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291

If you want to preserve all of the data, you will probably have to create a disk image. Furthermore, Windows cannot recognize typical Linux filesystems, so you probably won't even be able to see your files, when you plug in your SD card. Creating a disk image will preserve not only files but also the filesystem structure and when you decide to flash your ...


153

If you are running Linux then you can use the dd command to make a full backup of the image: dd if=/dev/sdx of=/path/to/image or for compression: dd if=/dev/sdx | gzip > /path/to/image.gz Where sdx is your SD card. To restore the backup, you reverse the commands: dd if=/path/to/image of=/dev/sdx or when compressed: gzip -dc /path/to/image.gz | dd ...


33

I found a rare gem of a tutorial while trying to find updates for the RISC OS distribution for the RPi. It goes in-depth on how to emulate the RPi in Windows using QEMU. The tutorial is also generous enough to provide a link to the Win32 binary for QEMU. I plan on following this tutorial myself when I find the time.


33

No. At this point in time, Windows cannot be installed on the Raspberry Pi. Windows is designed for the x86 and x86-64 architectures (32 and 64 bit architecture respectively). The RPi has an ARM architecture, which is incompatible. Windows 10 Microsoft have announced that Windows 10 will ship a version that supports Raspberry Pi 2.


30

Besides those block-level backups, there are two common approaches to deal with the sources: to archive it continuously (1), or to use the revision control system (2). We are going to use the command-line (any local terminal or SSH connection to a Raspberry Pi machine), right? 1. Archive cd ~/projects tar czvf your-raspberry-project-top-level-dir-v1.0.tgz ...


28

On the Mac you don't want to be using /dev/diskn. You should use /dev/rdiskn instead, where n is the number the OS uses to identify your SD card. This decreases the time required to copy by a huge amount. So for the optimal backup process on a Mac, I would recommend doing the following: Run diskutil list, and find the disk corresponding to your Raspberry ...


25

You can run this command from your Linux PC with lots of space: ssh root@raspberrypi gzip -c /dev/mmcblk0 > img.gz As a prerequisite you'll need to have generated .ssh keys and copied the id_XXX.pub over to /root/.ssh/authorized_keys. It's possible to have issues with the file system since it's a live backup, but if your Raspberry Pi isn't real busy it ...


19

No, it won't run on Pi Zero. It's because of the hardware. The Pi zero and the first-generation Pis (BCM2835) use ARMv6. The Pi2 (BCM2836) uses ARMv7. Windows 10 IoT Core needs ARMv7. If I'm going to explain it to a layman, I'll say "The CPU is different".


19

How To Geek has a good article that covers this issue. In a nutshell .local domains are self-reported by each host (via Multicast DNS), and other machines on the network have to listen for them. Windows comes with such a service (LLMNR) however it's non-standard and therefore doesn't work terribly well. Instead you should install Apple's Bonjour service (...


18

If you are using Windows: Download Win32 Disk Imager. Create the file path you wish to use to save your image. (I use C:\RasPi_Bkp) Run Win32 Disk Imager Browse to your backup file path spot, and type a file name. Click save Make sure the device shown in the drop down to the right of your file path is the one you want to back up. Click "Read" Wait.


15

The answer is no. The Raspberry Pi is powered by an ARM processor, and there is no ARM Windows version


15

No, Windows 10 IoT requires the Pi 2's ARM 7 multicore chip (BCM 2836).


14

Bochs can emulate x86. "thekeywordgeek" already beat me to it and has no trouble running any applications compared to DOSBox. DOSBox has a limit of 64 MB. It can run Windows 95 but it's unusable. After booting ,I can't even open start menu or explorer. My dosbox.conf memsize=64 .. [autoexec] mount c ~ c: imgmount a w95.img boot w95.img Qemu might be a ...


12

There is a very nice raspberry pi forum posting about "Emulating Raspberry Pi in Windows the easy way". Somebody all ready did all the work to make raspberry pi emulation in Windows as simple as possible. The instructions are download a zip from sourceforge Unzip the file when it finishes downloading. Inside the folder you should find a run.bat file which ...


12

try reversing the slashes and pointing to the root mnt folder sudo mount -t cifs -o username=USERNAME,password=PASSWORD //192.168.2.12/TestShare /mnt/ if your password or username contains special characters try simplifying them.


11

Windows 8 will have an ARM version known as "WinRT" so the question isn't quite as outlandish as it might seem. But it RasPi uses an earlier ARM version than that targeted by WinRT (technologically the RaspPi isn't anywhere leading edge - one reason for the price), so it will not run WinRT. Also even if the ARM architectures matched, I suspect WinRT would ...


11

TL;DR Yes it is possible to virtualize Windows XP on an ARM device such as Raspberry Pi. For anyone saying that this isn't possible needs to re-evaluate what "possible" means. Just because it hasn't been done yet (which it has), it's not appropriate to say it's impossible. In fact, it's generally never a good idea to claim something as impossible. That ...


11

There is no requirement to use the tool provided by the SD Association. Formatting the card in Windows using the Windows formatter may also work. However, there is a strong recommendation to use the tool. At least for SD, SDHC and/or SDXC cards. Different OSes and different formatting tools may have varying ideas about how to format an SD-card, many of ...


9

If your programs are all in the pi userid, there's really no reason to back up the entire filesystem, as is being suggested. what I do is to just back up the single id. I run the command: tar -czf pi.tgz * from pi's home directory, which creates the file pi.tgz, containing all the files and directories contained there (excluding hidden files). I then scp ...


9

Under Windows, all you will be able to see is the /boot partition, which is in the MS-DOS VFAT format. Raspbian uses a different file system format for its system files. Here's the (edited) output of df -h on my Raspberry Pi: Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on rootfs 30G 13G 15G 47% / /dev/root 30G 13G 15G 47% / /dev/...


9

How I did it INSTALLING NFS http://technonstop.com/tutorial-setup-nfs-server-windows Followed the instructions from several websites. 1) Firstly, Grab the "Services for unix for windows" from : http://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/download/details.aspx?id=274 2) Do a custom install, selecting only NFS -> Server for NFS Authentication tools for NFS -> User ...


9

You couldn't directly run Windows XP but you might be able to put it through an emulator. The only problem is that it would really slow.


9

Raspberry changed something since November 2016 here is the noob instruction to get this problem fixed sudo su raspi-config 1) Choose first 'update' 2) In advanced options -> expand_root file system 3) interfacing options -> ssh [enable] 4) change_locale [your country-UTF8] and if you still here, it's good to change the timezone as well 5) ...


9

If you are just looking to test the whole code and not worry about the actual pins (as windows machines don't have GPIO), then you can fake it. First, in your main python source directory, create a directory named "RPi". In that folder, put an empty text file named __init__.py. This lets python know the folder "RPi" is a package. Also in that folder put a ...


8

I run Raspbian and use dd and cron to do automated backups of my SD card to my external USB drive. It is a really simple solution. It runs once a week at 2 am on a Monday morning and makes an image of the SD card. I wrote a script which shuts down services such as lighttpd and cron, to minimise the risk of the SD card being written to in the middle of ...


8

A couple of things to try: Are you able to ping the Raspberry Pi from the windows machine, open a command prompt and enter ping 192.168.0.198 (but with the IP address you are using for SSH), if you get replies the connection is good, if not there is a networking problem preventing SSH working Did you set-up SSH using raspi-config, or did you set it up ...


8

I chose x64 for phone Nope. The pi is not an x86-64 machine. Microsoft has not released a version for the pi yet, but has expressed the intention of doing so. [Later: They have now, follow that same link.] In other words, you will just have to wait. Note there will likely not be a GUI desktop; it will be some sort of headless "embedded" OS.


7

Nope, because Windows isn't compiled for ARM (and not being open source, you can't do it yourself.) Yes, Windows 8 is apparently going to have an ARM version, though I seriously doubt it will work for a few main reasons: Drivers for all the components would have to be written, licensed and released I seriously doubt Windows 8 will run at all with 256MB RAM ...


7

Alternatively, use DiskInternals' Freeware Linux Reader for Windows (as I was unable to figure out how to mount .img files with Paragon's ExtFS for Windows).


7

The official RPF Dongle uses the Broadcom BCM43143 Chipset. The official dongle will work. If you don't have the official dongle but your dongle is based on the Broadcom BCM43143 chipset it might work. If it is based on anything else it will not work.


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