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I just tried hotplugging the Adafruit 128x64 OLED Bonnet into a Raspberry Pi 4B, and the Pi locked up hard (had to be power cycled). Edit: I have no idea why this answer is being downvoted. I put this to the test to answer the question (at the risk of destroying my hardware, I later found out in the comments) -- and the answer was clearly no, hotplugging ...


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That is a good question that I've wondered myself. I don't think there is a ready-made software solution that currently exists, unfortunately. A cool idea for a project would be to build a current measuring device into the USB cable so that you can actively view the reading via a LCD or OLED display. It would just be to extract the functionality of the ...


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Q: Is it possible to measure (with software, like PowerTOP) the Pi's current power consumption, on my Raspberry Pi? You can't actually measure power with software; that would be like attempting to measure time with a spoon. PowerTOP doesn't measure power - it only identifies software entities that utilize system resources which the clever people at Intel ...


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The industrial solution to this is to use a blade, such as a Bitscope Blade


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I use a repurposed PSU from a defunct desktop PC, easy to do and with plenty of 'grunt' for your cluster. Loads of guides online on how to do it and best of all very cheap if you dismantle a scrap PC.


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90W / 9 devices is 10W per device. That's about enough for a Pi 4 alone, but those 18 USB sticks will also need some power, perhaps another 20W-30W. And you'll want to have some extra power reserved for peak consumption, losses in the cables and the hub, etc. Additionally, looking at similar hubs on my local Amazon, I see the following line in the ...


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In addition to the risk of putting 5V on a GPIO pin which is quite likely to damage the Pi you are connecting a large inductive load. This will generate a back EMF of several hundred volts which will probably destroy the SOC. It is not difficult to reduce a 5V input to ~2.2V (which is recommended reliably detect an input on GPIO) but you would need ...


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The Pi gpio pins are not 5v tolerant and operate at 3.3v logic levels so this set up would likely damage your pi. Additionally the maximum recommended current draw from the 5 V pin is the USB input current (usually 1 A) minus any current draw from the rest of the board. Model A: 1000 mA – 500 mA -> max current draw: 500 mA Model B: 1000 mA – 700 mA -> ...


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For one, you need a very good hub that can support a Raspi. Most won't deliver enough power. Also, the PD boards will drain a respective amount of power themselves (unfortunatelly, your link does not specify the max power output of these boards). Depending on the power requirements of your sensor boards, I'd rather go the other way round and power everything ...


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According to the post linked below, the display requires some software initialization on the Pi side. When you reconnect the power to the display, there is no way for the Pi to know it is supposed to reinitialize it. https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=120296 Further down in the thread, you can find the terminal commands to turn the display ...


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