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2

With pip and python you have installed the Python version 2 of spacy. This isn't supported any longer, and it's not surprising that you have problems. Use Python version 3: pip3 install spacy


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Well, I have no idea why or how this was the issue, but following the advice of another post, changing host in server.py to '' fixed it.


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Your LED might be turning off when the end of the script is reached, for example the following script will turn the LED on for 5 seconds, then end, and restore the pin back to its original state (LED off): from gpiozero import LED from time import sleep led = LED(5) led.on() sleep(5) In order to keep the LED on indefinitely, the script must be kept alive. ...


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Agustina, my classmate, pointed out the mistake. def reset(self): global started global belowLow global seconds self.t.set(0) started = False seconds = 0 belowLow = 0 self.listen() <-- should not be included Because of self.listen() it was recursing. I hope I am using the correct term. ...


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No. Do not install it in /usr/bin. /usr/bin is for programs installed by the package manager. If you install packages manually, they go in /usr/local/bin (or ~/.local/bin etc.). You can use the --prefix option of the configure script to select the folder to install it to, by default the prefix is /usr/local. As mentioned in (1), don't set it to /usr or you'...


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I resolved this by installing the certificates again: sudo apt remove ca-certificates sudo apt install ca-certificates sudo reboot sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install python3-pip sudo pip3 install paho-mqtt


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Just install python3-paho-mqtt which is in the repository!


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Rather than the rather bizarre steps you followed, most of which are unnecessary and possibly damaging I suggest you restore a clean Ubuntu and utilise the included Python. Then download the official tarball https://pypi.org/project/RPi.GPIO/#files Then follow the instructions included, viz. $ sudo apt-get install python-dev python3-dev To install the ...


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You can use simple timers to have full control about the time and switches. Just create a service that will switch the lights and create two timer, one to switch on and one to switch off the lights. First create the service: rpi ~$ sudo systemctl edit --force --full switch-lights@.service In the empty editor insert these statements, save them and quit the ...


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Use pigpio. #!/usr/bin/python3 import pigpio GPIO_ENCHUFE = 27 pi = pigpio.pi() level = pi.read(GPIO_ENCHUFE) if level == 0: pi.write(GPIO_ENCHUFE, 1) else: pi.write(GPIO_ENCHUFE, 0) pi.stop()


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I like simple. This is how I'd do it: crontab -e In your editor, add the following lines to your crontab: @reboot /bin/sleep 30; /usr/bin/gpio -g mode 17 out 0 18 * * * /usr/bin/gpio -g write 17 1 0 1 * * * /usr/bin/gpio -g write 17 0 Save your crontab, and exit the editor. At 6:00 PM (your RPi time), GPIO 17 (pin 11) will go "HIGH"; i.e. the ...


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