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4

It seems you have an answer that addresses your question. I'm posting this as potentially "another answer" to augment @Ephemeral's answer, and because it's something that may be overlooked occasionally: If you are using Raspberry Pi and samba as a file server, perhaps the easiest and most reliable file system to use is the RPi's native ext4 filesystem. In ...


4

The parameter is : inquiry_string, if this parameter is not defined the value is empty/null then : Linux File-Stor Gadget 0414 is used (where 0x0414 is the langage).More info here After some research : (tree /sys/kernel/config/usb_gadget/mygadget when the gadget is activated) I have found an empty file named inquiry_string in functions/mass_storage.usb0/...


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Every device that conform to IEEE 802.11 must support a wireless ad hoc network. In the specification it is called independent basic service set (IBSS). The supported interface modes of your WiFi USB dongle show that it also supports it of course. So IBSS is the keyword you have to look for your ad hoc network. You are using old style deprecated Debian ...


2

Usually hardware is managed with options in /boot/config.txt. Available options can be found in /boot/overlays/README. I have searched there for .*usb.* without a match. So it seems there is no option for the kernel to disable the USB chip on boot up. You should use a systemd service to execute your command on boot up. Create a new service with: rpi ~$ sudo ...


2

Because Raspbian is based on Debian, I suggest you to create a permanent system-specific configuration file according to the definitions as given in Debian's policies (see https://www.debian.org/doc/debian-policy/ch-files.html#configuration-files). Buster has a solid configuration for systemd and udev placed in the package's library files at /lib/systemd/...


2

The answer is that inquiry_string cannot be changed when you're using g_mass_storage unless you recompile the module. But the desired outcome can be achieved with libcomposite instead. There is a working script for Pi Zero here now: Change Raspberry Pi Zero USB Gadget name from Linux File-Stor Gadget


2

As you mentioned, it's easy to do it on Windows OS, however, it's a bit different on Raspberry Pi and Linux. I have looked up guides but they all seem to mention using the pi as a DHCP server, not too sure what I want/need this. In your situation, the phone is a device that has an internet connection. Obviously, the devices/clients must connect to ...


2

For the example I use Virtual Hard Drive exFAT for simulate your external drive and I use the pi user but you can easily adapt with your own paths replacing /media/VHD.exfat.bin and /mnt/VHD.exfat/ : sudo -i USER CONF : addgroup nas adduser pi nas CREATE VIRTUAL EXFAT : apt-get install exfat-utils exfat-fuse if [ ! -f /media/VHD.exfat.bin ];then dd if=/...


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First, if your RPi works fine (you don't get undervoltage warnings), then leave your setup as it is. Don't try to repair that ain't broken. Second, it's actually not such a great idea to power down the RPi without using the "shutdown" command. So, if you're going to get a separate power supply for the RPi, consider leaving it powered at all times, even if ...


1

Yes, you can connect an XboxOne controller to a Raspberry Pi. If you want to connect over bluetooth, you will need to have a model of controller that supports bluetooth. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xbox_One_controller#Models to identify your model. If you do have bluetooth, then follow this tutorial https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/connect-xbox-one-...


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