29

Found it! sudo nano /boot/config.txt add : dtoverlay=w1-gpio this has to do with kernel update, find more info in this link


18

Given that your sensor is a DS18B20, which uses the 1-wire protocol, and that the 1-wire driver on the latest RPi Linux kernel can do as many as 64 different addresses on the same 1-wire bus: If you just connect all of your sensors to the same 3 pins (3v3, GND and GPIO4 - pin number 4 on the connector), you will read their outputs from /sys/bus/w1/devices/28*...


17

It'll go way down to < -70°C according to the article: Raspberry Pi proven to be stable when submerged in liquid nitrogen. UPDATE 29JUN2020: The above link is nolonger working. A similar article can be found here.


16

The $ sounds like you might be trying to use jQuery. If this is the case, you may want to download and install it as well. Since you are on the Pi, I would also recommend trying to write your own web application using Tornado. It is written using Python (the Pi's favourite language), and I always find it very easy to create web applications using it. Just ...


15

I found an answer at http://www.raspberrypi.org forums. You can read the CPU temp via bash script. Save this script as getTemp.sh in /usr/local/bin folder and give execute permission with chmod +x /usr/local/bin/getTemp.sh command. Then run it, you will get temp values. #!/bin/bash cpuTemp0=$(cat /sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0/temp) cpuTemp1=$(($cpuTemp0/...


15

I don't think that should be happening. There is an explanation of the thermometer icon here updated last month, and it says it comes on halfway at 80°C, when the CPU should begin throttling due to overheating. Then at 85°C it changes to a full thermometer. However, that is the maximum recommended operating temperature. The Pi should not be getting that ...


14

No a heatsink is not required, The Pi3 has been reported to generate more heat than previous models, but the heatsink is not required. You can install it for some extra thermal protection, but the Pi will throttle the clock speed to maintain a safe temperature. Heatsinks are included in many of these kits to increase the perceived value.


13

Some time ago I wrote an article "Raspberry Pi :: Monitoring CPU temperature with RRDTOOL" about the same problem. My solution includes receiving temperature from CPU, saving it into the round-robin database and building a nice graph as .PNG file, that is quite easy to put on the web page -- just copy it wherever you want. I hope you'll find it useful.


13

You can read the file /sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0/temp, as specified in this answer. There it's about measuring from the command line, and the file is read with cat. But you should be able to just open the file in C. The temperature is returned in milli-degrees Centigrade and as ASCII numbers. Perhaps like this, not tested :) FILE *temperatureFile; ...


12

For those coming here from Google. You can get Raspberry CPU temp in Python using gpiozero package. pip install gpiozero Create your temp.py from gpiozero import CPUTemperature cpu = CPUTemperature() print(cpu.temperature) Output : $ python temp.py 56.92


11

I have eight pi3s in a room which is 22-24°C. They range in temperature between ~45°C and ~50°C when idle, with each pi being fairly consistent in temperature +-2°C (sorry, not terribly accurate values, they are from squinting at a plot). Mine aren't in any kind of enclosure, but are mounted on the underside of a plate with reasonably free air flow. So your ...


10

My experience with Raspberry Pi 3: The SoC will start to throttle down at approximately 80 degrees Celsius, and will, in my experience, never allow itself to be warmer than 85 degrees Celsius. This is of course the core temperature - the temperature outside the chip will have to be much lower to facilitate efficient heat exchange. While you (probably, don't ...


10

More information on this will be available as and when the units start arriving with purchasers and we get a clearer picture of overclocking capabilities and such. To the best of my knowledge the figures from the benchmarking done by the pimoroni.com blog are accurate: In terms of CPU temperature, the Raspberry Pi 3 runs significantly hotter than the Pi ...


10

As the answers state, no heatsinks are required. However, following on from Snowman's comment to Maxthon Chan's answer, and taking some examples from the Raspberry Pi site1, should you want to check/measure the temperature that your Pi is running at, you can use the command: /opt/vc/bin/vcgencmd measure_temp Should you find yourself using this command ...


8

I see the OP's question has been answered authoritatively, but here are my 2 cents worth of experience: With the basic clear plastic no-fan enclosure and heat sinks the ARM AP runs at about 50C (122F), and my Pi3 works fine. When I take off the top part of the plastic shell the temperature drops to 47-48. So my conclusion is that the enclosure is not ...


8

I think using watch command is much easier, for example: watch {your command} In your case, it will be: watch vcgencmd measure_temp That will refresh by 2 seconds, if you want to define the interval by yourself (5 second maybe), you can type: watch -n 5 <your command> In your case, it will be: watch -n 5 vcgencmd measure_temp You can cancel ...


7

As discussed here What's the maximum / minimum running temperature? and taken right from the official FAQ: What is the usable temperature range? The Raspberry Pi is built from commercial chips which are qualified to different temperature ranges; the LAN9512 is specified by the manufacturers being qualified from 0°C to 70°C, while the AP is ...


6

You put the heatsinks directly on top of the CPU and the Ethernet/USB micro controller. Like this: RPi Heatsinks Usually, 99 times out of 100, you won't need heatsinks.


6

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2016-02-19 22:24 thermal_zone0 -> ../../devices/virtual/thermal/thermal_zone0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 2016-02-25 17:31 /sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0/subsystem/thermal_zone0 -> ../../devices/virtual/thermal/thermal_zone0


6

Connecting the DS18B20 to the Ethernet port would either not work or the effort to make it work (even if it was possible) would be excessive for someone starting out with a Raspberry Pi. As you state, cut off the RJ45 and connect the sensor with the black wire to ground, the red wire to the 3V3 pin and the blue or yellow (some are blue and some are yellow) ...


6

I have a RPI3 with a mini heatsink, like the following image: Both heat sinks (14x14x11 mm and 9x9x12 mm) are made of aluminium and the fan is a SEPA MF15B-05 (15x15x5mm, 5V-0.06A) that is soldered to the printed circuit board (so it is permanent :P) So the iddle temperature with Raspbian Lite, WIFI connection and SSH active connection is about ~37°C in a ...


6

As noted in the Raspberry Pi FAQ: The Raspberry Pi is built from commercial chips which are qualified to different temperature ranges; the LAN9514 (LAN9512 on older models with 2 USB ports) is specified by the manufacturers as being qualified from 0°C to 70°C, while the SoC is qualified from -40°C to 85°C. You may well find that the board will work ...


5

The default desktop environment (DE) on raspbian is LXDE. If you search online (e.g.) with regard to this issue, you'll find a chorus of crickets -- meaning no one cares that much. If this is very important to you, you could figure out exactly where the widget comes from and try and contact who's responsible, although I would guess by this point they are ...


5

See related: Firmware 3.18.x breaks I²C, SPI, audio, lirc, 1-wire (e.g. /dev/i2c-1, No such file or directory) Basically, the latest firmware for the Raspberry Pi enables Device Tree, and also breaks the myriad tutorials for getting 1Wire devices (like the DS18B20) working through GPIO. The fix is pretty simple: Edit /boot/config.txt Add the line ...


5

/opt/vc/bin/vcgencmd measure_temp This returns the same thing as reading /sys/class/thermal, i.e., the core temp. Reading the /sys file is preferable programmatically because it is just a sequence of open/read system calls, instead of a fork/execute plus a bunch of open/read/write with pipes. How would I read the GPU temperature aswell? The BCM2835/6 ...


5

The DS18B20 is a digital sensor using the Dallas 1-wire protocol. If you just want to get figures to play with you could, as you say, connect an ADC and twiddle a pot. However a simpler, and perhaps more useful, source of data is the SOC (System on a Chip) temperature. The following C snippet will print the SOC temperature. void get_SOC_temp() { FILE *...


5

Yes, as the temperature rises the CPU frequency is lowered to prevent damage. The throttling begins around 82 degree Celsius. You can check the CPU Frequency with the following command: cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_cur_freq or using the GUI widget. The following links provide additional info and benchmarks: http://www.sbeddoes.com/...


5

The simple answer is it won't hurt to try anything. Signal loss is a product of resistance, and all conductors have some inherent resistance, which decreases with the wire thickness (gauge) and increases with its length. So if the wire is too long or otherwise includes too much resistance to work, it simply won't work, and no harm done. Anecdotally, I'll ...


5

That's the main problem with the Enviro pHAT, and the SenseHAT for that matter - proximity to the Pi affecting results. You're better off getting a Dallas 1-wire temperature sensor, preferably one with a long cable (such as, and this is just an example, the one contained in CamJam EduKit 2), or extend one without a lead by using jumper cables. This will let ...


5

The following shell script uses the videocore utility vcgencmd measure_temp to get a line like temp=37.4'C. It then does some string magic to isolate the 37 from that string, which is then compared to 35. If it's smaller, it waits a second, then tests the temperature again. If it's 35 or more, $HOT_PID is killed. That PID was set to the program in question, ...


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