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15

I have the same setup as you: Cable modem -> Router (192.168.1.1) +-> Raspberry Pi (192.168.1.11) |-> iPad (DHCP) |-> PC (DHCP) `-> AppleTV (DHCP) First, I changed my network settings (/etc/network/interfaces) on the RPi to a static ...


7

From this StackOverflow answer; Ping your local gateway; #!/bin/bash ping -q -w 1 -c 1 `ip r | grep default | cut -d ' ' -f 3` > /dev/null && echo ok || echo error


6

Info: To have a simple openvpn server installation for reference look at Simple openVPN with static keys. The first idea seeing the picture was that you confused WAN- and LAN-address. But lets look how I understand the setup so far with this example. I assume wifi and wired ethernet are bridged on the router (having the same ip address range). ...


5

You could also try and ping 8.8.8.8 to see if you are actually able to get packets out to the internet. If you are then check your DNS settings as per cat /etc/resolv.conf You would expect to see something like nameserver 8.8.8.8 Check that the DNS server in there is actually live and working. If not, edit it using something like nano, then see if it ...


5

The speed could be limited in multiple ways by including one/some bottleneck(s): WiFi itself being limited The Pi's internet connection is slow, or... limited via interface bandwidth.. or the Pi encrypting/decrypting data Servers being biased towards VPN'd traffic (if it is obviously a VPN, semi-common with Commerical VPNs). Some will straight up try and ...


5

I don't know something about AWS VPC. But because it seems to be only a routing problem I will use openVPN for reference. For routing it should not be make a big difference. I will try to be as generic as possible. An issue is that it isn't possible to add a tun interface to a linux bridge. That's exactly what the error message tells you. On openVPN there ...


4

Based on Jivings sample code and some of my own logic. #!/bin/bash STATE="error"; while [ $STATE == "error" ]; do #do a ping and check that its not a default message or change to grep for something else STATE=$(ping -q -w 1 -c 1 `ip r | grep default | cut -d ' ' -f 3` > /dev/null && echo ok || echo error) #sleep for 2 seconds and ...


4

First some general information to get an idea what to do. As you already have found there are in general two ways to configure a Virtual Private Network: a bridged setup on OSI Layer 2 and a routed setup on OSI Layer 3. Nowadays we have mainly two VPN programs that are mostly used: the modern and up comming Wireguard and meanwhile classic OpenVPN. I would ...


3

I'm also fairly new to using the RP. I ran into the same problem using a wired network connection. I edited my /etc/network/interfaces file and removed the line "iface eth0 inet dhcp" and rebooted, this gave Network Manager control of the network interface. A thorough description of Network Manager can be found here https://wiki.debian.org/NetworkManager


3

Using ssh to securely access your Raspbery Pi ssh is a client that interacts with ssh servers. OpenSSH is used on many Linux distributions to act as the server. Installing openssh-server Really, this should already be installed. sudo apt-get install openssh-server #debian sudo pacman -S openssh #archlinux Set up the client Creating Keys The client ...


3

OpenSSH is designed to be the most secure way to tunnel into your machine. When I say tunnel, I mean connect into the console via an encrypted tunnel, where you can also connect using SFTP over port 22, reroute local ports into you machine to make it look as if you were at the machine while surfing somewhere else in the world, redirect X application but in ...


3

right off the top of my head: ping your router ping google.com grep ifconfig output for valid gateway and/or valid IP address


3

It looks like changing all the ".ovpn" files instead to use ".conf" extension worked. Not sure why that is. E.g.: sudo openvpn --config /etc/openvpn/Netherlands.conf


3

Change the vpn configs to both have dev tun and change your iptables to use: *mangle :PREROUTING ACCEPT :INPUT ACCEPT :FORWARD ACCEPT :OUTPUT ACCEPT :POSTROUTING ACCEPT COMMIT *raw :PREROUTING ACCEPT :OUTPUT ACCEPT COMMIT *nat :PREROUTING ACCEPT :INPUT ACCEPT :OUTPUT ACCEPT :POSTROUTING ACCEPT -A POSTROUTING -o tun0 -j MASQUERADE COMMIT *filter :INPUT ...


3

You need a VPN client running on the Raspberry Pi to be able to connect to your work VPN. One of the most common clients is the Cisco AnyConnect client. There is a version for Linux that seems to run on the Raspberry Pi called OpenConnect as explained here. They provide the steps to install and connect so worth a try. Hope it helps.


3

Not all information about OpenVPN is logged to /var/log/syslog. You can view this information if you run the process manually. First, stop the OpenVPN service: sudo systemctl stop openvpn Then, try running OpenVPN manually: sudo openvpn --config /path/to/portugal.conf This will give you much more detailed error messages to help you diagnose the problem ...


3

Well I found the solution for me - hopefully it helps you too! Found that /var/log/openvpn.log on the RPi had the line "VERIFY ERROR: depth=0, error=CRL has expired" Searching that gave several results saying to regenerate the Certificate Revocation List, but I couldn't find how to do this with pivpn. Found this workaround and it worked: use pivpn to add a ...


3

First of all: very good explained question. But it is a sophisticated setup. And just to answer your question: yes, it is needed to setup special static routes on several devices. But it is very difficult to give advices remotely. I would need access to the network to try setup and look how it works step by step, the usual way to do the work of a network ...


3

Having a remote OpenVPN server at your home and connect to it with the RasPi is a good solution if you cannot use port forwarding on the modem. Here is an example setup for what you have described: (dhcp from RPi) bridge 10.8.0.2/24 ┌──────────┐ 10.8.0.1/24 192.168.50.2 ╱ wifi ┌───────┐ /...


3

We don't know anything about your log in commands but you can put this commands into a shell script. This is basic bash programming and you will find millions of tutorials how to do it. If you have made the script and you have tested it running from the command line then just make a systemd Unit file to start this script one time on boot up. You will also ...


2

As long as the Pi and your computer are in the same Hamachi VPN network, it will work. As an alternative, you could create a port forwarding in your router that forwards Port 22 (SSH) to the IP of your Raspberry Pi. Then you could connect directly from the outside. (I'd suggest to map SSH to a different port than 22 though, for security reasons.)


2

Single-port Tunneling Create the tunnel ssh -fND 7000 host Use the tunnel (chromium-browser example) chromium-browser --proxy-server="socks5://localhost:7000" You can look at program-specific documentation to learn how to use socks proxy with said program. Entire Network Tunneling (VPN) Using SSH man ssh gives an example of exactly this. An ssh based ...


2

You just need to turn your Raspberry Pi into a router, then the traffic to Internet will be routed by your Raspberry Pi via the VPN. You need to enable ip_fowarding in your rPi: echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward and NAT the traffic coming out of your rPi to the Internet, so if it is your eth0 connected to Internet, using iptables: iptables -t ...


2

I am not familiar with Tunnelbear, but I assume once you have set it up (should be easy if they have OpenVPN support, besides, you did not ask how to set up Tunnelbear, you asked how to share it. Add a comment if you need to know more about OpenVPN), you will have a network device (let's call it tun0) with an IP address in the VPN, and your wifi dongle (let'...


2

From experience, I know that the Raspberry Pi is powerful enough to do this, however, keep in mind that the upload speed on the side providing the stream must be high enough. If on your side (France) you only have a basic ADSL connection (e.g. from Orange), the upload speed may not be high enough to provide a usable video stream: audio will be fine, but ...


2

There is a debian-way of running OpenVPN, which is a lot easier than trying with different scripts on your own. When you install openvpn using the package manager (apt), like: sudo apt-get install openvpn It will create a /etc/openvpn and a /usr/share/doc/openvpn/examples/sample-config-files directories that are relevant to this answer. Browse the ...


2

Please stop "ugh"-ing. That is just the way it feels when you're learning. You are on the right track. The files you have found are prototype make files, and can't be used in their current form. To generate a make file, you run configure. Great. Now, configure tells you that you have a broken dependency - dcms is not installed on your system. You will have ...


2

On step 2 of the same tutorial: export EASY_RSA=”/etc/openvpn/easy-rsa” Make sure you didn't copy-pasted with the ”” but with "" like: export EASY_RSA="/etc/openvpn/easy-rsa"


2

I do not see how this could work out. (Set aside the question whether your employer would like the idea of you using the office network for personal purposes on that scale.) Why would it not work? The VPN would be just a tunnel using said terrible internet connection of yours and therefore suffer equally from packet loss and other issues. Introducing ...


2

I'm assuming you want the video to be visible from the Internet and not just within the hotel, correct? Assuming you can redirect ports internally on your home network, you could simply create a tunnel from the RPi to your home server and use port redirection with ssh (assuming you can install ssh on your home server). I've done something similar using a ...


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