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Did you buy the SD card with NOOBS, or build your own? I got burned a few weeks ago trying to build my first RaspberryPi. Turns out the NOOBS / Raspbian SD card must be formatted as FAT32, which means that card cannot be bigger than 64GB. A larger card will look fine on a PC, but show no activity when plugged into the Raspberry Pi (one steady led on most ...


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Some Comments: @mike's answer is correct. I'll add this: The "reliability problem" may be in your design, not the relay. You've given us no specifications on your relay, so we don't know if you've chosen properly. Depending on the current required for the coil relay, a small bipolar npn transistor may work perfectly well. An Answer: Here's a schematic ...


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If anyone's interested in this still, the answer was to solder the power connections directly to the header inside the RPi. This solved it completely and I just stopped using the micro-USB.


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No. Pins 1 and 17 are connected to the 3V3 rail. Pins 2 and 4 are connected to the 5V rail. They are not GPIO.


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It turns out the PoE HAT doesn't use the GPIO header, so a 2×20 pass-through header can be used to expose the pins for other uses. With that, the goal of powering all nodes via a single power source is achievable! A big thank you to all who commented/contributed to my finding a solution!


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You can use a PoE splitter like this and free up all your pins. And here is the instruction to make one yourself.


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I searched and found this link: https://www.amazon.com/mophie-Powerstation-6-2K-000-mAh/dp/B075ZY2GHZ I think it's your charger/power bank. As you can see on the description on the device and the link, the output is 2.1A (2.1 Amper) at 5V (5 Volt DC). On the other hand, "The Foundation's" published figures for power consumption across all models of ...


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As stated in the Raspberry Pi Model B specifications found here, the "minimum*" current for the Raspberry Pi 4 via the USB-C connector and GPIO headers is 3A. (* being a "good quality 2.5A power supply can be used if downstream USB peripherals consume less than 500mA in total.") Also, in the answer to this question, the user states that while 3A is "...


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In general chargers do a poor job of providing a well regulated 5V output - you need a Power Supply No one can say what your unidentified charger does, but if it has a USB2 output it will probably not work. A USB-C power unit MAY work, but even this varies.


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Pins 2 and 4 are both on the 5V power rail. You can consider them to be the same pin. Just as much power will come out of pin 2 as pin 2 and 4 together. It might be worth connecting 5V power to both ends of the LED strip.


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