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I had a very similar problem. Seems that some microSD cards aren't genuine. They may appear to work fine but often fail UNLESS cloned from a previously working card and within the spec ie 7.92GB for a fake 64, H2testW will ferret these out! I found that genuine cards use more power as size increases but not speed. A UHS-1 card will work the same as an x2 but ...


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No, a USB-C connector is limited to 3 Amperes or 15W at 5 Volts. Up to 5 Amperes is possible only with special high power cables and sockets. Wattage above 15W is always achieved by using voltages higher than 5 V, and Raspberry Pi is a 5V only device with a regular 3A socket.


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The Pi4 will run quite happily on a 1A supply, depending on what is connected. See Raspberry Pi Power Limitations There is NO SUCH THING as a "standard 5V / 2A smart phone adapter" - all fast chargers work by using a higher voltage with each manufacturer using proprietary interface. Most will supply 5V @ 500mA (the USB-C spec is 900mA @5V up to 20 V at 5 A)...


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As Dougie has commented the ports are joined together. It is extremely inadvisable to connect the outputs of 2 switch mode power supplies together. The results are unpredictable. It is unlikely to damage the Pi and in the best case power will only be drawn from a single supply - the higher voltage causing the other to ramp down. Normal USB gadgets are ...


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I would read this as: SmartUPS V1.00, Vin NG, BATCAP 61, Vout 5141 Vin NG - Voltage In No good BATCAP 61 - Battery capacity 61% Vout 5141 - Voltage out 5.141v I would check the Vin by: Plug a USB power supply in with no main power Add power to the USB power supply See what status each mode gives you - it may be able to tell you the state of the incoming ...


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