14

The password isn't actually stored anywhere on the system, a one way hash of it is. This means even if you have the hash, you won't be able to deduce the password. The hash itself is stored in /etc/shadow. Take the SD card out and stick it in another linux system; any common distro (ubuntu, fedora, arch, etc.) should do. On that system, create a new ...


9

In the files extracted from the RPI Installer, I had to edit cmdline.txt and change this line: console=ttyAMA0,115200 kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200 console=tty1 to: console=ttyAMA0,115200 kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200 console=ttyAMA0,115200 After making that change, I could boot up my Pi and the console was showing in the putty session, allowing me to install Raspian. ...


9

If we accept the Adafruit technical specs, and you bought the dongle from Adafruit. Leave the red (5V) lead unconnected. Connect the black (ground) lead to P1-6 (Pi ground). Connect the green (TX) lead to P1-10 (Pi RXD) Connect the white (RX) lead to P1-8 (Pi TXD) http://elinux.org/RPi_Low-level_peripherals for Pi pin numbering. Even if TX/RX are ...


6

You only need to connect GND, RXD, TXD GND => PIN 6 RXD => PIN 8 TXD => PIN 10


6

The short answer is - you cant. Or really, there is no point. A connection between two computers using a cable is called a "direct cable connection". Or in your case "USB direct cable connection". The problem is that USB also supplies power, and you can't connect two USB hosts together. If you do that, you need some spacial cable which is in fact two USB ...


6

The default bash prompt is set in a system wide file; for a complete explanation of how bash sources its configuration see INVOCATION near the top of man bash. In short, that system wide file is sourced by ~/.bashrc; it is pretty obvious. # Source global definitions if [ -f /etc/bashrc ]; then . /etc/bashrc fi Evidentally, what's deciding about ...


5

This is probably the well known bug of the spurious character when the serial port is opened. I don't remember the details, something to do with the TX line dropping for an instant so signalling a spurious start bit. From memory it is a bug in the Raspberry Pi Linux driver. I don't know why it hasn't been fixed, it has been commented on for several years. ...


5

I read Walter's answer here and researched more and found: https://kb.iu.edu/d/acpy which indicated: TERM=ansi; export TERM does the job, you can add it to your .bashrc However, I still have grey for black so I looked a bit more and found this: https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/93814/cant-apply-brightness-to-terminals-background-color Leading to ...


4

How to get the TTL console working on the Raspberry Pi STEP 1Edit /boot/cmdline.txt and make sure you have the following: dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=ttyAMA0,115200 kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200 console=tty1 elevator=deadline root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 rootwait The important part here is to have console=ttyAMA0,115200 and kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200 STEP ...


4

Acording to this question, to use UART on the Pi-3 you will need to disable bluetooth.


4

Let me try to un-confuse you :) In the good old days, computers came with serial ports. The standard is known as RS232. These slowly disappeared, first from laptops and then from desktops. These days, you can use either internal cards, or USB-to-serial adaptors (but read on). The serial connection on the Pi (also on Arduinos and other such things) is not ...


4

Setup for OTG Serial Gadget Enabling the USB OTG Serial Gadget Plug your miniSD card into your card reader and navigate to the card's /boot partition. This is the smaller of the two partitions. Edit the cmdline.txt file and add this directly after rootwait modules-load=dwc2,g_serial Edit the config.txt file and add this directly after the last line in ...


4

First a complete picture with "official" colored wires. Thanks to fiery for providing this picture to connect an USB to TTL serial adapter. As shown in the pinout you have mixed up TXD (pin 8) and RXD (pin 10). Maybe it is the reason why your adapter get hot? Then to /boot/config.txt I have only added enable_uart=1 No need to disable bluetooth. My /boot/...


3

Assuming you want to see what is arriving at the Pi's serial port. The Pi's primary UART is connected to pins 8 (TXD, gpio 14) and 10 (RXD, gpio 15). The grounds of the two machines needs to be connected as well as TX<--->RX and RX<--->TX. All the Pi's gpios are 3V3. If you feed a 3V3 TTL (i.e. 0V or 3V3) to gpio 15 you can see what is being ...


3

if you want to be able to find where is +5V, GND, TX and RX pins, you need a multimeter (a voltmeter basically), 1kOhm resistor and a simple LED. first you need to find the GND and +5V, most probably these are BLACK and RED, however might be any colour. connect multimeter to the GND and touch other pins starting from RED, once you see 5V on your multimeter, ...


3

The PiTFT will only use two GPIO Ports (#24 and #25), if you don't use the buttons (source). Of course, the board will stack up to all of them, but you can buy a stacking header which will stick through the holes far enough for you to connect other hardware. To make sure you don't use ##24 and 25 twice, you might want to cut them off after soldering. And, ...


3

I've used a Python to send out Serial via the USB port. So yes its possible. You need to install the drivers. I think the most common is FTDI. More info here on creating an alias and calling from python - Get USB address. Installing the FTDI driver was buried in this doc... took me a while to dig it up.


3

This answer describes how to transfer plain text between PC and RpiB, using a serial cable. At the PC side, an usb to serial adapter can be used to converts PC's USB signals to 5V UART serial signals . At the Rpi3 side, there are 2 GPIO pins: UART0 Txd, Rxd for data transfer at 3.3V level. These Rpi UART signals at 3.3V should be shifted up to 5V, ...


3

You can solve this by setting the bootdelay of u-boot to -2 using the u-boot console: setenv bootdelay=-2 saveenv Another solution is adding these lines of code to include/configs/rpi.h: #define CONFIG_AUTOBOOT_KEYED #define CONFIG_AUTOBOOT_PROMPT "\nRPi booting... Stop with ENTER\n" #define CONFIG_AUTOBOOT_DELAY_STR "\r" See also here.


3

You could always just plug the pi into the USB-C port and SSH in that way. The USB-C can be used to turn the Pi4 into an ethernet device, I've written up instructions on how to set it up here: https://www.hardill.me.uk/wordpress/2019/11/02/pi4-usb-c-gadget/


3

Have a look at the curses library. From your description it will probably do what you want. Google for "curses library c tutorial".


2

You could run PPP over the serial line. To do that you would first need a PPP server on the other computer and make sure the Raspberry Pi is not using the serial port for the console. Search for Linux PPP tutorials and you probably find what you need to get it working.


2

Seems like whatever distribution you're running on Raspberry doesn't have getty or some equivalent attached to the serial port (and the tutorial doesn't as much as mention that necessity). Check /etc/inittab for a line looking similar to: T0:23:respawn:/sbin/getty -L ttyAMA0 115200 vt100 Make sure there's no # in front of it. If there is, remove it. If ...


2

@11684's problem was solved by my comment, as you can see here. Just posting this as answer so he can mark it as answer and get this officially answered.


2

I found the problem as soon as I started writing my question. The solution is simple -- there was a mistake in my cmdline.txt file. The original content was: dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 rpitestmode=1 console=ttyAMA0,115200 kgdboc=ttyAMA0,115200 console=tty1 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 rootwait I added second console=tty1. Thus, all output from init script ...


2

In addition to John La Rooy's answer, I've also connected VCC (i.e., +5V) to PIN 2. Thus, my Pi receives enough power from my computer to boot from a USB key.


2

No. The Raspberry Pi Tx/Rx GPIO pins are 3.3 volt logic. Standard RS-232 serial can be as high as 12-15 Volts. Connecting a standard RS-232 directly to the GPIO will probably damage the Raspberry Pi.


2

I'm assuming you want to plug the non-USB end into the Pi's UART (gpios 14/15, pins 8/10 on the Pi's expansion header). All the Pi's gpios are 3V3. As long as you are using a 3V3 variant of the cable with USB on one end and wires on the other it should be fine. You need to connect RX, TX, and ground for the serial link to work.


2

To answer your question. ser=serial.Serial("/dev/ttyAMA0", 9600, timeout=3) will open the port at 9600 bits per second. If you have any other questions it would be useful if you provide diagnostic information. At the very least details of what you send and what you actually receive and details of how you have wired the connection.


2

The answer is it depends (on what is at the other end). The Pi only outputs 3.3v signals, but assuming the converter is powered from USB it should work provided the system at the other end has the appropriate driver. Provided the interface is 3.3v give it a try, it won't hurt.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible