3

There are answers and comments addressing the question of why this probably isn't working and why it may not be workable as you're doing it now. Regarding the part of your question about how to work around it, I think the most straightforward ways would be either: Use a proxy with a VPN connection in between Send your data from the device connected via GSM ...


3

Seems like an IoT question, but anyway. You should define your project better. Usually then we start planing a project, we first list what we expect from the system. I guess that you want your system to: Set up a server to gather data (you need a web server) Support multiple clients (clients need an ID) Save data from each client (you need a database on ...


3

There exist some projects out there to achieve something like what you want. Volumio is an example of that. Another one is RuneAudio. Depending on where you want to store your music, I would suggest you review the official documentation to understand how to connect an external storage device to the Raspberry Pi. I think the big challenges here will be to ...


2

You need to port forward to the pi's from your router. If you look in the settings there should be options related to port forwarding. Once you've set up a forward you can access it using your external IP.


2

Get plain Raspbian Lite. That's ideal for a headless web-server.


2

With most providers you will get a private IP address, usually one like 10.x.y.z. This is not reachable from the internet. That is not necessarily to stop people from doing what you want to do, but to conserve public IP addresses. If your providers assigns IPv6 addresses, you may be able to use them. Otherwise, you can use a VPN connection to some VPN ...


2

OpenVPN is the service that is allowing you to connect from outside to your local network, basically a VPN server. By connecting to it, it creates a tunnel and your traffic is routed through it, and have access to your local network through the internet. The internal services, as in this case a HTTP Server, that you have on your network are not forwarded ...


2

For April 1st 2016 I migrated the main Raspberry Pi Wordpress blog on to 8 Pi 3Bs (not the + model). https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/the-little-computer-that-could/ We were unable to migrate the (large) database backing the site onto the Pi 3 as it didn't have enough RAM to perform properly, the Raspberry Pi database is much larger than a typical Wordpress ...


2

The answer is: it depends. In general: before you move, make a backup. In that way you do not loose any data. The rest depends a bit on how different the set-up will be in the new location and what the server actually does. If it is just an in-house server, and the IP plan is the same and the SSID/PSK are the same, it should just work. If anything changes,...


1

Overall, I just want to visit (say) 192.168.0.1 (or whatever my Pi's IP is) on a local network and have my custom webpage show up. If you didn't change any config file of Nginx (I mean root section of /etc/nginx/sites-available), you can put your .html file into this location: /var/www/html In addition, read this simple documentation to configure ...


1

NODE webserver GPIO You can use node.js as a server and generate HTML with the vanilla javascript way. You can use express.js or simply XMLHttpRequest! The backend would respond to your GPIO input. So I would have the following files server.js, client.js, index.html Roughly have this sort of setup off. From backend. #Server.js var server = http....


1

I hosted my personal blog in a Raspberry Pi. you can see the stats of this litte computer in this page https://www.flopy.es/monitor/status.html In the same raspberry I have my blog, my webpage (more serious), a mail server and a personal cloud made with Nextcloud.


1

The whole problem was with the servod of the ServoBlaster. It was accidentally killed and I had to run it once again! More info here.


1

The Flask framework is fine, your code has all the right logic and procedures as far as I can tell. But the structure (architecture) and control flow is not optimized for quick response or for multiple connections. The problem is that all the control logic (with hardware interactions) happens during the request/response processing. This is fine for a ...


1

so I was able to fix the issue by increasing the update interval. I guess on raspberry Pi, the interval needs to be larger in order for the chart to update correctly. Weird, but it works. Looks like its an ongoing issue with Dash.


1

You'll need to add more info before you get any good answers. For example, is the pi currently connected to any type of network? If it is, it should be straightforward to access a video feed its producing. (check out dataplicity ). If it's not, then you'll have to create a network for it to connect to, which is a different type of problem (buy a wifi ...


1

So, RPI is a computer and yes, you can configure your RPI to be an access point (and basically serve it's own wifi network devices can connect to). This may be a good start. It would not let your RPI wifi users access internet (unless you have another adapter that connects to network to bridge it) but it would work if you wanted them to connect to this wifi ...


1

The first thing I notice is that you wrote about https, but acording to the linked site, the web(cam)server on the pi supports http, only. Maybe, you give it a try? Test if you can connect to the server from within your local network, i.e. from your mobile when connected to WiFi by visiting http://raspberrypi:8081 (Maybe, you need to use the IP address ...


1

RFC 1918 ("local") addresses such as 192.168.1.x are non-routable across the Internet, so you'd need to configure a destination NAT ("DNAT") in the router in front of your Pi to forward traffic to it. How this is achieved depends on how your router's web or CLI interface is organized. However, the operation is the same: A) Set your DNS Record to point to ...


1

I've got four Raspberries on my network, one is open to the public internet on port 80 and port 443. The other three are LAN only (running web servers on port 80 (8080 for Challenger)) but have some web pages that are available on the internet with mod_proxy. ProxyPass /RPioneer http://pioneer.local/ ProxyPassReverse /RPioneer http://pioneer.local/ ...


1

The "source zone" needs to be WAN and the destination zone needs to be LAN if you want to port forward from WAN to LAN From the image, it's clear that the "source zone" is set to LAN, which is why it's not working


1

If you want to stream, you can use MotionEye. It's easy to add to Raspberry Pi. You can use bash script from this GitHub project. It will be available from your-raspberry-ip:8888. Also, you can see and implement base configuration from This link. It contains adding static ip-address, which is important to be sure, that you can get access every time for your ...


1

You could use Youtube Live Streaming or Other Live Streaming Software like Wowza, Where global IP and port forwarding setup is not required. To start with checkout this link. https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/youtube-live-streaming-docker/ For example I am using following ffmpeg command to Stream to my Youtube channel from raspberry pi ffmpeg -re -ar 44100 ...


1

If port forwarding and using your WAN IP address is distasteful for you then you could try setting up a VPN hosted on a more secure host instead. You'd need to then connect each mobile/remote device and the Pi to the VPN in order to view the stream. For example, I've used ZeroTier for this sort of thing in the past to get SSH access to my Pi without having ...


1

This answer is mainly respected to the first revision of the question. You already have public ip addresses for all your devices. So you can address all devices direct from the internet using its public ip addresses. You only have to setup the static public ip address on the RasPis. How to do it you can look at Setup a Static IP Address. You have gotten ...


1

Option 1: Using iptables The Network Authentication Type didn't work for me. But redirecting using iptables did the trick. These commands found here iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 443 -j DNAT --to-destination localhost:80 iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p tcp --dport 80 -j DNAT --to-destination localhost:80 This redirects all requests ...


1

It looks like you can do it without using iptables by using a hostapd configuration option # Network Authentication Type # This parameter indicates what type of network authentication is used in the # network. # format: <network auth type indicator (1-octet hex str)> [redirect URL] # Network Authentication Type Indicator values: # 00 = Acceptance of ...


1

Alright, so finally I used an RTMP server and it worked pretty well. Basically, I installed an RTMP server at my cloud server. There are a bunch of ways you can do it. You can even use it inside a Docker container. Then a tricky thing is to configure the RTMP server and to integrate the RTMP and the HTTP server. A useful library I found is Watch.js. To ...


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