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7

It's a usual linux and Unix problem, nothing Pi-related. Here is the problem: your libs need to be symlinked. Do sudo -s and become a root for such an operation. And let's troubleshoot it! First, find them, like this: # find / -name libEGL* -type f # find / -name libGLESv2* -type f and do this linking to the full paths to files like this: # ln -fs /path/...


5

raspistill or raspivid. How can I install these? They're distributed pre-compiled (armv6, which will work with any distro that runs on any model) via the Raspberry Pi Foundation's github site, in the same repository that includes the kernel and various other bits. git clone https://github.com/raspberrypi/firmware You don't need to install this on the Pi, ...


5

You can use packages.debian.org to check this in a really easy way. I usually just search in Google for the package name and look for the result from the Debian Packages site. Here's libgles2-mesa-dev in the package list. Note that for Stretch, the header is: Package: libgles2-mesa-dev (13.0.6-1 and others) So, in this case, you have the latest version ...


5

Try running sudo apt-get upgrade and then sudo apt-get update before running sudo apt-get install libusb-1.0-0-dev. Also Make sure you are connected to the internet, run ping 8.8.8.8 and ping google.com I had a problem a while ago where I could ping IPs but not addresses.


4

I was able to successfully build and test tbb following the thread below: https://software.intel.com/en-us/forums/topic/500680 I built version tbb43_20150209oss and used the following flags to make: CXXFLAGS="-DTBB_USE_GCC_BUILTINS=1 -D__TBB_64BIT_ATOMICS=0" While libtbb is not necessary for RPB1 owners, the Raspberry Pi B 2 has a quadcore processor and ...


4

Shared or dynamic libraries are needed at run time. So you need the library not only on the build system but in on the target system, in this case on the PI. This is different from static libraries. If you use a static library at build time, all the needed code from the library would be included in the executable, and the library would not be needed to run ...


3

The sysfs system filesystem access to the GPIO is all that is provided as a standard library from Linux. There are dozens of third party libraries. See http://elinux.org/RPi_GPIO_Code_Samples for some of the third party libraries.


3

cv2.so should be someplace within the build directory. You can use find <build folder> -name cv2.so to locate it. In order to get ./First image.jpg to run sucessfully you'll need to ensure that the binary knows where it can find the library file. You can do this two ways: Any binary under linux automatically looks in the current directory for its ...


3

libtbb isn't available on wheezy under armhf but Raspberry Pi version 1 is single core and TBB is unecessary. You can skip over TBB via a cmake option: -DWITH_TBB:BOOL=FALSE Raspberry Pi 2 however has four cores and TBB is beneficial. Here are @danielchalef's steps in a bit more detail - substitute the latest tbb version as required: # Download and ...


2

Unless you have a very good reason it is best to install software from an official repository. You can then be sure that the software has been tested and is consistent with the other packages from that repository. In the case of opencv you can install from the repositories with the following commands. sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libopencv-dev ...


2

I don't know the exact solution to your problem, but I had the same issue with raspistill when the camera had not enough time to "warm up" (when the --timout option is set to 0 or a only a few microseconds). Try to add a second of sleep() before //Start capture. I hope this helps!


2

apt-cache search libkrb5 sudo apt-get install --reinstall libkrb5-3


2

Thanks to Joan for solving the problem. First and foremost, you need a library to run your fingerprint sensor.I found one here: https://github.com/bastianraschke/pyfingerprint Follow the instructions to install the library in your pi. Then connect your fingerprint scanner to the raspberry using the GPIO ports. You can find what ports corresponds to what in ...


2

Not easily I am afraid. If you can afford downtime the easiest thing is to shutdown, backup the disk, reinstall then recover from the backup. If you can afford downtime but don't want to do a complete reinstall you can backup the disk, get a copy of the original image and copy the /lib directory to your image. But the files in there will be out of date/...


1

You probably just need to run sudo apt update That needs to be done to find new versions. After that you can use apt to install the packages you need to get those libraries. For example libcblas.so.3 can be installed with sudo apt install libcblas3 For reference rather than apt-file I just use things like apt search libcblas When I want something ...


1

sudo apt-get install libqtgui4 worked for me. HTH


1

Try: sudo apt update sudo apt install libjpeg8 If you're attempting to run an existing snes9x binary on Stretch, once you have all dependencies it will typically work as long as you haven't enabled the full OpenGL driver. However if building from source, take heed of notes in this thread.


1

Run Wheezy (No, Really) I cannot run Wheezy as it will not run on the Pi 3 due to kernel support for ARMv8 According to this answer, you can run Wheezy on the RPi3. You just need to update Wheezy on a different, older Pi before putting the SDcard into the RPi3. Not sure if it's the best solution though...


1

AFAIK WiringPi should be included in latest Raspbian. If you have the gpio utility it is there (as gpio is a WiringPi utility).


1

The usual way to use the camera from C/C++ is to use libmmal (this is the library used by raspistill and raspivid). The source is part of the userland repository, specifically look under interface/mmal in there and you'll find all the headers. For examples of MMAL use, have a look at the raspistill and raspivid source code, which you can find under ...


1

I recommend that you try a module called opencv you may install it by running the following command: install python-opencv bindings, numpy here is some example code to help you get started: import cv2 cam=cv2.VideoCapture(0) img=cam.read() cv2.namedwindow("camera", cv2.CV_WINDOW_AUTOSIZE) cv2.imshow("camera",img) cv2.waitKey(0) cv2.destroywindow("camera"...


1

Trying changing shutter speed to zero if it is not already zero in private_impl.cpp in raspicam/src/private/. Shutter speed decides the time till which the frames is exposed hence regulates the amount of light received by the frame. Also try increasing the iso. ]1


1

Those error message from the linker ld is tell you it cannot find the required librariesheader files to linkinclude with the software that has been when it is compiled. That usually means installing the development versions of something that you may already have the runtime part of - or installing both - it depends! As for the specifics of your case: /...


1

The only way I was able to fix this, is upgrading to Jessie and rebuilding it from source. This time I didn't use make install but checkinstall to not have those issues in future.


1

I do not know where the error is and still cannot compile it with my script. But using yaourt it works. You can install opencv-contrib. The original PKGBUILD would not let you compile it because the Pi is an armv7h or armv6h architecture. But you can trick it by changing the PKGBUILD. Just add 'armv7h' 'armv6h' to arch as shown below and add the other two ...


1

Based on this link, you should check file permissions and naming conventions.


1

I think that the format should be C/C++. If I'm right, the bcm2835 library can be used in C and C++ code. About wiringpi I'm not sure. And about your question, it's possible to mix the two libraries for different purpose. You can try, you can't broke anything. But, I have a question! If I'm right, both libraries are for controlling the GPIO pins. Why do you ...


1

You need to have shared.h in the same directory as main.c when you compile (or in /usr/local/include or other include directory on the search path).


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