01100110 - note all bits inside those are repeated twice. The effective baud rate of your Pi should be twice as low as what you think: if your terminal is set to 115200, try setting it to 57600. Perhaps reading the messages you're receiving (using ...


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Im facing similar issue trying to netboot Ubuntu Server 20.04. I eneded with connecting serial adapter to Pi - that gived me "keyboard". Also compiled u-boot from source (to get ethernet) - source: https://github.com/apritzel/u-boot Instructions: https://andrei.gherzan.ro/linux/uboot-on-rpi/


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Internal network adapter does not have the ability to work monitor mode. Please use an USB wifi dongle that can do this.


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If hardware loopback works, then it could be clock issue. When using the analog tv out via the 3.5 mm jack on the RasPi4, then the clock gets reduced (see the RasPi documentation about overclocking). The UART seems to work properly only with HDMI output.


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You need a computer with which you can read and write to the SD root filesystem (the second partition in Raspbian/RpiOS) for what I am suggesting. Read this about how to disable the root password. This would allow you to login root and make whatever changes, such as passwd --unlock pi.


2

Stall current is only one part of the story: the resulting undervoltage may crash the system, but it's not likely to do any damage to the hardware. However, a motor is an inductive load which will produce a (potentially) very high voltage when you switch it off. Incorrectly powering motors, relays, electromagnets, etc. is by far the most common reason of ...


6

The first thing to do is ignore the tutorial. You do not need to create a new user, but you definitely do need to change the default password. As far as "undoing" the command, you need to login to your Pi from the new account the tutorial writer had you create, and re-set the password for user pi. Once you're logged in as the other user (and ...


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I believe Dmitry's answer is correct and there is something in the I2C communication that's going wrong. However, since I'm still waiting for access to a logic analyzer, I took the easier and cheaper route of simply buying a second screen with SPI wiring. That one works flawlessly out of the box. Thus another "answer" is to avoid purchasing OLED ...


2

What temperature range is normal or... how hot is too hot? My Pi 4B's with a decent heat management system (I've used several varieties) will typically run in the mid to upper 30°C's to the low-mid 40°C's when either idle or under typical/normal workloads (not pegging the CPU cores). Anything under 50°C is great! It is possible to stay in this temperature ...


2

In that case you can use two more fans and detach that fan which is connected with pi. Find two processor fans of 12V and an adapter. Attach them in parallel. Put one on top and another on one side. You can make this more cool with this setting. ALso try to use an armor heat shrink.Liquid cooling is also a good option. 70D C is quite good. But try to keep ...


2

I would be quite happy powering that circuit from the Pi's 5V rail. You are not directly powering the motor, you are powering a L293D motor driver which in turn powers the motor. The L293D incorporates all the protection needed to prevent back EMF from reaching the Pi (back EMF may be caused when the motor is turned off or when it in manually turned).


1

If the temperature of a Pi4 rises this much, you either have a poor case with impaired circulation and/or have not installed latest firmware updates. It is simple to implement Fan control based on temperature. I use a heatsink case, and even running a stress test the temperature barely exceeded 60℃ See https://forum.core-electronics.com.au/t/how-to-stress-...


1

The problem is not because of the power supply given to the raspberry pi. The problem is with the amount of current the Pi itself is rated for. Yes the power supply of the Pi 4 can handle 3A of current but 3A of current is a lot of power to try and draw through the traces in the pcb of the Pi and considering it is only rated to 600mA passive draw with no ...


1

I ran for pretty much five days straight with a CanaKit 3.5A PS. Not really overclocked or anything, but lots of streaming. For the point of telling anyone who's looking for the answer, I was also running a HiFiBerry DAC+ (audio card) HAT with it, and the scripts for powering and the fan didn't conflict. I was worried about GPIO pin conflicts. I was ...


0

There are many ways of safely turning the Pi off without a display. You can still ssh and shutdown. I use dtoverlay=gpio-shutdown,gpio_pin=21 and when BCM 21 (pin 40) is connected to Gnd the Pi shuts down. See https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/a/77918/8697 for detailed description. NOTE that the risk of powering the Pi off it greatly exaggerated. It CAN ...


1

I had this same issue; it turned out to be a weak power supply for the pi4. After using a type-C laptop charger, the issue went away.


1

It's implied here that the Pi is on the same power as the camera and hence will have it cut without a proper shutdown first. That is a bad idea, and that is the real problem you have to solve -- you either have to operate it such that you do a clean shutdown before you turn the tractor off, or incorporate some circuitry to allow it to continue to run off the ...


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This is more speculative than anything... but on my 4 GB rpi4 model and a few others are having this issue as well, the HDMI has some random interference with the Wifi, particularly if you're connected to a 2.4 G band. Some are saying it gets better if you switch your HDMI cord out, some say the power connected causes it, others you say it clears up when you ...


0

You can only control a fan with additional circuitry. See https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/a/105820/8697 for an example. Pins 4 & 6 are DIRECTLY connected to the input 5V supply so cannot be controlled by the Pi. However if you remove power to the Pi they should NOT have any voltage. If the fan continues to run you have NOT removed power - this can ...


3

On my Pi 4, it's: console=serial0,115200 console=tty1 root=PARTUUID=XXXXXXXX-02 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline fsck.repair=yes rootwait quiet splash plymouth.ignore-serial-consoles Your PARTUUID will not be the same as mine (which is why I X'd it out). Instead, use: cat /etc/fstab Note the PARTUUID for the root partition (ext4) and that's the value ...


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You can use systemd-networkd to simply configure the wired ethernet interface. Please follow to Use systemd-networkd for general networking. You can just use section ♦ Quick Step there and then come back here. To configure the eth0 interface, create this file: rpi ~$ cat > /etc/systemd/network/04-wired.network <<EOF [Match] Name=e* [Network] Address=...


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The Foundation has extensive documentation See Access Point


1

There are 3.3V and 5V Pins on the Raspberry Pi that remain on as long as the Pi is being given power. GPIO Pinout and other info here. You can use one of these to control your relay, without the need for writing code.


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I reinstalled the Raspberry Pi OS and it worked, I don't even know why it stopped working in the first place


1

Errno 121 means (besides using a wrong address, which is not your case) that the slave didn't expect the command you have sent and didn't acknowledge it properly. This often happens if the master transmits extra bytes or not enough bytes by mistake. The easiest way to debug this would be to connect a logic analyzer or a scope capable of I2C decoding to the ...


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