New answers tagged

1

Your remark @LjmDullaart Yes, I forgot to include that. I set those permissions. Even tho the files are located in /home/pi/ and not /root/. As far as I remember I got an error otherwise and could not proceed any further reveals what is wrong. To access the Pi as root, the authorized_keys must be under /root/.ssh, with the permissions 700 for .ssh and 600 ...


0

You normally can't login as root as this is a security risk. Indeed Debian doesn't even have a root login because there is no need - use sudo instead. Normally you use sudo su to become root, but there are few circumstances that require this. If you really want to do this you will have to create a root login and configure the keys for the root user.


-1

I should confess and tell you that I use git for windows to access my pi, so git-bash gives me a minimal bash environment on Windows. You may prefer Putty or WSL etc. This method will work with Mac, Linux and WSL, and it answers the OPs question of "How do I". Assign the pi a static ip address use ~/.ssh/config to create your ssh "address ...


0

In Linux Mint 18.3, I have to go into Network Connections and edit the entry that shows up when the Zero W is plugged in. Go to the IPv4 Settings tab, and change Link-Local Only. After I do this, and wait about 15 seconds or so, I get a notifcation that Wired Connectiong #2 was made. Wired Connection #1 is my connection to my router; I am not on wifi. Then I ...


1

Make sure the default password, raspberry, is actually the default password for your pi operating system. I just realized, for example, that the pi-top operating system has a default password of pi-top, which is a super annoying thing for them to do, but it is what it is.


0

In my case a try to use ipv6 times out first. Try the -4 option. ssh -4 user@host or in your ssh client config set AddressFamily inet


1

You can do that but it is very difficult. This lite version is another version of the operating system.


0

It is theoretically possible but would require quite an effort. You are unlikely to find instructions to do so. The question is WHY? Other than saving a small amount of space there is no real benefit. Just use raspi-config to boot to the command line and the desktop won't run. You could copy /home to a lite installation. There will be a few small files which ...


1

The moment a network terminal becomes unresponsive it's usually already disconnected on the other end, so you're not installing anything anymore. Closing the disconnected terminal window will then have no effect. Note that interrupting an installation like that may lead to problems, especially when updating system packages such as the kernel. You should try ...


1

Your immediate problem stems from the fact that you have enabled sudo password (the Pi OS is configured to never ask for a password when running sudo), and then you try to run sudo non-interactively. Either put NOPASSWD back into your sudoers file, or learn how to provide a password to non-interactive sudo (e.g. sudo -S). Others already explained how copying ...


0

I figured out how to do it. I just went into raspberry pi config sudo raspi-config, went to network, and added a new network ssid. Then it automatically updated the wpa_supplicant file.


0

I had a same problem once, you may try to use GUI to join the wifi network if you have the chance, it will update your wpa_supplicant.conf file regarding your network.


0

I have 8 networks in my wpa_supplicant.conf - some on different continents and I can move seamlessly between them. There is no point in priority unless multiple networks are visible. Your file looks OK but not sure if psk=NONE is affecting results.


0

I don't see why it does not work properly; if it does not find the first network it should look for the other. You might debug this by looking at wpa_supplicant's output -- I am not sure where it is by default or if wpa_supplicant has its own service by default on RpiOS/Raspbian (I use customized dhcpcd scripts to manage that and discard the defaults when I ...


0

SSH has a really cool "jump host" option; basically, it allows you to jump through to another host on the network: -J destination Connect to the target host by first making a ssh connection to the jump host described by destination and then establishing a TCP forwarding to the ultimate destination from there. Multiple jump hops may be ...


0

I just had the idea whether the problem is related to the Public vs Private categorization of your LAN Ethernet network within Windows: some features are configured differently for these. Mine for example, when used without a router on it, typically gets categorized as Public. On Windows, open Powershell with administrator rights, and issue the following: ...


2

You could ssh onto the first pi as you do now and from that one ssh into the second one. This would expose fewer ports to the outside world.


Top 50 recent answers are included