3

If lithium power banks lack charge, it would help to know how long you need to operate for. Given the current you need (ideally measured with an ammeter, although you could take published currents for each of the parts of your system) and duration, multiply the time by the current to get a rough estimate of how much energy you need (in Ah). For example if ...


2

I would refute the car damaging phone batteries as I used to look after over 100 mobiles and the most damage was from drops. In 6 or so years we may have had one or two dead units from battery failure. The general chargers you buy (normally cheap) are very poor and can drop voltage down by 1-2volts under low load. As for running the Pi I would look to ...


2

Yes - it will work. UNLESS: The only thing you should be aware of is the possibility that your Huawei charger uses an e-Marked cable. The e-Marked cable will be a problem IFF you have one of the "first-run" RPi 4s, this because the Raspberry Pi Organization built thousands of units with a design flaw. The design flaw has now been recognized & ...


1

A minimum supply of %V 2.5A will work. So you can use that charger/adapter. But use your equipment carefully. If anything pulls current more than it needs the system will fry.


1

If you already get under-voltages without any diodes, it means your USB socket, wires and connectors that go on the GND/5V pins have a high resistance which results in a significant voltage drop. If you have a voltmeter, you could actually measure how much voltage arrives on your USB socket, and how much of that makes it to the Pi board. Otherwise, get wires ...


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