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5

If you installed a new OS it has a new key. Any existing connection history on your computer is meaningless. Delete it! If you create a ~/.ssh/config you can disable StrictHostKeyChecking. I use the following (on my iMac) to disable ONLY for my local network (for which it is unnecessary). You may get warnings, but get the option to connect. Host 10.1.*.* ...


2

As per the instruction "If you want to enable SSH, all you need to do is to put a file called ssh in the /boot/ directory" I'm hoping that's not literally what it says in the Foundation docs, because it is misleading if you are new to the whole deal. But if you aren't, it's understandable why someone would refer to it this way. Filesystem ...


2

Basically what you're asking is, if there's any way you can run code on an ARM processor without actually owning one? There definitely are options, including for instance hosted development servers or emulation. One could google "raspberry pi vps" for instance, and find some results there. If your requirements are more loose (and you can use pretty ...


1

the aforementioned ansible playbook that I started but terminated had activated the firewall and restricted acceptable ports for ssh. Once I disabled it I was able to ssh as before.


1

Amazon Web Services (AWS) now has ARM based EC2 instances (virtual machines) based on their Graviton ARM processors. If you create a new AWS account you can get 1 year of usage of the AWS free tier of services. It's unclear if the t4g.micro instance is included in the 1 year free tier, however, AWS has a promotion until March 31st 2021 allowing you can use ...


1

I think there are two possibilities: Case 1. Assuming your SD card is a relatively new one, I think you've done something wrong, somehow. Does your SD card have a wee switch on it to make the entire card RO? - or, maybe your Mac user doesn't have any privileges, - or, something else... On my Macs (Catalina, Mojave and High Sierra), I have no problem at all ...


1

You say "I understand that simply copying these files to a new computer would not be very secure" - I don't know where you got this idea. You can (and should) copy the public key to ~/.ssh/authorized_keys on any computer you trust. My keys have been installed on my 9 Pi and all the other computers I use on my local network for ssh & ftp access ...


1

Your question isn't clear to me, but I guess you are asking about the ssh client instead of the ssh server/sshd. If so, you may find help in reviewing the ssh client parameters in /etc/ssh/ssh_config. There is no sleep mode in RPi. If that doesn't help, please try to add details to your question that provide clues we can use.


1

This is normal, if you have a new OS, you have a new fingerprint. Just do what it tells you: ssh-keygen -f "/home/amina/.ssh/known_hosts" -R "192.168.1.31" After that you can connect again. The warning is to avoid MITM attacks since in that case the signature would be wrong. So never execute that command if you don't know why it changed!


1

If you know the IP address or DNS are correct, you can use: $ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no pi@192.x.x.x This can be added to your ssh config, however, not recommended, after confirm the connection is ok, use the 'ssh-keygen' command suggested by ssh.


1

We don't know what operating system you are using on the PC. But just use your SSH client and connect to the RasPi using username pi and destination name raspberrypi. On a Unix like system it would look pc ~$ ssh pi@raspberrypi


1

You can use nmap to check open ports on your RPi: $ nmap raspberrypi Starting Nmap 7.80 ( https://nmap.org ) at 2020-12-24 17:24 CET Nmap scan report for raspberrypi (192.168.1.169) Host is up (0.0092s latency). Other addresses for raspberrypi (not scanned): fdd4:6b0c:9a70::616 rDNS record for 192.168.1.169: raspberrypi.lan Not shown: 999 closed ports PORT ...


1

You need to set the authentication global variable to VncAuth: Just issue the following command from cli and you will be prompted to enter a new password twice, that will be used to connect to your Raspberry PI from vnc: $ vncserver -Authentication VncAuth After you have set your password, just kill every running vncserver session using $ vncserver kill :X ...


1

Not a complete answer, but I think it's something to do with the on-board chip. I spent several days trying to fix this, trying everything I could find online, including trying multiple different OS's. Nothing worked. I just tried some cheap $30 USB adapter that a friend bought on Amazon though, and it worked immediately. I'd save your time and just buy an ...


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