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It seems the cloned SD Card boots up and is running but has problems at least with the network interfaces. On a cloned program it also has exactly the same system parameter like hostname, MAC address, ssh server keys, UUID and PARTUID of the storage and maybe other parameter I just don't remember now. This is no problem if the clones are running on different ...


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If you want to recover a broken SD Card the operating system must have access to the device. You must have at least a device file, something like /dev/sdb. Because it is broken it's possible that you don't see partitions (/dev/sdb1) but you need the raw device file to access the SD Card. But as shown with lsblk the operating system cannot find the device so ...


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It does sound like the SD card reader has gone pop. I would: Format a spare card (less than 32Gb) using another Mac / PC as Fat (one partition) Create a small text file on this card using any editor - call it test.txt to check it accepts files OK Put this card in the on-board SD Card slot Install Raspberry Pi OS Lite on another card Put this card into the ...


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The issue is not normally the destruction of the card (I've used normal ones in -16C) but the actually data or OS file system being corrupted by not being written to the card as the machine dies due to the environment. I used to handle over 70 different bits of kit in the field that where mission critical and had to handle temperatures of +40C down to -35C (...


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USB 2.0 has a maximum bandwidth of 480Mb/s, or 60MB/s although speeds closer to 30MB/s are common. The raspberry pi foundation says that any SD card will work and give examples of cards that operate at 4 and 10 MB/s so a USB 2.0 SSD should have sufficient speed.


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You asked how to fix the overclocking problem. I would say the solution is: don't overclock the Raspberry Pi because you are also get a warning that it may kill your WiFi.


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This is more of a "workflow" answer as I'm unsure exactly what environment you're working in. If you have specific questions, you may either edit your original question, or use the Comments (sparingly please). Duplicating your system as an image file: You can use image-utils to create an image file of your "existing unit". One of the ...


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I assume you can only read the fat32 boot partition when configuring the SD-Card in a card reader attached to another non Unix computer (MS Windows, Apple Mac) before booting it in the RasPi. The hostname is defined on the ext4 root partition in the file /etc/hostname containing the name. On the running Raspberry Pi you can just create this file in the boot ...


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The third option (USB boot without SD-Card) for a Raspberry Pi 4B is stable since 2020-06-15. You can try to use it. Look at Why does Raspberry Pi 4 do not support USB boot?.


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