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19

No, you should not increase the voltage any further... and at least this answer linked in the question does not suggest to do that. From Raspberry Pi Power Limitations: Power sources SHOULD provide 5±0.25V ... and: The newer Pi(3/2/B+) have a voltage monitor chip (APX803) which triggers at 4.63±0.07V. The Pi3B+ uses a MxL7704 chip to manage power, ...


12

The MAXIMUM is 5.25V, although this should NOT be the target. You should not apply more than 5.1V That is not to say the Pi will be damaged by the higher voltage, because nothing uses 5V - the on-board regulator supplies the voltages used by the Pi. There is a point when the transient protection diode will trigger - causing the poly fuse to blow. No one ...


6

Nobody can answer that question as it will be down to the peculiarities of the components in each Pi. As you know 5V +/- 5% (4.75 to 5.25 V) is the USB spec. In your case I suspect your power supply claims more than it delivers. Try a better cable or known truthful supply. That said I have powered higher at 5.8V without causing any known damage. However ...


5

I will be customizing another power supply manually using voltage dividers You can't do that. And this suggests that you're a novice with electronics. Voltage dividers are fine for signal conditioning or creating a relative reference point for something, e.g. an A/D converter. They are not a way of regulating a power supply. Any modern computer varies its ...


4

TL;DR The external hard drive is powering the RPI after you remove the microUSB power supply. This is called Backfeeding. This is not unusual for raspberry pi's. Is it bad for the pi I would advise against backfeeding because there is little protection for the Pi. You would need to ensure there is a stable voltage and current to avoid damage. I would ...


4

Cutting power is a brute force method and has risks. The conventional solution to lock-up problems is to use a watchdog. There is a BCM hardware watchdog; If you want to start the hardware watchdog include dtparam=watchdog=on in /boot/config.txt In and of itself this does little, although it should restart the system if not "kicked" regularly. You can ...


2

Question Remote Rpi's freeze from time to time. How to wake them up? Answer 2019jun18 Updates After more thoughts, I concluded that my answer is coming to an end. My conclusion it that @berto's watchdog tutorial and experiment suggestion is good, and his answer is the real answer for the OP's question. I did his suggested experiment ...


2

When I travel I Power Pi’s using a usb power bank. Although this works with an LCD screen, will probably drain the battery quite quickly. As you can see from the pic though, it does work. However, be aware you can't take huge USB battery banks on the plane with security restrictions being what they are. I had a 26,0000 MaH taken off me at the airport in ...


2

yes you can, but the pi will be unstable(it may reboot on it's own), I have been powering the pi from my 0.5A USB port in my laptop, and it was smooth and reliable. P.S. my pi is 3B


2

Before you go looking into additional hardware, please read up on what's called a "watchdog timer". The Raspberry Pi has a hardware watchdog built in that will power cycle it if the chip is not refreshed within a certain interval. I have setup the watchdog on a Raspberry Pi 3 and a new'ish version of Raspbian with very little configuration. The first ...


1

I have quite a few Pis. All of them, except one ran flawlessly. The problem child would crash periodically and would never recover after a power outage without being power cycled again. I had it reboot itself every night via cron and that helped somewhat. What fixed it though was taking the SD card and sensor hardware and putting them into another Pi. It ...


1

If the drive is supplying 5V power to the USB port, it will power the Pi. As this is unusual, and not complying with the USB spec, no one can say if it is safe. NOTE You can not power a Pi through its USB ports, although once booted it will continue to run.


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