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21

As far as I'm aware, nothing in the Pi uses magnetic storage, so it shouldn't pose a problem. The SD card uses electric charge to store data (as does all flash media), and the ROM is either the same (if it can be reflashed) or it's burnt in at the factory and impervious to most external fields. If you had a really strong magnet, it's possible you could ...


18

Here is a quote from Gert. Do NOT experiment with trying to guess registers in that area. Especially if you start 'playing' with, or accidentally hit a power register you have the small, but distinct possibility of blowing up your PI. http://www.raspberrypi.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=8496&p=101319 So, apparently, yes, there is the possibility of ...


18

Since everything on the board is 5V and below you would need to have a very low skin resistance to even transfer enough energy to cause any interference on the board let alone shock you in any way. You might not want to try to licking it, but touching shouldn't be a problem. You generally don't get a shock even from 9V and 12V batteries (unless licking is ...


16

You can also set the volume with the command-line amixer tool e.g. amixer cset numid=1 -- -2000 Note: amixer and alsamixer are part of the alsa-utils package. You may need to install this first.


15

What I would consider when doing this is the ventilation and heat dissipation. Although I've already specified in another answer that there are no ventilation requirements for the unit, it is encouraged that at least 2mm be left from the surface of the board and the housing. I would assume that this precaution is primarily for the GPU, as that is the ...


12

Connecting the power and ground pins simultaneously, or the correct combination of GPIO and power or ground pins can fry not only the pin but the entire PI (GPIO voltage levels are 3.3 V and are not 5 V tolerant. There is no over-voltage protection on the board) . You may want to check out this article from the elinux wiki regarding protecting the GPIO Pins


11

Yes, every electronics degrades while it ages, if connected on some power source. The "problem" lies in electronic characteristics itself. One of the phenomena is called electromigration, where IC (actually whole PCB) degrades under various "nonideal" (i.e. working) conditions: current, time, temperature (which is also consequently caused by resistance ...


10

You should be able to protect your raspberry pi form alpha and beta radiation with a simple aluminium case, which might not even be necessary. The question about gamma radiation is: To which intensity of gamma radiation do you want to expose your raspberry to? I'm sure at very high intensities it will harm the raspberry. On the other hand at low intensities ...


10

You could overclock the RPi through over_voltage. Overclocking it through arm_freq and gpu_freq is supported, but over_voltage can damage the CPU and will void your warranty. You do this through your config.txt. Here is a related question that gives a bit more information on overclocking and its dangers.


9

You can do this but I see the following problems you will face: - The connectors on RaPi are not water proof and can not be waterproof in an easy way - You can solve the heat problem by gluing a small heatsink to the CPU, and use an epoxy that has good thermal dissipation characteristics But this is going to be a VERY difficult task and you may need a lot ...


9

I expect the pi will use ALSA in which case you probably want the command alsamixer from the command line, or maybe there will be a GUI mixer control app. You should be able to put a command to alsamixer or edit your ALSA config files to lower the default volume at boot time if needed.


9

For me: The pins, headers and external components look fragile and easily bent. It looks easy to accidentally short GPIO pins and other conductors on the Pi by (e.g.) dropping it on a coductive surface, brushing a conductive object against it or dropping a conductive object onto it while it is powered up. a number of the sockets, the HDMI connector in ...


8

There's software in the repository exactly for this purpose: $ apt-cache search apcupsd apcupsd - APC UPS Power Management (daemon) apcupsd-cgi - APC UPS Power Management (web interface) apcupsd-doc - APC UPS Power Management (documentation/examples) The correct solution to this common problem would be getting a good APC UPS, connecting all your network ...


8

I'm pretty sure a strong enough magnetic field would have a serious effect on the Broadcom SoC, especially the data it stores in ROM for booting up the Raspberry Pi from the SD card. The question is; Is the magnetic field produced by your magnet strong enough to cause permanent damage? Probably not, but why would you want to risk it?


6

I reckon the best case is The Punnet; it is a case made from card. You can print it yourself, fold and glue, and you will have a case in minutes. It protects the RPi from dust, which is the main threat. Other cases may protect the RPi from light spills or unwanted electrical interference, but I don't think it is worth it given the cost of the RPi!


6

All USB keyboards are 5V. No matter how big or how small, they always use 5V power as supplied by the USB port. However, different devices draw different amounts of current. A typical USB port provides 500mA of current, and the Raspberry Pi (model B) draws between 300mA and 700mA (depending on processor load). Try to keep the current used by USB devices to ...


6

Only power the Pi from a 5V power supply. Don't make connections to the pins on the expansion header when the Pi is powered. It is easy to short a pin to an adjacent pin which might cause a damaging short-circuit. Don't connect a voltage less than 0V or greater than 3.3V to the Pi's gpios. Be especially careful if connecting a device which is powered ...


5

Since it's not using radiation hardened ICs like they use in space probes, the Pi wouldn't be very resistant. While I'm no expert, I think the biggest risk to the Pi would be that a bit in memory would be unexpectedly flipped by a stray particle, leading to anything from corrupted data to a program crash, or even the Pi freezing completely and requiring a ...


5

I'm going to be bold and just say no! While it's true some big capacitors can retain their charge and shock you, there's none nearly big enough on the Pi for this to happen, and I don't believe there's anything on the Pi that runs much above 5V anyway. Definitely not at a voltage that could shock you!


5

You could do this via the /etc/hosts file, however, this method can be easily over-ridden with the right knowledge and file access. Beyond the /etc/hosts file, there are two methods that I know of, both using Proxys. These answers were originally for Ubuntu, but they should work just the same on Raspbian (or possibly with a bit of modification,) as both ...


4

According to this page there is a "sound mixer application in your applications menu", though I haven't found too many references to this, so I think what I'm about to say will be as good an alternative. There is a very useful aumix tool which provides a visual terminal view (see image), though it won't be what kids are used with standard PCs! There's some ...


4

For those who said it's not possible to receive a shock off the Raspberry Pi - you are wrong. I got quite a nasty jolt from the capacitor next to the micro-USB power input. The device was unplugged at the time. This was a concern as I have a pacemaker fitted, but fortunately the charge is nowhere near enough to cause any problems there. The Pi still ...


4

You can wait for all the LED's to go off. Only the red LED(power LED) stays on. That's when the Pi has shutdown


4

It is reasonably safe if you are sensible. The MOST IMPORTANT thing is NOT to connect anything >3.3V to a pin. Make sure you don't connect the 5V! In general you should avoid making connections with the Pi running (at least until you get more experience). You should try running a LED (through a resistor - say 470Ω). Connecting push buttons is pretty safe (...


4

To further elaborate on the why not for some of the things: don't plug in an electric motor directly: controlling one is fine, but if it is connected directly, the Pi has nowhere near enough power to run it, and can be destroyed if the motor is spun and acts like a generator, sending power into the pi. don't plug stuff in while the pi is running - while ...


4

While the suggested schematics may (or may not) work it is indeed a lot of effort to save the ground wire (just as joan's answers points out). Don't think of GND as a third pin. It's not a GPIO pin, it's the common ground. It also does not "use up", i.e. you can use it multiple times over. Which is part of your linked picture at raspberrypi.org. Both ...


4

I am interpreting the picture of the printed circuit board of the relay module with accompanying notes as follows: the board includes a transistor and a diode - and while it is impossible to tell from the image without looking at the wiring and/or schematics - it is reasonable to believe this is the freewheel diode you're refering to. Conclusion here: no ...


4

The Relay module in your picture is what so called Relay shield specific designed for directly interfacing with micro controller such as Raspberry Pi or Arduino, the board already consists of the protection diode and switching transistor and active/disabled LED indicator. You can connect 5v, GND, and GPIO directly to VCC, GND, and IN at the shield. To ...


3

The Raspberry Pi does not allow you to shut it down completely, unless you unplug the power. The best way to turn it off is by running sudo shutdown -h now and waiting until everything has been unloaded properly and then unplugging the device. If you have no display I would recommend that you run the command and then wait a few minutes until you unplug the ...


3

There is no simple answer for your question. What do you mean by secure? Why it should be safe by default? It is as secure as your operating system and probably your router (I assume that you have integrated some simple FW there) and of course your Appache instance and web service you are developing. There are really many factors that makes your system ...


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