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0

You have 3 options 1 use dd (which requires identically sized disks and copies everything) 2 use the SD Card Copier utility on the Pi (the ssd needs to be mounted on the Pi and can be slow as it does a file copy) 3 use rsync (on any Linux computer)


1

You can try to just copy the image of the source SSD to the destination SSD. The destination SSD must have at least exactly the same size than the source SSD, better a bit more to be on the save side so the image from the source will fit onto the destination. If it doesn't fit you will see it only at the end of copying after hours. Just attach both SSD to ...


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When you resize a partition using a partition manager like gparted it may be possible that it silently changes the PARTUUID of the disk. But this is used by Raspbian to address the boot- and root-partition in /boot/cmdline.txt and in /etc/fstab. You should check if the entries in these files still match the actual settings of your disk. Because of this ...


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Try recording at higher quality e.g.: arecord -D plughw:1 -c1 -r 48000 -f S32_LE -t wav -V mono -v listen-usb.wav or (which is CD quality) arecord -D sysdefault:CARD=1 -d 10 -f cd -t wav f2.wav The noise tends to go away. The man page for arecord gives more options.


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I would strongly suggest you DON'T use a variable power supply! If you do want to take the risk, and use an external supply you can power the Pi through the +5V and Gnd pins on the header; that way you can use suitable sized cables. My approach is to attach a USB2 socket to an external (non-variable) power supply and use an appropriate USB power cable. ...


2

I would honestly suggest getting a USB-C breakout board so you can test which wires are your power wires. You can get one like this one, plug the usb c on one side, while providing power to the breakout board. On the other side of the cable (where you spliced it or cut it), if you have a multimeter, you can check for GND and +V, and thus that is where you ...


1

By updating and upgrading it may have tried to update the settings it originally has with trying to boot from sd instead of the SSD, I would first take out the SD Card, plug it into a computer and add an empty file called ssh, then put it back on the Raspberry pi and boot. After it boots you should be able to ssh to the pi long enough for you to run another ...


1

To illustrate the how, I currently connect my RPI4 with a "USB-C to USB-C" cable to my MacBook Pro, providing both power and allowing OTG connectivity over that single cable. To activate OTG mode on stock Raspian Buster I applied this guide. After reboot with that config, the RPI4 shows up on MacOS as a networking device named RNDIS/Ethernet Gadget. With ...


5

As I understand your question: You have a cron job to reboot your RPi every night at 01:00; e.g. 0 1 * * * sudo reboot (#or something similar; e.g. shutdown -r now) You have a 2nd cron job to restart your app using the @reboot facility in cron; e.g. @reboot /path/to/your/flask/app If you're certain that your 01:00 reboot is being executed successfully, ...


3

USB2 OTG port is inside the USB-C connector. Yes, you will be able to use the Gadget mode drivers, as it's an upstream-facing (slave) USB port. OTG is a rather bad name here, because it means a port which can work as both upstream-facing and downstream-facing (i.e. as a host, similar to other USB ports on the RPi). Yet it's not the case: OTG ports should be ...


3

The USB-C "Power In" port doubles as a USB-OTG port (or dual-role port (DRP) in USB-C speak). Overview for the Pi 4: The OTG hardware present on previous models of Pi is still available and it has moved to a single connection on the USB-C port. The OTG hardware is intended to be used in device-only mode on Pi 4. The USB-C port is the only connector left ...


3

The OTG USB port is the USB Type C port that is also typically used to power the Raspberry Pi 4. I haven't independently verified this for myself, but if your computer provides enough power, or you get a modified cable that lets you provide more power than your computer does directly, you should be able to use the Pi in USB Gadget mode the same way you could ...


1

Yes, you can. First configure your Raspberry Pi to auto-mount USB Storage Devices (guide here). Then create a script that checks the folders under /media/ where the mounted USB stick would be. If it finds your scripts, replace the old ones with the new ones. Configure your script to run at boot by editing your /etc/rc.local (guide here)


2

I faced the same issue with Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspbian Buster, the solution for me was to modify the following file: /lib/systemd/system/systemd-udevd.service Before: PrivateMounts=yes After: PrivateMounts=no Then I rebooted and it was OK ;)


2

Using ifconfig -a displayed the interface, so the solution was to simply activate it using ifconfig wlan1 up. I should also add that this will only activate it until the next reboot - in systemd-networkd, interfaces are automatically enabled once they are configured to do something. So you should use ifconfig -a to list them and check that they are working, ...


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Please use Greg's solution. I don't know if mods wish to remove this SO.... I am currently using pmount. Removed USBMOUNT and installed it using the instructions here: https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/a/66324/68240 "thanks to the original author btw" The only extra was that I had to sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/cpmount Since it was not working at ...


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You have 2 options, (1) Disable onboard WiFi or (2) Use networkmanager instead of ifupdown. (1) is explained already as another answer by @Ingo (2) You can install networkmanager using apt install networkmanager You can follow https://askubuntu.com/questions/377687/how-do-i-connect-to-a-wifi-network-using-nmcli to connect to network. You can follow ...


4

I had a customer who was using many raspberry pi 2. Those were booting from the sd card. 2-3 years ago he started having issues with corrupted sd cards. I then decided to change the boot location from the sd card to the usb stick. The pro was that even if a usb stick failed, you wouldn't have to dismantle the machine to get access to the sd card. You just ...


1

Finally as of June 2019, the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B had been released: It comes with 2x USB 3.0, 2x USB 2.0, 2x 4K-Display support over Micro-HDMI, Gigabit Ethernet and up to 4 GB of RAM. This makes it possible to use it as a full desktop replacement if you want to. But it also powers your peripherals with USB 3 speed, as you requested. The price seems to ...


1

Why do the USB ports and Ethernet port share the same controller? Because the SoC on pi 1 to 3 doesn't have an Ethernet controller, only has a single USB controller and doesn't have any other interfaces that can easily be used for Ethernet. While Eben was able to have some influence on the BCM2835 design it was ultimately a Broadcom product and his bosses ...


43

Yes, it resolves it. “While Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ added Gigabit Ethernet connectivity, throughput on Raspberry Pi 4 is free from the single shared USB 2.0 channel to the SoC.” (https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/raspberry-pi-4-specs-benchmarks/)


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With the Raspberry Pi Zero (W) you can use OTG gadget mode. In this mode you are able to emulate a mini USB connection as ethernet interface so you can use it as regular network connection that also is usable by VNC. How to setup gadget mode look at Raspberry Pi Zero OTG Mode.


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