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9

If you have problems with SD-cards you should try (in order): Use another (bigger) power supply. Connect a powered hub in between the Raspberry and any USB peripheral you may have. Use SD-cards of well known brands. Use a bigger SD-card (for distributed wear leveling). Set your rootfs to read-only and thus avoid writing to the SD-card. Use a "...


9

This is from the RaspberryPi Website: Yesterday, we introduced the first of two new boot modes which have now been added to the Raspberry Pi 3. Today, we introduce an even more exciting addition: network booting a Raspberry Pi with no SD card For the Pi 1+2: Can I use network boot with Raspberry Pi / Pi 2? Unfortunately, because the code is ...


7

No - it is not possible, in my opinion - there is nowhere to store the code needed to behave differently. Unlike PCs with network cards fitted with a bootroms/on-board flash (useful for the Linux Terminal Server Project), even if there is an inherent capability in the Arm core there is no provision to access it - remember: much of the functionality is ...


5

There's some suggestion that while you still have to use an SDCard to boot, you may be able to do it with a single file (the latest bootcode.bin). The advantage of this is that the file/filesystem is only ever accessed read only making corruption a hell of a lot less likely. Check out: https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/hardware/raspberrypi/bootmodes/...


4

Yes it is possible, the offical Raspberry Pi site wrote about it. I don't want to write a new Tutorial about it because the already did a woderful job at it. Link to raspberry.org


4

Raspberry Pi 3 fully supports PXE network boot. Per MagPi issue 43, page 10: the Foundation had some final input for Broadcom in order to add two new features: direct USB mass-storage and PXE network boot capabilities. "Gordon rewrote the boot ROM for the chip and then provided an updated boot ROM to Broadcom, saying 'shove this in the chip, it'll work,'"...


3

I had similar issues with Buildroot 2017.5: The kernel ran fine without u-boot, but when booted via u-boot it was hanging after "Starting kernel...". It turned out that the predefined address for the device tree ${fdt_addr_r} was causing the problem (looks like there was some overlap with the kernel). Loading the device tree to 0x2000000 worked for me: mmc ...


3

I can't comment on Anocs answer so I'll add this twitter quote from the Director of Engineering as a source of info about PXE on the Pi3. Basically it's not ready yet, but it is in the pipeline. Possibly for Pi2 and Pi1 as well.


3

First of all 'Raspberry Pi' is not an operating system so you have to tell the name which linux distribution you're using. I'm using BerryBoot to boot my 4 linux distribution which are installed on my USB disk. To find out where the config.txt and to modifying it, you have to mount BerryBoot installed device. It's formatted as FAT32. Find the device ...


2

You had to create a partition and put berryboot's files there on install; these also contained a config.txt. I suspect your question asks how to access this from within one of the distributions you installed. Under openelec it's in /var/media/<some id>, raspbian and archlinux on arm install it under /boot/. A semi user friendly console editor is nano ...


2

You would load the uboot.bin instead of the linux kernel.img file. So fourth stage if you count: SoC ROM boot code bootcode.bin from the SD-card start???.elf from the SD-card uboot.bin from the SD-card The first 3 stages run in the GPU.


2

Only the Raspberry Pi 3 can boot from network without special software on an inserted SD Card (you need to use U-Boot or a sepcial bootcode.bin on older models). The instructions for the Pi 3 are here. Since you have a Pi2 , an alternative approach is to use a rootfs over NFS , as demonstrated by PiNet. BerryBoot (Linux only) supports booting via iSCSI or ...


2

I had the same problem. In my case, the following instructions fixed the problem: install, boot, sudo apt upgrade, reboot u-boot error plug microSD to PC edit 'device_tree_address' on config.txt # original device_tree_address=0x100 device_tree_end=0x8000 # modified device_tree_address=0x02008000 insert microSD to Pi3 again boot ...


2

I resolved the problem in half. In order to display an image on the framebuffer console when raspberry pi boots you need to compile the kernel with your image. The default image is located at: ~/linux/drivers/video/logo/logo_linux_clut224.ppm You need to have your image in jpeg/png etc. then you need to use netpbm to convert the image to ppm. Use the ...


2

Make sure you have the below entries in the config.txt for arm64 support : arm_64bit=1 device_tree_address=0x100 device_tree_end=0x8000 Optionally, add 'enable_uart=1' if you need serial console support. If needed add boot.scr.uimg to the boot partition to load the kernel from u-boot (u-boot looks for this file unless you disabled auto-boot while building ...


1

With the Raspberry Pi 3B+ the foundation has extended the boot process. You can select different boot modes through pull ups on specific GPIO pins. You will also find hints to speed up the boot process. I don't know on which stage in the boot process U-Boot comes to play and if it helps at all. But have a look at the Raspberry Pi boot modes.


1

This is definitely possible. By default u-boot performs run distro_bootcmd on boot. This is defined at compile-time by the CONFIG_BOOTCOMMAND variable. I can simply set my own CONFIG_BOOTCOMMAND and compile u-boot: cat <<EOF >> include/configs/rpi.h #define CONFIG_BOOTCOMMAND \\ "setenv autoload no;" \\ "...


1

In my case, the FDT file provided in the firmware package was incorrect and caused the kernel to hang. When booting, the firmware passes an internal version of the FDT to u-boot, and this one worked. So, instead of loading the FDT from a file, I had to pass the version provided by the firmware. The address of the provided FDT is in the variable ...


1

@pradeepmcp i was facing same issue , but now it got fixed https://plus.google.com/u/0/+StephenWarren/posts/G1sJ1RD4qPr?cfem=1 this helped me .. there is an issue with qemu and u-boot for rpi2 Machine. but https://github.com/0xabu/qemu will work though :) with the above qemu i am able to get u-boot working.


1

You are using incorrect ARM compiler here. IIUC, you are trying to build aarch64 u-boot with arm-linux-gnueabi-gcc toolchain, which is wrong. AArch64 u-boot require aarch64-linux-gnu-gcc to build.


1

The VideoCore series is quite old. At least older than 2004. ARM cores used to be a lot weaker in the past, especially for video decoding. The VideoCore was used in millions of devices, a lot of custom firmware has been written for it. The VideoCore firmware only runs on VideoCore since it uses the VideoCore vector processing extensions (this was before ARM ...


1

Not sure if this helps, but from what I've read about the design of the Pi and the use of Broadcom's SoC, the CPU and GPU are on the same chip and share memory, and on early models there was only pre-determined splits of RAM between the two Units until that was made obsolete by a new version of start.elf, so this might be the most efficient or most backwards ...


1

zImage is just a common name for a compressed kernel image. U-boot is capable of loading and booting various kernel images formats. The arch linux one should be ok. DTB files are compiled Device Tree files that the linux kernel uses to configure the hardware. more on it here : http://elinux.org/Device_Tree To configure U-boot I advise you to use the uEnv....


1

You might want to use a USB flash drive/USB hard drive. They're useully more reliable then SD cards Here's a thread that describes how to do it


1

You should not be experiencing frequent dramatic corruption, even if the power is occasionally lost. If a filesystem has a non zero value in the sixth column of /etc/fstab, it will be checked to see if it is necessary to scan it for errors before it is mounted. Regular pi distros (should) have this set for /dev/mmcblk0p1 and the root filesystem partition (...


1

your error message clearly says: "* "System not configured - see README", that means you haven't configured your build system, it has no idea what board you need u-boot built for, and details about configuration could be found in README file -- read it and get enlightened. most likely the following command will do the trick: make rpi_b_config


1

I am doing similar things as you and unfortunately I already see these and worse problems. I used bootp, dhcp (which is the same in the u-boot case), pxe and boot over nfs/tftp up to now and I've seen each and everyone of them hang so far, with and without traffic of the sort corresponding to the current stage to be seen on the adapter. Unfortunately I ...


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