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24

Preparation First, we need to install the required prerequisites. I assume you have sudo access. sudo apt-get install git ncurses-dev make gcc-arm-linux-gnueabi git is the version control system used by the Linux kernel team. ncurses is a library for build console menus. It is necessary for menuconfig. make runs the compilation for us. gcc-arm-linux-...


17

From the Official FAQ Page: What Linux distros will be supported at launch? Fedora, Debian and ArchLinux will be supported from the start. We hope to see support from other distros later. (Because of issues with newer releases of Ubuntu and the ARM processor we are using, Ubuntu can’t commit to support Raspberry Pi at the moment.) You will be ...


15

Make sure you have enabled SSH on your Raspberry Pi: pi@raspberrypi$ sudo raspi-config >> Interface Settings >> SSH >> ENABLE I think that will solve your problem.


14

First, install two packages on your Ubuntu system: qemu-user, and proot. After you mount the Raspbian SD card, you can do the equivalent of a 'chroot' with: sudo proot -q qemu-arm -S /mnt/path/to/raspbian/ From there, you can use apt-get commands as though you are actually on the Raspberry Pi. (Use the exit command to exit.)


12

The Hard Way Read my other answer on Is it possible to update, upgrade and install software before flashing an image?. You need to calculate the offset of the filesystem you wish to mount. The Easy, yet experimental way Consider using my new utility piimg. Just build and run $ sudo ./piimg mount archlinuxarm-13-06-2012.img /mnt NOTE This hasn't been ...


10

tl;dr Most likely the Pi is routing the audio through the HDMI port, run the following command to make it use the 3.5mm plug output: amixer cset name='PCM Playback Route' 1 more detailed answer Out of the box, the Pi has 2 audio sinks or outputs: HDMI and the 3.5mm plug, if a display is connected the Pi defaults to using HDMI audio. You can change the ...


9

later I found out another solution to make it work for Remmina 0.9.99.1. You can change the security authentication for the VNC server to be VNC Password instead of Unix password and create an admin user credentials so you can use it in the remote connection as the following: On VNC Server side on Raspberry Pi 3 Go to the options on the VNC Server on ...


9

The Pi doesn't have a hardware clock, so any time you set will not be persisted on reboot. Instead, the system might reset to a default (possibly Unix timestamp 0, i.e. 1970-01-01) when it reboots because it has no way to know the actual time. There are a few ways to work around the fact that there's no hardware real-time clock (RTC) built in to the Pi: ...


8

Short answer. You cannot currently install Ubuntu. There is no port for ARMv6. Earlier versions (jaunty, karmic) had limited support.


8

I have not used Snappy Core, but here's a few objective reasons: Snappy Core is compiled for ARMv7, which means the software will better exploit the Pi 2's processor. Whether this makes that much of a difference I don't know; according to Diederik de Haas' comment below, Rasbpian's ARMv6 is almost the same as Debian's ARMv7 anyway (presuming that is the ...


8

I must admit to being totally confused by Ubuntu Snappy core. I think it is meant to be an Internet of Things application. That is a minimal core system without desktop support. I don't think it is usable as a desktop system on the Raspberry Pi. I don't think there is currently even a working way to add further applications to the core system. If you ...


7

John, RaspberryPi is essentially a computer all by itself. To boot up and make it all work nicely you will need a few things. A standard size SD card MicroUSB power cable (like the one used to change your phone) If you want to see the output, you will need a display, either connected over HDMI or the RCA Video Outputs. Once you have the SD Card, you will ...


7

The GPU supports GLES2.0 plus a couple of additional features. With the open driver (enable it with raspi-config), you get GLES 2.0, and GL 2.1 with a few rarely-used features missing.


7

It is possible to install Atom on the Raspberry Pi. I did it on Ubuntu Mate (but I guess it works the same way with Raspbian). Instructions You got to install some dependencies with the terminal emulator. Install all the dependencies: sudo apt-get install build-essential git libgnome-keyring-dev fakeroot gconf2 gconf-service libgtk2.0-0 libudev1 ...


7

According to the Mate website you will need a Pi2B / 3B(+) or later to run any Mate version. It does not run on the single processor (BCM2835) models Ubuntu MATE for the Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3


6

No for at least a couple of reasons. Distribution ISOs tend to be solely INTEL/AMD CPU based, not ARM as used by the PI. The Raspberry Pi is an ARMv6 architecture. The major distributions only support more recent architectures (although Debian, at least, support ARMv6 with soft float packages). Similar reasoning may be applied to the other boards you ...


6

I think the best reason someone could install Snappy (in the Raspberry Pi, or any other arch) is the isolation that every Snappy package will have. If you are trying to use your Raspberry Pi for a project that could handle deployable software components, then the Snappy packages (like Docker packages) are a really good way to maintain those components and ...


6

If you want to install git on Ubuntu Core you'll need to install it using apt. You can install classic in order to get it. snap install classic --edge --devmode sudo classic sudo apt update sudo apt install git Unfortunately, with this solution, anytime you want to run git you will need to first run sudo classic Source


6

I would like a more convenient method which doesn't involve editing a file and rebooting. You can't. Well, that's not quite true; you could do it without rebooting but you would have to restart the GUI using a different configuration (see below). Dynamic rotation in the GUI is normally handled by the Xorg server. Xorg uses a userland driver for the display ...


6

Yes. Here's what I use: hdparm -B 127 /dev/sda hdparm -S 242 /dev/sda From the command line as the pi user you would have to add sudo there. The first line enables spin down. The second one sets it to happen after 1 hour of inactivity. This is documented in man hdparm. You may need to sudo apt install hdparm first. Beware that's the device node (sda),...


6

Based on the name HASSbian, you are likely on a Debian derivative. You can get the name of the distrubution with the following command line command: cat /etc/*-release Note this will likely return HASSbian. However if you look at the VERSION line it will likely return Jessie or Wheezy (these are Debian releases). Assuming my assumption is correct you ...


6

The steps below were found to provide a persistent WiFi setup using netplan with Ubuntu Server 18.04 ubuntu-18.04.2-preinstalled-server-arm64+raspi3.img.xz image on a Raspberry Pi 3 B+. Update system: sudo apt update sudo apt full-upgrade sudo reboot Determine interface names: ip link show # 1: lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> … # 2: eth0: <BROADCAST,...


5

Anything you redirect to /dev/null gets dumped out an airlock. For example if you were to cat /boot/kernel.img > /dev/null what's happened is effectively nothing. Of course, cat /boot/kernel.img would normally just write to the terminal, which is also only a short-term memory cache on the screen. That never gets written to the SD either. There are ...


5

Sending output to /dev/null means "throw it away". It has no impact on your SD card at all. Of course, the commands that you're running prior and piping to /dev/null may well be affecting your SD card.


5

The maximum resolution the rPi can output (through its VideoCore IV chip) is 1920x1080. This is a 16:9 aspect ratio. This link on raspberrypi.org shows that it is possible to get a 21:9 aspect ratio working - There are people that report being able to run at 2560x1080 on OpenELEC. You will need to play with the HDMI timings in config.txt. Executing ...


5

Seem like I found the answer. It is possible in Ubuntu to add the following lines: start_x=1 gpu_mem=128 to /boot/firmware/config to manually enable the camera. After this the modprobe command works.


5

I have not used Ubuntu Snappy, and that they decided to name the package manager snappy makes me cringe and want to throttle someone because of all the confusion that is bound to ensue in internet searches, etc. This one is even more dunder-headed than the Raspberry Pi Foundation's choice of model names. But it still did not take to long to find this page, ...


5

Documentation is now available to enable network boot from the wired network connection for the Raspberry Pi3. Program USB Boot Mode First, prepare the /boot directory with the latest boot files: sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade Now, enable USB boot mode with the following command: echo program_usb_boot_mode=1 | sudo ...


5

The simplest solution is to install RealVNC Viewer. You can download it from here, and it is available for Linux, MacOS and Windows. The issue is with the encryption schemes used by different VNC servers.


4

When you use crontab -e, make changes, and then save, it saves the new crontab into a temporary file, presumably does a little verification, then automatically copies the temporary file to the proper location. You seem to be describing normal crontab -e behaviour. Use crontab -l to see if your changes were properly committed.


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