5

Each individual DS18B20 has its own unique ID # assigned at the factory. That device will have the same ID for its entire life and will never change. So if you unplug it from one host computer and plug into another, the ID will remain the same. As I recall from reading the spec. sheet for the device, the ID is stored in non-volatile bits in the device and ...


5

No, the device id does not change, it is hardwired into the DS18B20.


4

Unfortunately the CPUTemperature class does not support reading from a remote Pi, even if you provide a remote pin factory. There's an issue to add it but it's probably not a priority: https://github.com/gpiozero/gpiozero/issues/581 For now you can try doing it with pigpio itself: http://abyz.me.uk/rpi/pigpio/python.html#file_open


4

I didn't understand why the temperature measured by the psutil is not matching with the temperature measured by the vcgencmd. To get the CPU Temperature which is reported by vcgencmd using python I can use the following code. from gpiozero import CPUTemperature cpu = CPUTemperature() print(cpu.temperature) or def get_cpu_temp(): tempFile = open( "/...


3

The fan is not connected to a GPIO. The GPIO can not supply enough current to power a fan (they can supply perhaps 20 milliamps at 3.3 volts). If you attempt to power a fan (or any inductive load such as a DC motor) from the GPIO you will likely destroy the GPIO and the Pi. The video shows that the fan is connected to a 5V pin and a ground pin on the ...


3

The only way to "stop" the Raspberry Pi from running is to remove power. If you're supplying power through the USB-C connector, just pull that out. The red LED will go out, and you'll see it cool down then. :) A bit different on RPi than many Linux boxes. Usually shutdown powers down, but that's not the case with Raspberry Pi.


3

Your question should be "Which material has a lower thermal resistance: thermal paste, or thermal pads"? The material with the lower thermal resistance will keep the temperature of your components coolest for any given heat sink. To find the answer to your question, we should do an Internet search. This search yields a link that contains the answer to your ...


3

You've not told us which RPi you are using. For example, a Pi Zero consumes less power, and generates less heat than the RPi4B. That will matter quite a lot when you get to the detailed design stage; when you need to determine what your objective Junction Temperature is, and how much cooling you need to meet that objective. Are Heat Pipes a Solution? If ...


2

What temperature range is normal or... how hot is too hot? My Pi 4B's with a decent heat management system (I've used several varieties) will typically run in the mid to upper 30°C's to the low-mid 40°C's when either idle or under typical/normal workloads (not pegging the CPU cores). Anything under 50°C is great! It is possible to stay in this temperature ...


2

In that case you can use two more fans and detach that fan which is connected with pi. Find two processor fans of 12V and an adapter. Attach them in parallel. Put one on top and another on one side. You can make this more cool with this setting. ALso try to use an armor heat shrink.Liquid cooling is also a good option. 70D C is quite good. But try to keep ...


2

If the temperature of a Pi4 rises this much, you either have a poor case with impaired circulation and/or have not installed latest firmware updates. It is simple to implement Fan control based on temperature. I use a heatsink case, and even running a stress test the temperature barely exceeded 60℃ See https://forum.core-electronics.com.au/t/how-to-stress-...


2

That will depend on things that you've not told us. But not to worry, because we'd have a hard time answering your question with any authority even if you had! That sounds nonsensical, but here's what we know, and why a definitive answer is difficult: The RPi 4 has what you might think of as a closed-loop thermal management system that is "baked in&...


2

You can move heat in two ways and by using the plastic sealed box it gets very difficult to use either conduction or convection. Convection (movement of heat) will literally hit a wall of the plastic box and as you rightly surmise, the temperature will just keep increasing inside the box till the Pi gives up though heat. I would say that no box is fully ...


2

A lot of sed-work for a few words... how about this instead?: echo "Actual CPU $(vcgencmd measure_temp)" Instead of an alias, you could also put this in a function: cputemp () { printf '%s' "Actual CPU "; vcgencmd measure_temp; } This function can be declared in the same file as an alias (e.g. ~/.bashrc). Execute the function same as an alias - just ...


2

Use \ to escape characters. alias temp="vcgencmd measure_temp | sed \"s/'/°/g\" | sed \"s/temp=/Actual CPU temperature /g\""


2

In the comments, you may have gotten the advice not to start soldering with mains. I would agree with them, though a solution exists. In my home I use a remote controlled switching system, based on 433MHz. What I have is called "Klikaanklikuit" and the website of the vendor boasts that it is also available in Spain. But others exist. If you wire a ...


1

"Is it safe to run a Raspberry Pi 4B non-stop for a very long time (several years) without a reboot at 45-50°C? Would it be significantly better for the SoC to run at 35-40°C instead?" Your question invites speculation and opinion. That's not to say it's an irrelevant question - only that it's couched in non-specific terms. I'll try to provide some ...


1

Use a passive cooler for Raspberry Pi 4. For example this one is good.


1

I can't comment on whether Ubuntu makes things worse, but the P4 is subject to overheating. Firmware upgrades ameliorated some of the problems but many users have resorted to proper heatsinks, fans and/or cases. The official case is unusable - it has no ventilation and those tiny heatsinks make little difference. My official case is in my junk box along ...


1

Just be aware that low cost devices MAY have the same address hardwired in them... If in doubt - buy from reputable sellers (the temp readings are also more consistent I find).


1

Ah let me see. If the "flat plate" comes with the Rpi4B case, then there is a big chance that it is for the "cpu". There are electronics hobbyists shops that sell thick flat copper plates to be placed on top of the cpu, then aluminium heat sink and/or cpu fans on top of the flat guy. Expensive copper "sinks" (transfers) heat faster and can "store" more ...


1

To enable 1-wire run raspi-config and go to Interfacing Options -> 1-Wire (This will add dtoverlay=w1–gpio at the end of /boot/config.txt. Default pin is GPIO 4. If you would like to use a custom pin you have to manually change this line to dtoverlay=w1-gpio,gpiopin=x where x is other GPIO pin number) Reboot the Pi To list all devices that Raspberry ...


1

I know nothing about this kit, but the following is an example of how to control a fan only when needed. https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/a/105820/8697 There is no way to control a fan without additional circuitry.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible