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21

First install some packages: apt-get install samba-common smbclient samba-common-bin smbclient cifs-utils Then, create a local directory and mount the remote share: mkdir /mnt/abc mount -t cifs //server/share /mnt/abc where server is your windows computer name (dns or netbios) and share is your windows shared directory. Depending on the access you ...


8

You are probably not doing anything wrong. It seems to me that the real issue is that the instructions, as written, don't work generically. The point at which you are apparently stuck is the chown command, but all that is intended to accomplish is to make sure that "you" (really the pi user) actually owns the folder to be shared. If you created the /...


6

You are still vulnerable to: Cryptolocker-style viruses running on any other computers in your network (including on any guest machines you might let on to your home network) Malicious or careless users on your own network Access by someone who gains access to your wireless network (WPS attack or weak/leaked wireless key) Vulnerabilities in the router ...


5

if the samba share does not need any credentials to login and you want to mount the share when you start your raspberry pi then edit the fstab file as root sudo nano /etc/fstab and add the following line //server/share /mnt/abc cifs guest 0 0 close and save the changes to the fstab file check that everything connects as it should with sudo mount -...


5

Well, this is quite a hard question to answer in a way that will be acceptable to security buffs, but I'll go ahead and try anyway: As long as you don't have any port forwards and your router remains secure, I'd say you are pretty safe, however it seems that anyone connected to your net will be able to access and change the content of your share. Note that ...


5

I hope this helps: The Short Answer: Add the following line in the Global section of /etc/samba/smb.conf: disable netbios = yes Prevent nmbd from starting at boot time with the following command: pi@raspberrypi3b:~ $ sudo update-rc.d nmbd disable You can verify that this disables nmbd with netstat -ln | grep 137 and netstat -ln | grep 138. Ports ...


4

sshfs - there are clients for Linux, Windows, Mac and Android you need only ssh server running on RPi. With Windows client, you can map RPI as a network drive. Using FileZilla or WinSCP is another option. or OwnCloud


4

I managed to resolve my issue by not using the configuration file I used in my original post. I used the original (you can restore yours to default by copying a copy of the original from /usr/share/samba/smb.conf) and made two modifications, detailed below: ####### Authentication ####### # "security = user" is always a good idea. This will require a Unix ...


4

This answer is correct as written previously: Install samba-common-bin with apt-get install samba-common-bin In the case of Raspbian, peterretief was incorrect. I have just verified it. I had installed samba-common and was unable to use net. after installing samba-common-bin, it works. peterretief also said that there were other ways to accomplish the ...


4

Here's how I did it yesterday on Raspbian: Create a directory /etc/samba/credentials Create a file /etc/samba/credentials/myserver In the myserver file, put the credentials for that server: username=myusername password=mypassword Note: spaces are important here – don’t use " = ", use "=". # chown -R root.root /etc/samba/credentials # chmod 700 /etc/samba/...


4

Generally speaking Samba over the Internet is a bad idea. See here: https://superuser.com/questions/544393/samba-access-shares-from-internet If you tunneled the traffic through SSH, that would be much more secure. This is somewhat problematic though, as Windows does not allow you to specify a port when accessing a Samba share. There are workarounds as ...


4

You have an average of 300 KB/s using Samba, this translates to an average of 2,45 Mb/s which is in the same range of speed as what you measured with iperf. So even though, you could have USB bandwidth competition between you WiFi dongle and the USB disk, this does not seem to be the case. Your WiFi dongle is reporting good signal quality (e.g. low ...


4

My issue was similar. My target was dd-wrt samba share. My problem: unable to mount it in anyway (also fstab from RPi3). I had errors from "not being able to pass the password to reference to mount.cifs" to "invalid argument error 22". I came across this post, Cannot mount samba share: Mount error (22), and this answer suggests that the solution is to add ...


4

Solution #1 would be to buy a big SD card. Decent flash memory withstands at least 300-500 cycles before it starts dying, so with a 64GB card you can write a total of 20TB to your /var. That's 50 years if you write 1GB per day. Solution #2 would be to move /var to a RAM disk. This will reduce wear, but you're limited in the amount of data you can store in ...


4

It seems you have an answer that addresses your question. I'm posting this as potentially "another answer" to augment @Ephemeral's answer, and because it's something that may be overlooked occasionally: If you are using Raspberry Pi and samba as a file server, perhaps the easiest and most reliable file system to use is the RPi's native ext4 filesystem. In ...


3

There are a couple of things here. In the first place, hdparm measures the raw performance of your hard drive. Going through a USB 2 connection, this is about what you would expect. But you mention the hard drive has been formatted using NTFS. Access to this filesystem can sometimes go really slow on Ubuntu/Debian. There is a good answer here https://...


3

After a lot of test i edited the FS_MOUNTOPTIONS line: FS_MOUNTOPTIONS="-fstype=vfat,umask=0000" Where vfat is the filesystem umask=0000 is the permission of the file and folder. 0000 means rwx-rwx-rwx


3

Install samba-common-bin with apt-get install samba-common-bin.


3

mount.cifs This is more of a Linux question (I love those!) You can mount Windows CIFS shares in a folder on your Pi using the mount command. You can mount the shares at boot time by modifying /etc/fstab.


3

SMB transfer speeds can be quite disappointing, especially when handling lots of small files. Then again, an RPi might not be the best choice as a NAS/file server in the first place. Still, just 1 MB/s is quite slow, even when using SMB as transfer protocol. RPi 3 Model B uses its USB 2.0 hub to handle ethernet, and thus your network shares its bandwidth ...


3

Create a mountpoint for your share: sudo mkdir /media/winshare sudo chown pi:pi /media/winshare Create a smbcred file: nano /home/pi/.smbcred Write the following into it (replace username and password) : username=username password=paswword Save (CTRL-O) and exit (CTRL-X). The dot at the beginning of the filename indicates a hidden file. Hidden files ...


3

There is something messed with your package manager. You may try to "reset" it. Just follow this answer to Raspberry Pi sudo apt-get update not working. Then remove partially installed samba with: rpi ~$ sudo apt --autoclean purge samba and reboot. Then try to install samba again with: rpi ~$ sudo apt install samba


2

I think by far the easiest way to share files is to set up an FTP server. Unless you want to share files through your Wordpress site. You will have to elaborate further what it is that you want exactly. To set up an FTP, here you'll find a guide: http://www.instructables.com/id/Raspberry-Pi-Web-Server/step9/Install-an-FTP-server/ On the other hand you ...


2

The permissions displayed are not on the disk itself, as exFAT does not support ownership etc, but are inherited from the directory in which it is mounted. The permissions displayed indicate that only the owner of the files (root) has write permission. You could fix this by creating a Samba group, and giving this write permission. Rather than using Samba (...


2

Is the USB hdd actually mounted? Type mount and see what it says. If it's not mounted, you will see an empty "disk", because you're looking at the mount point which is an empty directory. Another clue will be that the file you created is still visible even when the hdd is unplugged.


2

I believe you need to specify the option -o username=your_username on windows I believe it will prompt you for a password or you can specify it with the password=your_password smclient is looking at the share which anyone can do but accessing the files on the share is limited to people who have an account.


2

Ok so I got home and tried this for myself. results: Subdirs work and are recognised smb mount works and is recognised games start from mount Slight lags and choppyness from time to time this was tested with CTR crash team racing rom (PSX) EDIT: Similar results with NFS both have about the same transfer speed of max 5MB/s "download" to the retropie ...


2

This is not a pi-specific question. The easiest way is to use nbtscan: nbtscan -v -h 192.0.2.0/24 Or just search for "samba find all netgroups" on Google!


2

Having wrestled with this and windows 10 I feel the OP's pain. Most problems stem from the fact that windows 10 forces SMB3 by default. Working with that configuration the following will work: sudo mount -t cifs -o sec=ntlmv2,username=YOUR_UN,password=YOUR_PW //192.168.0.255/path/to/remote/folder /path/to/pi/folder (obviously replace the ip address with ...


2

From Kodi's docs on the web interface: Method 1 / guisettings.xml Edit the guisettings.xml file in the userdata folder and look for the following settings under <services>, and make sure they are set to "true". You'll have to look for them a little bit, because there among several other settings. Assuming you have not set a password or ...


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