57

You can embed the Raspberry Pi in any end-product you want. For mass production, the Compute Module may be a better choice. The Compute Module is a Raspberry Pi in a more flexible form factor, intended for industrial application. You cannot use the words Raspberry Pi to promote your product without permission. Raspberry Pi is trademarked. You will have ...


34

Streaming with HLS Apple's proprietary method of streaming live video. It is called HTTP Live Streaming (HLS) and is only supported by Apple's technology. Google (Chromium / YouTube) uses its own implementation called dash mpeg and everybody else is either confused or using H.264 encapsulated in MP4. PROS Can stream HD 1080p on LAN to any device that ...


25

UV4L MMAL Thanks to comment from @mpromonet for the update on the Linux-Projects V4L2 driver that now implements MMAL very efficiently - but it is still a work in progress. Follow these instructions to install the linux-project repository and install the UV4L driver with extras. Then install the server and mjpeg. If you want, you can experiment with the ...


25

and I quote from Raspberry Pi's blog If, like Brian, you’re making a product which requires a Raspberry Pi to run, we don’t ask you to buy special permission or licences from us to use it. All we ask is that you include the words “Powered by Raspberry Pi” somewhere on your packaging. If your business is successful, we’d be very grateful if you could ...


15

It depends how you define "mass" in "mass production". If you're talking hundreds, the Pi is probably a good choice. If you're talking thousands, there might be "better" solutions available through OEM. "Better" as in price, availability, quantity, security and specific functionality. Price - $30 dollar a pop might not be much for a couple of devices, ...


12

rmmod bcm2835-v4l2 modprobe bcm2835-v4l2 Destroys and re-creates /dev/video0 Just ran into the same problem and that fixed it for me.


11

Streaming with MJPEG U4VL A kernel interface with a build in HTTP(S) server. http://www.linux-projects.org/uv4l/tutorials/streaming-server/ Raspberry Pi Cam Web interface A nice project by silvanmelchior that deploys a web server, dvr like, multi target streaming server. Needs more information https://github.com/silvanmelchior/RPi_Cam_Web_Interface ...


11

Nothing wrong at all with goldilocks answer above, but here's an additional one that deals specifically with the picamera API. You can use a custom output to perform such a split (as many ways as you like) and send the output to a variety of destinations. In your case, if you wanted to record to a file and a socket you could do something like this: #!/usr/...


10

As of 2017 (or perhaps earlier) raspivid is no longer the preferred method, with the Pi devs recommending people use V4L2 instead. So this method allows you to stream H264 via RTP using V4L2 instead of raspivid. I noticed this method results in fewer dropouts and allows a higher bitrate: #!/bin/sh # Use V4L2 (preferred) instead of raspivid # ...


9

With Ubuntu 14.10 and Gstreamer I reach 100 to 116 ms latency with 1280 x 720 @ 60Hz. Tanks to @Antonvh who puts me on the right way. I reproduce here the solution for latter reference. To stream from the Pi : raspivid -t 0 -b 2000000 -fps 60 -w 1280 -h 720 -o - \ | gst-launch-1.0 -e -vvv fdsrc ! h264parse ! rtph264pay pt=96 config-interval=5 \ ! ...


9

The options: raspivid -t 0 -o - | nc -k -l 1234 raspivid -t 0 -o - | cvlc stream:///dev/stdin --sout "#rtp{sdp=rtsp://:1234/}" :demux=h264 cvlc v4l2:///dev/video0 --v4l2-chroma h264 --sout '#rtp{sdp=rtsp://:1234/}' raspivid -t 0 -o - | gst-launch-1.0 fdsrc ! h264parse ! rtph264pay config-interval=1 pt=96 ! gdppay ! tcpserversink host=SERVER_IP ...


8

There's a simple way to do it with VLC, this post explains step by step how to do it, in few words this is the way you do it: After having the camera fully set and ready to be used(connected and enabled), now you need to download the package that will perform the live streaming functionality, getting it is as simple as just executing this command in your ...


8

If you want to use the PI exclusively as a HTPC or media center, you could use a distribution geared towards such applications. OpenELEC/XBMC /RasBMC seem to be the obvious choice. I did try OpenELEC at one time, but getting WiFi to work reliably on it seemed to be a pain. Here's how I went about using Raspbian (since I use the RPi for tasks other than ...


7

I'm amazed there isn't more action on this thread, I've been chasing down the answer to this question for months. I stream from a Pi Camera (CSI) to a Janus server, and I found the best pipeline is gst-launch-1.0 v4l2src ! video/x-h264, width=$width, height=$height, framerate=$framerate/1 ! h264parse ! rtph264pay config-interval=1 pt=96 ! udpsink sync=...


7

You can send raw 264 frames to a browser through websocket and decode in in javascript. Latency < 0.1s :p I wrote an opensource project in this manner, checkout https://github.com/131/h264-live-player


6

I had the same problem, found this thread when searching for a hardware encoder, not for c920 issues. Nevertheless, execute a firmware update for the raspberry pi and the garbage should be gone $> sudo rpi-update I myself found the solution here: http://wiki.matthiasbock.net/index.php/Logitech_C920,_streaming_H.264#Raspberry_Pi


6

The easiest way I have found, to get a live videofeed from an headless raspberry pi, with a raspberry pi camera. This solution works right out of the box, without installing additional software on the PI. On the PI: raspivid -t 0 -l -o tcp://0.0.0.0:3333 On the Computer, one can stream with VLC: vlc tcp/h264://192.168.66.154:3333 (assuming 192.168.66....


6

The only modern way to stream H264 to a browser is with UV4L: no latency, no configuration, with optional audio, optional two-way audio/video. No magic GStreamer sauce, yet it's possible to extend its usage.


6

The tee command reads from standard input and copies to any number of files plus standard output by default, see man tee for more details. This means you can ask tee to create a file from input and then pipe the output to something else. The addition of an extra pipe does in theory add a bit of inefficiency. As to whether this is significant or not you ...


6

As Qualcuno pointed out yesterday, the RPi (all models) does not have support for hardware acceleration of H.265 video sources. As such, the RPi just doesn't have the raw horsepower needed to decode higher resolution videos on the fly. Will an MPEG-2 License help? MPEG-2 is a totally different encoding type, so no it won't help your case. do I even ...


6

There is a proper Netflix addon but it uses Kodi 17 (krypton)'s newly implemented InputStream API. However, Kodi 17 still isn't enough for running the plugin, Netflix uses DRM encryption which is only supported in the Kodi 18 nightly builds. At the time writing, OSMC is using Kodi 17 wich doesn't support this feature. My sugestion is using raspbian (or other ...


5

To stream to services like UStream you can use ffmpeg: ffmpeg -f video4linux2 -i /dev/video0 -qscale 1 -r 25 -vcodec libx264 -b 636k -aspect 4:3 -s 640x480 -ar 44100 -ab 64k -async 1 -g 6 -threads 2 -f flv "${RTMP_URL}/${KEY} flashver=FME/2.5\20(compatible;\20FMSc\201.0)" Where: /dev/video0: where your webcam is connected on Linux RTMP_URL: Ustream ...


5

That's probably not what you are wanting from answers, but I do not recommend VLC streaming at all.. For a school project, I tried some streaming options (on RPi too!) : VLC MJPEG GStreamer Using VLC and MJPEG (and some other less known), I had latency between 3 and 5 seconds.. Using GStreamer, NO LATENCY and with a best resolution (and lots of more ...


5

For me I got it to work by running this: sudo apt-get install uv4l-server sudo apt-get install uv4l-uvc sudo apt-get install uv4l-xscreen sudo apt-get install uv4l-mjpegstream Link url


5

Well, according to this reply from the ReadyMedia author (formerly known as miniDLNA), subtitles are not meant to be used through the DLNA protocol. I could see the subtitles on my LG TV because LG added some features to the DLNA protocol (that seems to be used by my Synology NAS though). The ReadyMedia author does not want to implement specific features as ...


5

Few hours ago I tried with a Samsung smart TV and I have to say (or type): Now, miniDLNA supports srt files so you don't have to implement something else


5

I had the same problem but only it would sometime play 30s, sometime 90s but not more. It was omxplayer which exited. I added the option --timeout 20 to omxplayer so the command line looks like this: livestreamer hlsvarient://ekonk...akamaihd../live/master.m3u8 --player "omxplayer --timeout 20" --fifo In fact as HLS works with 10s chunks, the player ...


5

Or for simplicity replace "format_id" with "best" (best: Select best quality format represented by single file with video and audio): omxplayer `youtube-dl -g -f best <youtube-url>` # play the video https://github.com/rg3/youtube-dl/blob/master/README.md#format-selection


5

A RPI3 can decode 1080p HEVC quite well. There have been NEON optimizations to HW-accelerate HEVC decoding. Best played with KODI. The problem is a RPI3 is running hot, so it starts throttling, an RPI3+ has much less thermal issues. Nowadays a RPI3+ can even decode 10bit 1080p HEVC pretty well. Use the latest KODI/LibreElec builds for the best performance.


5

The official Raspberry Pi Camera does not support 4K, so No - If that is what you wanted. If you have a USB 2.0 4K camera1 that can dump encoded data then yes. As long as the driver is picked up you can use any software you like to capture the stream, even UV4L userspace driver. I do not think USB 2.0 has enough bandwidth for RAW2 capture but possibly if ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible