16

Hardware Solution If you want to guarantee that the time on the RPi is always correct or want to maintain the time without a network connection, you will need to buy an expansion board with a Real Time Clock (RTC) on it: there is at least one available and at least one in development. Available RTC Expansion Boards RTC Module for the Raspberry Pi by CJE ...


13

In the /boot/config.txt file, add hdmi_group=2 and hdmi_mode=58 to get 1680x1050. You must be root to do this. Restart the Raspberry Pi; sudo reboot. Notes See http://elinux.org/RPi_config.txt for a complete list of resolutions and modes.


9

Bricking a device usually refers to getting the ROM into a corrupted state, by flashing with a bad ROM or a failed flash. As Pi has no ROM, you can't brick it like that. Pi runs off the SD card only, so a clean reflash of the SD card should fix it. If a particuar card is not working (and has never worked) there is a list of known problem cards on a wiki: ...


6

You could do this if you have a Linux computer, but it is far from straightforward. I suggest you backup your data and do a fresh install of Raspbian. If you have data you want to preserve you could follow the suggestions in:- https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/a/5492/8697


4

Call up the Terminal, type sudo raspi-config select boot-behaviour and choose Command Line. When the Pi starts up, it will show a load of diagnostic reports and then a prompt for a username and password. To then get to the desktop, type startx


3

The Pi does not have factory settings in that sense. Everything is held on the SD card. You will have to burn a new image to a SD card.


3

Unfortunately, there isn't a central location where all settings are stored, so this task is a lot harder than it sounds. Fonts Your fonts should be managed by fontconfig. The possible configuration locations are noted in the article: /etc/fonts/fonts.conf /etc/fonts/conf.d $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/fontconfig/conf.d $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/fontconfig/fonts....


3

I know this article is a bit stale, but I hope this helps someone: Just had to do this same thing in order to save space on backups. It actually wasn't difficult at all, provided you have some time and an extra SD card. I started by creating a script that backed up everything I was interested in. Credit goes to this article for getting me started. I ...


3

The easiest way would be to back up your data, reformat the card and then install the Debian OS to the SD Card, I realize that it seems you want to remove NOOBS without having to reinstall Debian. Doing this would be both difficult and frustrating to do, and I don't see any need for it unless you have some valuable data on the Pi that somehow can't be backed ...


3

Install the NTP daemon on Arch Linux with systemd: sudo pacman -S ntp sudo systemctl enable ntpd sudo systemctl start ntpd Also make sure your timezone is set correctly, in my case: sudo rm /etc/localtime sudo ln -s /usr/share/zoneinfo/Asia/Tokyo /etc/localtime


3

For non-networked applications (or where network time might not be good enough), you can set your RTC clock (@Alex Chamberlain's answer) with time derived from a GPS receiver or a VLF receiver (in NW Europe this would be Rugby MSF). Both could be excellent solutions to field-deployed devices (robots, field monitoring, etc). Both solutions would also make ...


3

All plugins, settings, etc. are stored in ~/.xbmc. So you just need to sync that folder, for example using the rsync command: https://www.google.com/search?q=rsync+synchronize+remote+folder


2

It looks as though that adapter has a 8188SU chipset. According to the Debian Wiki you should be able to install the drivers via ssh by (you will probably need to sudo these commands) : Add a "non-free" component to /etc/apt/sources.list, for example: # Debian 7.0 "Wheezy" deb http://http.debian.net/debian/ wheezy main contrib non-free Update the list of ...


2

A common problem for this is that the .xsession file is missing from the new user's home directory. Try copying that file from the pi user's home directory to that of the new user. Edit: As prograde mentioned in the comments, it appears some versions have moved the file to .config/.lxsession


2

You have to set file_open_mode value in /etc/vsftpd.conf file. Config file may not contain that key=value pair in default. Add as you want. But to enable this function you have to set chmod_enable value as YES From the vsftpd.conf man page: file_open_mode The permissions with which uploaded files are created. Umasks are applied on top of this ...


2

PATH=NODE_JS_HOME=/usr/share/adafruit/webide/repositories/node-v0.10.2-linux-arm-pi Here you went wrong. It will not work with multiple equals signs. Please try NODE_JS_HOME=/usr/share/adafruit/webide/repositories/node-v0.10.2-linux-arm-pi PATH=$PATH:$NODE_JS_HOME EDIT: If the ...


2

Directly connected. I actually just got it. I'm reluctant to say "figured it out." but I logged out, and looked at the other login session options. The greeter was set to EN_US.UTF-8 There were 3 options, "default", "OpenBox", and "LXDE". LXDE was what I was using by default, anyway, so I was curious why the default wasn't LXDE in the greeter menu. So I ...


2

Maybe this can be solved with Persistent configuration A persistent keymap can be set in /etc/vconsole.conf which is read by systemd on start-up. The KEYMAPvariable is used for specifying the keymap. If the variable is empty or not set, the uk keymap is used as default value. For example: /etc/vconsole.conf KEYMAP=uk ... For convenience, localectl may ...


1

It is very unclear what you have done so we cannot really help you to repair your installation. The best is you start from scratch by flashing the image again to your SD Card and then ask what you want to achieve. Please take the Tour and look at the Help Center how to do it the best way.


1

In the console, the command alacarte will start the main menu editor. If even the console is not available, there's the executable file /home/pi/.local/share/applications.desktop, which appears as "Main Menu Editor" e.g. in the PCManFM file browser. A completely failsafe way, even if the menu is completely destroyed, should be to create a new text file ...


1

You might be able to boot to a USB device, and from there format the SD card. https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/raspberrypi/bootmodes/msd.md I'll advice you to find another option to write to the SD card, as that is by far the easiest way to go. You might be able to find a cheap SD card reader on ebay.


1

You can try the following in terminal to get the time automatically from an ntp server. ntpdate ntp.ubuntu.com


1

The "drive" you were looking at is a partition on your SD Card. This is /dev/mmcblk0p5 and contains the NOOBS boot files. This is automatically mounted by the GUI in /media/pi/SETTINGS/ sudo fdisk -l /dev/mmcblk0p5 will show you the properties of the partition. If you (or the system) renamed it this will show the name, but it should not affect the system ...


1

You are doing too much things with a command line. After you recognized you need to process the data, you need to handle errors and so on. It is much better to write your server with pocketsphinx API in C or in Python or Ruby, it will just be 20-30 lines of code.


1

Provided you are using the latest version of Raspbian you should be able to run the same SD Card on different models (at least kernel 4.1.18). I routinely use cloned cards in a B, B+, Pi2 & Pi3 (although the B doesn't get much use lately). There are a few things to look out for. If you want to run them simultaneously you should use different hostname ...


1

Expanding on OceansCrashing answer, this is the rsync syntax I used to successfully copy one live Pi (with noobs) to another one (running native Raspbian): sudo rsync -avx --rsync-path="sudo rsync" --progress --exclude=proc --exclude=sys --exclude=dev/pts --exclude=/etc/fstab --exclude=backups pi@xx.xx.xx.xx:/ / Where xx.xx.xx.xx is the IP address of the ...


1

This it what I've done and what has worked for me, but I'm not entirely sure it applies to everyone so do this at your own risk :) (based partially on this post at raspberry forum) I've tested this steps on a 8Gb Noobs image, with only one OS (Raspbian) installed. I have RECOVERY, BOOT, ROOT (Raspbian), and SETTINGS partitions. Insert sdcard into an linux ...


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