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Quoting from the Adafruit product page Note: The Raspberry Pi Sense HAT is compatible with the Raspberry Pi 3, Raspberry Pi 2, Model B+, and Model A+, but NOT the earlier 26-pin models of Raspberry Pi 1 Model B & A's. Pi not included! This forum post mentions getting the sense hat to work with the Pi Zero and older versions of the Raspbian ...


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There is nothing in HAT requirements about supplying a machine-readable list of sensors. Therefore, there is no generic methods to list sensors on a HAT: even if such a method exists, it will be manufacturer-specific at best and HAT-unique at worst. HAT EEPROM contains either a device tree overlay or a name of such overlay in an external file. See if ...


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The problem was the display resoluton. I found the solution in this github issue: $raspi-config 7 Advanced Options A5 Resolution DMT Mode 4 640x480 60Hz 4:3 Since this Pi4 is booted headless, I needed to set the display resolution.


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This in fact is a known problem with the Sense-Hat. See https://github.com/astro-pi/python-sense-hat/issues/96 for detail. Apparently, the Sense-Hat interferes with the resolution auto-detection if there is no monitor attached (works fine with monitor attached). The work around is to manually specify a resolution (you do not have to force HDMI). You can ...


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You can access the GPIO pins from the Sense Hat. However, it requires some minor physical modification to the Sense Hat board. Here are the steps I saw explained in a YouTube video by Keith's Pi Tutorials: Carefully remove the female 2x20 header that comes with the Sense Hat by gently prying it away from the bottom of the board. It is connected only by ...


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I recommend doing this with a small set of iptables rules redirecting all traffic to port 80 and 443 to your home page. iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 80 -j DNAT --to-destination localhost:80 iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 443 -j DNAT --to-destination localhost:80 An example with the ip's that you have provided being: iptables -...


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Desoldering a component with 40 pins is quite arduous without proper equipment and some experience. The trick is to heat all pins at the same time - a hot air gun comes in handy. Of course you wouldn't want the heat the PCB or adjacent components. Another way to remove the old header is (thanks to Steve Robillard) to use some cutting pliers to cut them into ...


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For the shutdown command, try: os.system("sudo shutdown -h now") The problem with the script as it stands now is that your time delay is just halting operation of the script for 240 seconds which is not what you need. Instead you need to mark the time when there's zero activity and store it in a variable and then compare that variable to actual time each ...


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This page in the documentation (section 3.5) states: As of Linux 4.4, the RPi kernels support the dynamic loading of overlays and parameters. Compatible kernels manage a stack of overlays that are applied on top of the base DTB. Changes are immediately reflected in /proc/device-tree and can cause modules to be loaded and platform devices to be created and ...


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Per this Pi Foundation forum thread There will be no registry maintained for ID data. You are free to use whatever data you want in the vendor fields of the "vendor info" EEPROM atom (0x0001), but of course the UUID must be unique and properly formatted. Further details can be found in the design guide and the ID EEPROM data format spec, and the ...


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The 3 has the same form factor as the 2/0/+ models, with the same 40 pin GPIO header, so yes. The buses involved will work the same way, hence so should the software.


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I haven't tested any audio options with the Pi Zero aside from the HDMI out (which worked fine for me, but I wasn't doing anything clever with the GPIO pins at the time). That said, your options with the Zero should be the same as with any other Pi. You should be able to use any compatible USB sound card, or a GPIO I2S DAC (the Sense HAT uses the I2C pins, ...


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The SenseHAT does not have any analog inputs. The ideal solution is to remove the standard GPIO header and fit an extra long, stacking one through the holes. You can then look at wiring up, for example, an MCP3008 chip which will give you 8 analog inputs.


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You have provided no meaningful information which would allow anyone to provide a definitive answer (and no actual evidence of any problem). The most likely scenario is that the Pi has booted, but you have asked it to do the impossible i.e. boot to Desktop when there is no default Desktop (an examination of the boot logs would probably confirm this). See Pi4 ...


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OP said, "power it with a 5V, 2 A supply. I don't use any peripherals with it." OP also said, "the (sense) hat on top of it lit up too" (emphasis mine) Raspberry Pi docs said: Recommended PSU current capacity for Pi 3B+: 2.5A And so you'll have to excuse those of us who wonder if you've a) not done your homework, and b) wandered in with ...


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The questioner found the solution as he commented: Turns out...it was the device. I swapped in a different Sense HAT and everything worked beautifully. --@BenDowney


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The sense HAT has a couple of sensors, all of which are interfaced over I2C. The sensors are LPS25H(pressure/temp sensor), LSM9DS1(IMU), HTS221(Humidity and temperature sensor) and LED2472G(Led Driver). More details on the pinout are here. The sense hat has a python library available here and all the functionality other than for the LED array is implemented ...


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Generally speaking, JavaScript scripts are not given direct access to hardware by the browser. This would be an enormous security vulnerability; imagine going on to a website and it can then access everything connected to your computer. Not good. That said, you can still achieve what you want a slightly different way. Your Pi needs to be a web server; you ...


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I've just bought the same hardware and had the exact same issue. After reading what felt like hours of webpages (not not understanding 99% of it), adding: dtoverlay=rpi-sense to the bottom of /boot/config.txt has resolved the issue.


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As suggested in the comments above, I ran a simple test using two copies of the same data logging program and found that both programs are running fine side by side in the background. While I haven't tried the specific scenario posed in the question, the fact that two programs accessing the same set of sensors is not having problems, I suspect the ...


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I have had a similar problem but not because I wanted access to some of the GPIO pins. You can find the pins used by the Sense Hat here. Although I am not completely sure I think the Sense Hat only needs one GND pin (please correct me if I am wrong someone). Also, try watching this tutorial by Kieth's Pi Tutorials. To clarify (as people have disliked my ...


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To answer the 'How do I avoid this happening again?' question, there is a guide to assembling your Sense HAT which indicates how to fit the standoffs and screws to your Pi and Sense HAT. Note that the GPIO extension header can be removed safely from the Pi and Sense HAT (provided all other cables are disconnected and the power is off of course...).


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If you're skilled enough, you can solder the Pins back onto the PCB. I know they are small, but still quite accessible on the Sense Hat. To avoid this kind of damage, try not to lever with too much force while removing the HAT. Distribute the force equally among the whole PCB (small force left, small force right and so on). Otherwise, there will be a heavy ...


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Your problem seems to be related to something else, but I'll make a stab at answering the question: can it be calibrated? Any sensor can be calibrated with the right equipment and a wee bit of coding. These range from single point calibrations, simply applying an offset to the reported value, to full, multi-point, linearized calibrations. The standard ...


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Make sure your Pi is up to date using the following: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade sudo reboot There's an ongoing post on the RaspberryPi forum with others reporting the same problem you seem to be having: Link When I had problems with my own it was due to two processes trying to read from the sensehat at the same time and mixed up the ...


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There are two mistakes here: using f instead of CPUTemp for the calculation the argument specifiers are used before doing the calculation %f /1000.0 * 1.8 + 32 instead of %(f /1000.0 * 1.8 + 32) that's the part that throws the error. Assuming that show_message() handles format strings like print does - which apparently is not true. So while this is working ...


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The following snippet will print the temperature. #!/usr/bin/env python f = open("/sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0/temp") t = f.read() f.close() print(int(t)/1000.0)


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The high temperature sensor readings is a known issue related to being close to the PI's CPU. There is a good article on GitHub that explains this and provides a way to calibrate the temperature sensors using the CPU's temperature readings.


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Firstly, I have no idea why the humidity sensor is not working. However, I do know why the temperature sensor is not working. The temperature sensor is not working as ,when attached to the Pi, the temperature sensor is directly over the CPU (Central Processing Unit) of the Pi. To get round this you can get the temperature from the pressure or humidity but as ...


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