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18

Raspbian is managing hardware with overlays. In /boot/overlays/README you will find: Name: pi3-disable-wifi Info: Disable Pi3 onboard WiFi Load: dtoverlay=pi3-disable-wifi Params: <None> I suggest you just add dtoverlay=pi3-disable-wifi to /boot/config.txt to disable wifi. I have tested it with a Raspberry Pi 4B. It is also valid for Pi4. ...


16

Beforehand the answer: Yes, it is possible to run a RPi 4B simultaneously on dual band (WiFi 2.4GHz / 5GHz), but only with predefined interface combinations given by the hardware. If one interface is used as access point (AP) you can only use one band. First to clarify: you are talking about RPi 3B, the link you have given is talking about a RPi 3B+. This ...


16

RPi 3B only has one antenna on board, so yes, it will be shared. Sharing is managed by the adapter firmware which is closed-source. Even if done right, it will not be as good as separate antennas. You can get a USB dongle for either WiFi or BT (and use that instead of the built-in adapter) to get two separate antennas.


8

It is exactly determined what the Raspberry Pi 3B+ is able to do with its WiFi on-board device. With the command iw you can show what interface combinations are possible. Just execute $ sudo iw list | grep -A4 "valid interface combinations:" valid interface combinations: * #{ managed } <= 1, #{ P2P-device } <= 1, #{ P2P-client, ...


6

There are very few production Wifi chips that supports concurrent dual band operation. The only one I know is SF16A18, which seems not to be in a real mass production phase. This is because if you put dual band in a single chip that work concurrently, there will be signal interference problems since the TX/RX radio circuits are in like 2mm to each other on ...


5

You do not need to setup a bridge but it depends on what you want. In general there are two possibilities to connect to your internet router (or any other network gateway). You can use routing or bridging. With routing you route traffic from one separated subnet to a neighbor subnet. This means you have different ip address ranges, e.g. 192.168.1.0/24 and ...


4

To elaborate the answer from @Ingo: please consider using the link ln -s /run/systemd/resolve/stub-resolv.conf resolv.conf instead of the link to /run/systemd/resolve/resolv.conf. This enable the "integrated" DNS stub and enables things like per-interface DNS server which could be important if you use VPNs that provide their own DNS server with non-public ...


4

I found wpa_supplicant to be super confusing to work with until I figured out how to see its debug messages by running it manually. sudo killall wpa_supplicant sudo wpa_supplicant -c/etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf -iwlan0 (Add a -d onto the end to make it verbose.) Until I figured this out, it was complete voodoo. Once you get the config file ...


4

There a different ways you could achieve what you want. Method 1 – use systemd-networkd If you want to use systemd just follow step 1 and step 3 of this tutorial. Just omit this command systemctl enable wpa_supplicant@wlan0, so wpa_supplicant won't bring your interface up at boot. If you want to start it manually run sudo systemctl start wpa_supplicant@...


4

On the Raspberry Pi 4, wireless support is provided by the same Cypress CYW43455 chip as on the Pi 3 B+. A limitation of this chip is that it cannot do Real Simultaneous Dual Band (RSDB). You could add a USB wifi module, to have two devices, each on a different band.


4

Try this tutorial: Start with a clean install of the latest release of Raspbian (currently Buster). Raspbian Buster Lite is recommended. Update Raspbian, including the kernel and firmware, followed by a reboot: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade sudo reboot Set the WiFi country in raspi-config’s Localisation Options: sudo raspi-config If you ...


4

Did you make the wpa_supplicant file on Windows? Because, from the error messages, it looks as if it was it was saved as "rtf" and not as plain text. And if that's what happened, the pi will barf on it. Rtf files have lots of formatting information embedded in them which is no use at all for linux configuration. Try writing the file on your windows machine ...


4

What you have purchased isn't only an antenna to replace the built-in antenna (I don't believe that's possible), it is a complete new WiFi transmitter/receiver that can be used in addition to the built-in WiFi. If you do not need the built-in WiFi so just don't configure/use it. You can also completely disable it by adding this option to /boot/config.txt: ...


4

It is easy to select the frequencies you want to use. wpa_supplicant knows an option freq_list. Just add this line to your /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf: freq_list=2412 2417 2422 2427 2432 2437 2442 2447 2452 2457 2462 2467 2472 Then your WiFi will only connect to this frequencies. For some more information and other frequencies you can look at ...


3

According to Raspberry Pi Forums: RPi3 wlan0 doesn't change with predictable names: On the Pi only USB devices (like the ehternet adapter) use the predictable names The wifi adapter uses SDIO and apparently there's no mechanism for predictable names using that channel. So predictible interface names will never work with the onboard wifi device. ...


3

Some years later I have found new possibilities using systemd-networkd to create a WiFi router/repeater. The built-in WiFi device of a Raspberry Pi is capable to create an access point together with a client connection simultaneously as uplink to another WiFi internet router. How to do it you can look at Access point as WiFi router/repeater, optional with ...


3

Create /etc/modprobe.d/brcm-blacklist.conf with the following content: blacklist brcmfmac blacklist brcmutil Reboot, and WiFi should be disabled. You may find errors in the system log depending on what method you are using to configure the network. You can choose to correct those, or not, of course.


3

Use rfkill block wifi and reboot to disable and rfkill unblock wifi and reboot to enable it again.


3

The Tutorial you used is not up to date as it was written in 2013 and seems to be written for normal Ubuntu not Ubuntu Core. I never used Ubuntu Core but they seem to use systemd-networkd: By default network management on Ubuntu Core is handled by systemd's networkd and netplan. While NetworkManager has some support to handle netplan configuration ...


3

This is a typical use case for dynamic failover. This will configure both interfaces eth0 and wlan0 and use one primary interface that you can define. if this connection fails it will automatically use the other interface as fallback. How to setup this you can look at Howto migrate from networking to systemd-networkd with dynamic failover.


3

The capturing is a job for tcpdump. As you have a bridge, you can capture on either side (eth0 or wlan0), but I would recommend the side where the device you want to monitor is attached. If you have additional devices, you will want to filter. You can use either the MAC address or the IP address. You can also omit the filter to capture everything. tcpdump -...


3

If the w3m text browser does not work you can try to use the classic text browser lynx. It is also available from the Raspbian repository. You can also use scripting for login. I have done it with curl but it has taken me some days of development. You have to analyze the HTML source pages from the login page to GET and PUT the right responses for username ...


3

Check out this test of RPi performance w.r.t various network interfaces. Built-in WiFi on an RPi 3 is capped at 36 Mbps, and a USB dongle is capped at about 80Mbps in ideal conditions. At 10 meters distance, those numbers drop to 32 and 64 Mbps respectively. After you factor in overhead from two interfaces running simultaneously, routing performance losses, ...


3

You could always just plug the pi into the USB-C port and SSH in that way. The USB-C can be used to turn the Pi4 into an ethernet device, I've written up instructions on how to set it up here: https://www.hardill.me.uk/wordpress/2019/11/02/pi4-usb-c-gadget/


3

You have many questions and as you see there are many answers. Btw. you cannot bridge a WiFi client connection. It is not supported by the on board WiFi chip. For further information about this issue you can look at Raspberry Pi WiFi to Ethernet Bridge for a server?. If you like to look at handmade solutions for Raspberry Pi you can look for Access Point ...


3

ifconfig has been removed, in favor of ip: https://unix.stackexchange.com/a/145449/361960 Ubuntu Server is different from Ubuntu Desktop: Ubuntu Server uses Netplan to manage the network connections. Here's a guide on how to connect to WiFi using Netplan: https://tttapa.github.io/Pages/Raspberry-Pi/Installation+Setup/WiFi-Setup.html I've never tried ...


3

I suppose you are using Raspbian. With my RasPis I have found that they tend to connect first to the 2.4 GHz band if both bands available. So first you should check if the 5 GHz band is seen by your RasPi. Execute this command. rpi ~$ sudo iw wlan0 scan | grep -A5 'freq: 5' It should give you at least one (ore more) outputs like this: freq: 5300 beacon ...


3

To be able to setup Wifi on Raspberry Pi 4 B+ 4GB on Ubuntu server 18 TLS, you first need to get the name of the wifi card by showing physical components using the following command: $ sudo lshw in my case it was wlan0 Then navigate to /etc/netplan/ using the cd command the hit Enter $ cd /etc/netplan/ use the command lsto list the files and ...


3

Sniffing other WiFi networks you are not associated must be supported by the WiFi chip, called monitor mode. If you look at the chip configuration on the RasPi with: rpi ~$ iw list Wiphy phy0 --- snip --- Supported interface modes: * IBSS * managed * AP * P2P-client * P2P-GO * ...


3

I did something similar. Now this isn't a bridge because it's using NAT, but you mentioned NAT so I think you really just want an AP Client Router. You could also genuinely route across the Pi just by binding a network to each side and giving it a route to use (like a default) after enabling IP forwarding. But that tends to give people a harder time to do ...


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