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I have had both of these work to force pin 17 low after shutdown. Not sure if this will work for your situation or with any other pins. option 1. edit /boot/config.txt add this dtoverlay=gpio-poweroff,gpiopin=17,active_low=1 option 2 run this from command line sudo dtoverlay -v gpio-poweroff gpiopin=17 active_low=1


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The Pi 3 is protected by the SMBJ5.0A over-voltage suppressor, which has a breakdown voltage between 6.4 and 7.1V. So above 7.1V you are guaranteed to trigger the over-voltage protection. If the protection works as designed, you'll see no smoke: the polyfuse will limit the current to a safe value. However, 7.1V is above the rated maximum voltage of 5V ...


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The Pi is rated at 5.0 ± 0.25V. The PMIC (on modern Pi) has a MAXIMUM input of 5.5V - exceed this at your peril. The "protection" circuitry consists of a combination of polyfuse, ideal diode and surge limiting diode, which varies on model (consult schematics for detail). The Pi3A+ has no ideal diode. Schematics for most models are available. See ...


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With a 1kΩ resistor you can't pull the pin LOW. You will get ~1.2V which is HIGH. Just get rid of it or reduce to 100Ω. There is no need for a resistor; it is a protection mechanism to prevent excessive current for an unlikely combination of circumstances. An opto-isolator would never be capable of pulling enough current to cause problems.


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The pijuice library GetStatus() function should give you what you need: https://github.com/PiSupply/PiJuice/blob/master/Software/README.md#pijuice-status GetStatus() Gets basic PiJuice status information about power inputs, battery and events. Returns: {'data':{ 'isFault':is_fault, 'isButton':is_button, 'battery':battery_status, 'powerInput':...


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