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Yes, it is perfectly safe. You lose two protections so take care. The microUSB socket is keyed so you can't mix up +ve and -ve. Take care when connecting. The microUSB socket feeds into a polyfuse which limits current to an amp or so. This mitigates against fire risks in the event of some faults. Perhaps add your own fuse. Alternatively you could wire ...


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If you do not specify the default framerate in python then it will be set to 30fps. The players you are using expect a frame rate of 25fps. So your 30 second video should last 30seconds x 30fps/25fps = 36 seconds. See documentation, 10. API - picamera.camera Module, for the default frame rate. Try using camera.framerate=25 Camera must not be recording for ...


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According to the comments section of the lensholder at Thingiverse one has to remove the PiCamera's lens. Note that removing the lens makes the camera susceptible to dust and damage. Be extra careful with the open sensor. tracyaf_2 Aug 31, 2017 This works excellent. FYI you will have to take out the existing Pi Camera Lens and vaqueram - in ...


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I reconnected all cables, removed screws and it didn't work at the end. I switched to another camera and it works fine. FYI: If you came here searching this, probably your camera is dead.


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Yes you can control shutter speed and many other things. For example raspistill -ISO 800 -ss 6000000 -o out.jpeg Will set the ISO 800 and the shutter speed to the maximum 6,000,000 microseconds, or 6 seconds. Here’s the Raspberry Pi documentation.


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For anyone having the same issues: It turns out that the above code uses too little CPU load and therefore does not shoot up the frequency. When I checked, my CPU was constantly running at 700 Hz. To achieve the required FPS on the above resolution, I changed my cpufreq governor from ondemand to performance. This might not be the only or the best solution, ...


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You can control the shutter speed in python with the package picamera. Installation for python 3: sudo apt-get install python3-picamera Documentation for the shutter speed method: https://picamera.readthedocs.io/en/latest/api_camera.html#picamera.PiCamera.shutter_speed: shutter_speed Retrieves or sets the shutter speed of the camera in microseconds....


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I found one not very good solution, which is suitable to my problem for now. I managed to output the whole video signal (not only the camera video) via 3.5mm TV output. Then I ran a script to make the camera video full screen, and got the camera video on the receiver screen.


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The motion application, available in the Raspbian repos (sudo apt update && sudo apt install motion) can do what you're asking without the need for jumper cables or motion detector, though maybe you want the motion detector. The motion application can be configured to watch for motion using the camera, and when motion is detected, it can ...


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one answer no one would like to hear when asking a question is probably "it depends", but in your case: it really depends. As you have a concrete use case, you could start with a simple project: By setting up motion (https://motion-project.github.io/motion_config.html) and playing around with the configuration options for a motion, e.g., how long should a ...


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OK, I fixed it. I hope this helps someone... I had used ~/path/to/file.py as the directory to which I wanted to store the footage taken by my Python code. I replaced this with absolute reference: /home/pi/path/to/file.py and that solved it.


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Thanks everyone for suggestions. Finally I selected IVport multiplexer: http://www.ivmech.com/magaza/en/development-modules-c-4/ivport-raspberry-pi-camera-module-multiplexer-p-90 It allows up to 4 cameras per adapter, and by stacking 4 of them, up to 16 cameras per board. It is not very cheap though, but as far as I am concerned, reduces the amount of ...


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You can turn on the camera led through the pi’s GPIO using the python code below: #!/usr/bin/env python import time import RPi.GPIO as GPIO # Use GPIO numbering GPIO.setmode(GPIO.BCM)   # Set GPIO for camera LED # Use 5 for Model A/B and 32 for Model B+ CAMLED = 5    # Set GPIO to output GPIO.setup(CAMLED, GPIO.OUT, initial=False)  GPIO....


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I am using a similar setup with a 12V power rail (from mains with a 12V power supply - not a battery) with a 5V/3A buck converter to power a Pi 1B for more than 3 years now without any issue. Also used this setup with a Pi Zero, Pi 2B and most recently Pi 3B+. The only suggestion I have is to not power the Pi over the microUSB port but directly over the 5V ...


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Finally, I've managed to do it, basically, I have used the underlying MMAL object to get the input directly. Now I have maximum framerate while rendering of 45ms, which is almost real-time for my needs. I think it's possible to go lower by changing the format. from picamera import mmal, mmalobj as mo from time import sleep def image_callback(port, buf): ...


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The answer was in the question ^^ The vcdbg program has a dump command, and shoud be called like this : vcdbg dump addr len Thank you everyone :)


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