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as the title says, every single terminal window I open looks like this:

bash: lias: command not found pi@raspberrypi:~ $

I know it's not a big deal, it does not hinder anything, but it's annoying nonetheless. Do any of you have a clue how I can fix this? I appreciate any and all help here.

I'm using an RPi4 with the latest version of Buster installed.

Edit: here's the output of cat .bashrc

# ~/.bashrc: executed by bash(1) for non-login shells.
# see /usr/share/doc/bash/examples/startup-files (in the package bash-doc)
# for examples
lias python3='python3.8'

# If not running interactively, don't do anything
case $- in
    *i*) ;;
      *) return;;
esac

# don't put duplicate lines or lines starting with space in the history.
# See bash(1) for more options
HISTCONTROL=ignoreboth

# append to the history file, don't overwrite it
shopt -s histappend

# for setting history length see HISTSIZE and HISTFILESIZE in bash(1)
HISTSIZE=1000
HISTFILESIZE=2000

# check the window size after each command and, if necessary,
# update the values of LINES and COLUMNS.
shopt -s checkwinsize

# If set, the pattern "**" used in a pathname expansion context will
# match all files and zero or more directories and subdirectories.
#shopt -s globstar

# make less more friendly for non-text input files, see lesspipe(1)
#[ -x /usr/bin/lesspipe ] && eval "$(SHELL=/bin/sh lesspipe)"

# set variable identifying the chroot you work in (used in the prompt below)
if [ -z "${debian_chroot:-}" ] && [ -r /etc/debian_chroot ]; then
    debian_chroot=$(cat /etc/debian_chroot)
fi

# set a fancy prompt (non-color, unless we know we "want" color)
case "$TERM" in
    xterm-color|*-256color) color_prompt=yes;;
esac

# uncomment for a colored prompt, if the terminal has the capability; turned
# off by default to not distract the user: the focus in a terminal window
# should be on the output of commands, not on the prompt
force_color_prompt=yes

if [ -n "$force_color_prompt" ]; then
    if [ -x /usr/bin/tput ] && tput setaf 1 >&/dev/null; then
    # We have color support; assume it's compliant with Ecma-48
    # (ISO/IEC-6429). (Lack of such support is extremely rare, and such
    # a case would tend to support setf rather than setaf.)
    color_prompt=yes
    else
    color_prompt=
    fi
fi

if [ "$color_prompt" = yes ]; then
    PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w \$\[\033[00m\] '
else
    PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w\$ '
fi
unset color_prompt force_color_prompt

# If this is an xterm set the title to user@host:dir
case "$TERM" in
xterm*|rxvt*)
    PS1="\[\e]0;${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h: \w\a\]$PS1"
    ;;
*)
    ;;
esac

# enable color support of ls and also add handy aliases
if [ -x /usr/bin/dircolors ]; then
    test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"
    alias ls='ls --color=auto'
    #alias dir='dir --color=auto'
    #alias vdir='vdir --color=auto'

    alias grep='grep --color=auto'
    alias fgrep='fgrep --color=auto'
    alias egrep='egrep --color=auto'
fi

# colored GCC warnings and errors
#export GCC_COLORS='error=01;31:warning=01;35:note=01;36:caret=01;32:locus=01:quote=01'

# some more ls aliases
#alias ll='ls -l'
#alias la='ls -A'
#alias l='ls -CF'

# Alias definitions.
# You may want to put all your additions into a separate file like
# ~/.bash_aliases, instead of adding them here directly.
# See /usr/share/doc/bash-doc/examples in the bash-doc package.

if [ -f ~/.bash_aliases ]; then
    . ~/.bash_aliases
fi

# enable programmable completion features (you don't need to enable
# this, if it's already enabled in /etc/bash.bashrc and /etc/profile
# sources /etc/bash.bashrc).
if ! shopt -oq posix; then
  if [ -f /usr/share/bash-completion/bash_completion ]; then
    . /usr/share/bash-completion/bash_completion
  elif [ -f /etc/bash_completion ]; then
    . /etc/bash_completion
  fi
fi
alias python=/usr/local/bin/python3.8
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  • Include the output of cat .bashrc in your Question. These are other possibilities, but this is most likely. – Milliways Mar 26 at 1:45
  • 3
    Looks like it's missing an a from an alias being set. – ben_nuttall Mar 26 at 1:46
  • Thank you guys for the quick response, added. Is it this piece? lias python3='python3.8'? If so what file is this looking at so I can change that? Is there a sudoedit _____ for this? – Dylan Sinclair Mar 26 at 1:53
  • Figured it out, thank you for pointing me in the right direction! – Dylan Sinclair Mar 26 at 1:57
1

The line

lias python3='python3.8'

has a typographic error.

You appear to have an additional entry,

alias python=/usr/local/bin/python3.8

but either is a poor approach to setting the default python version.

Setting python to default to python3 violates the standard and is likely to break other things.

The default python3 on Raspbian-Buster is 3.7.3-1 and is already installed.

There is NO later version in the repository, and it would NOT have installed in /usr/local/bin

I might add that there is no reason to install the latest - there is virtually no difference, and certainly not any that anyone who "didn't know anything about Python" would notice.

PS the normal $PATH on Raspbian is

/home/pi/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/local/games:/usr/games

Thus /usr/local/bin/python3.8 would be executed in preference to /usr/bin/python3 which is a symlink -> python3.7

There is thus no need to set alias (or any other method).

  • 1
    Thank you very much for the help. I just got a raspberry pi on Friday and over the weekend set up vnc, mysql, and a whole bunch of connectors and packages related to that. I didn't know anything about this stuff (or anything about Python) before Friday. Any quick recommendations of what I should do instead? – Dylan Sinclair Mar 26 at 2:00
  • 2
    Why (and how) did you install python3.8? – Milliways Mar 26 at 2:00
  • 1
    As to why, because as far as I'm aware it's the latest version. I believe I would have just installed it via sudo apt-get install python3 – Dylan Sinclair Mar 26 at 2:05
  • 1
    If it makes any difference, when I run python --version and python3 --version I get Python 2.7.16 and Python 3.8.2 now that I cleaned up .bashrc – Dylan Sinclair Mar 26 at 2:11
  • apt-get install python3 installs python 3.7.3 – Jaromanda X Mar 26 at 9:21

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