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14

There are several notable differences between the RPi A, and A+. According to the official release, the differences are as follows: An expanded GPIO header. The A+ has 40 pins which considerably larger than the original 26. Additionally, the new form factor and I2C compatibility allow standard Raspberry Pi hats to be used with the A+ model. MicroSD. The A+ ...


6

Yes, the Lite version of Raspbain 9 "Stretch" uses systemd just like 8 "Jessie". Also I highly recomend using systemd over other options.


5

The raspberry pi A+ is smaller, so you can fit it in smaller spaces. It depends on what I was doing, but I would probably choose the A+, given it has more GPIO pins.


3

That is not so good. So the 3.3V power pin from the RPi is connected to the breadboard's top-most rail via a red jumper (note this isn't actually used by the rest of the circuit but I don't believe it harms anything, right? Correct, it is pointless that way. When my software (running on the RPi) fires a signal to the buzzer via GPIO output pin, the ...


2

Use the program Etcher with a so-called image file. All your settings , installed programs and documents will be saved if you do a proper shutdown from the "Start" menu (it is called something else on Raspbian , but you get the idea). Get image files for "Raspbian Stretch Desktop ZIP" here . I strongly recommend Raspbian , it is the best supported distro ...


2

I assume that the calculation for the resistor is the same with pushbuttons as it is for LEDs. Your assumption is mixing input and output. I have just explained what the difference between input and output is here: RPi 1 Model A input/output pin ratings And the reason for a pull-up/pull-down is that a GPIO pin without these can be in an "unknown state" ...


2

You seem to have several misconceptions going into the question, so let me start with those: You can put the resistor on either leg of an LED in general, as long as they are in series. I'm not sure why you think otherwise. In a closed loop, the total resistance along the loop determines the current. For both the switch and the LED the resistor is there to ...


2

There is some considerations: A maximum of 16mA per GPIO with the total current from all GPIOs not exceeding 50mA. Calculate the resistance, its the limiter for the current. Normal data for a red LED: ~1.8 volt, 20mAmpere (0,02A) U = 3.3V - 1.8V = 1.5V R = U / I 1.5V/0.02A = 75 ohm And regarding the schematic, this is working, your a bit turned around.


2

If the monitor supports RCA, then any male to male RCA will work. The colours are irrelevant, they're just there so you know which end corresponds to the other end of the cable. The device outputs video through one line, left speaker through another, and right through another. As long as the receiving device gets the the right signal to the write port, the ...


2

From your picture and description it's clear there is no SD-Card in the proper slot on the back side of the RPi. While actual RPi 3 can be made to boot from Usb there is no chance for your model, so put the SD card in the proper slot before trying anything else.


2

No , Etcher alone cannot accomplish this. The following will , though (listed in ascending order of complexity/flexibility) : PiBakery pi-gen chroot + qemu-user-static The last option only works on Linux but will enable you to "jump into" an image file , use apt-get , change configuration files etc.


1

Strange that you have such a hard time finding one, I did use a search engine with "piezo 15mA" and the first two hits where 15mA/1.5volt piezo buzzers. And a caution, your circuit can break your Raspberry, since the total power consumption can supersede the total for a Raspberry Pi. The solution that makes sense is secure is a transistor and a couple of ...


1

When a GPIO set as an input has no definite voltage attached it is said to be floating and will randomly return 0 or 1. The purpose of the internal pull-ups and pull-downs is to stop a GPIO set as an input from floating by connecting to ground (pull-down) or 3V3 (pull-up). That means it will return a consistent result until overridden by such as a button ...


1

Connecting the left to the right will do the bypass that you want, in the sense that it will change this into a "simple" on-off switch. That's the first part of the answer. Now as to which should be connected to GND and which to GPIO, that depends on whether your signal is high or low. You still seem confused about how inputs work at a very basic level. (...


1

LEDs need a current limiting resistor. here is a answer how to calculate the resistor How to get started with basic Raspberry Pi electronics? Buttons. Look here https://www.raspberrypi.org/learning/physical-computing-with-python/trafficlights/ Buzzer, the GPIO can deliver 3,3volt, 16mA and the buzzer is a 6volt, 45mA device. Both the voltage and the ...


1

As the model A supports back-powering through the USB port, you will bypass the fuses. So it is not a good idea in general. BUT. As long as you do not connect other devices to GPIO and as your only USB port is occupied, you will hardly run into the situation that you route too much power through your Pi. So to my best knowledge your Pi will be save but ...


1

Answer: Yes! Raspberry Pi Zero and Raspberry Pi 1A supports USB gadgets/OTG. Raspberry Pi 1B, Raspberry Pi 2, Raspberry Pi 3 have USB hubs integrated and cant utilize USB gadgets/OTG. USB gadgets/OTG is that you change the USB port from being a "USB host" to be a "USB client". Ref.: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_On-The-Go


1

There is different ways of connecting to the pi. You can use a usb to uart (serial) interface to communicate. Here is a good tutorial about how to use it. It's for the Pi Zero, but I assume it could be used for the pi 1 as well. Also, you can configure the pi to appear as a ethernet device. It's explained here. For me, the best way to do it is to connect ...


1

The GPIO hardware peripheral is identical on all current Pi models. The GPIO are all 3V3. This means you should not expose them to a voltage outside the range 0 to 3.3V. When set as an input the GPIO will be seen as a very high resistance. It will only use a few microamps to register as low or high. When set as an output the current you can draw whilst ...


1

Lets first define what a input vs a output is. Input is measuring if there is any voltage coming in or not on the GPIO pin. Output is driving a load to either to a high voltage, 3.3V or zero voltage. The load can be maximum 16mA. So when you measure (input) a voltage on a GPIO the only thing you have to consider is not to exceed 3.3 volt, the current is ...


1

You might want to look at resin.io. They offer docker based raspberry pi os that you can install on your pi as a one off - then deploy and deploy your application by building a docker image which gets pushed to the pi - no need to reboot the pi or even touch it after the initial install, everything can be done over the network. The basic workflow they offer ...


1

If you are looking for a testing platform, you should ideally use a bare bone window manager(like i3) to allow for best ram allotment to the JVM and application. Otherwise I would recommend looking at a lighter OS other than Ubuntu. For the repeating test problem, you can initialize a script to look withing a folder on a flash drive and just update the files ...


1

You are going to need at least one multiplexer IC to use this. The only one I see on sparkfun is this but I don't think it is appropriate (a comment mentions internal resistors which will make it useless directly connected to LEDs) unless you also use some transistors (e.g., a darlington array). So that would be Pi -> multiplexer(s) -> darlington array(s) -...


1

To check the state of each gpio on the extension header you could use read_bank_1 from Python or gpioRead_Bits_0_31 from C. To check the state of all the gpios you are interested in you could use a mask. Mask off all but the gpios you want and then compare against the states in which you are interested. e.g. suppose the gpio state is read by one of the ...


1

This my answer using regex. print "Opening communications serial...\n" ser = serial.Serial('/dev/ttyUSB1',115200,timeout=1) ser.open() #check continous loop print "Starting main loop\n" while True: message = CheckUnreadMsgs(ser) a = message.find('\n') + 63 b = len(message) msg = message[a:b] m = re.search("(pow.*)",msg) if m: mm = (m....


1

Unfortunately there are no software drivers for USB OTG and thus it can't be used.


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