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32

The firmware is closed-source proprietary code programmed into the SoC (System on a Chip) processor, which cannot be modified. Upon power-up the firmware will initiate a bootloader on the SD card. I do not believe that any other services are provided through the SoC firmware, so it is not really a "BIOS" (Basic Input/Output System) per se. After this ...


24

At a command prompt, type cat /proc/cpuinfo to view CPU information. The ARM11 chips use version 6 of the ARM instruction set, ARMv6. More recent chips from the ARM Cortex range like the Cortex A7, A8 etc all use the ARMv7 instruction set. All Pi boards are shipped with an ARM11. The options on the second line look like a better fit for building ...


19

Depends on how much assembler you want to write. If you want to write only small snippets embedded in C code, than gcc is indeed what you are looking for. Examples of how to use the asm directive in C see inline asm reference at: ARM GCC Inline Assembler Cookbook If on the other hand you want to write more than just small snippets than you'll be better of ...


16

@TevoD is almost right in what he wrote in his answer - RaspberryPi is using closed source firmware binary as a bootloader. The current version can be found here. The two files that makes the firmware are bootcode.bin (2nd stage bootloader) and start.elf (GPU "firmware"). What is interesting and quite unique to RaspberryPi is that it starts from GPU (...


15

Raspberry Pi has never maintained that the Pi is open source. There are many parts of it, especially the software, which are open source, but not everything is. There has been criticism of the Pi for having parts which are closed source, however given that the aim of the Pi is education of children, open sourcing everything is not seen as a priority.


14

You seem to have a misunderstanding about how software is compiled. Linux is essentially a giant piece of software written in the C programming language. One of the primary benefits of writing software in a higher level language than assembly is that it allows for software to be written independently from the CPU's architecture. The same code (written in ...


14

The community is in the progress of making dotnet core working on ARM. Samsung recently joined the dotnet foundation to (mostly) do work for ARM. .NET is a great technology that dramatically boosts developer productivity. Samsung has been contributing to .NET Core on GitHub – especially in the area of ARM support – and we are looking forward to ...


12

You can use Python's os module to obtain this information through uname: import os os.uname() This function should provide platform and other information on most Linux or Unix-like distributions. From the Python documentation: os.uname() Return a 5-tuple containing information identifying the current operating system. The tuple contains five ...


12

GCC is a cross-platform compiler; I'd guess it is used on more architectures than any other contemporary compiler -- not just x86_64 (which is more. The linux kernel is similarly highly portable, which is a major reason for its success and why it is used on the armv6j pre-2 pis, and for that matter the armv7 pi 2's. The foundation of the GNU userspace on ...


12

I'm amazed that the almighty Google doesn't have a ready answer to the question "what is VCHIQ?" I'm a longtime kernel geek and not a Broadcom employee, nor am I BCM283* expert, but here's what I've found for (maybe) posterity: From the Raspberry Pi kernel branch: Kernel to VideoCore communication interface for the BCM2708 family of products. What's ...


12

All images available at https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspbian/ are compatible with all Pi models. Of course, this may change in the future


9

I found this post which details how to compile xmame for the Pi. I'm not sure how this will run. Are you planning on outputting sound and video via HDMI? While you wait for your Pi you can always download a VirtualBox Image so that you can emulate it and see how things will run.


8

kernel.img file When using Linux kernel, kernel.img file is just a renamed linux/arch/arm/boot/Image. It should also be possible (or at least it was possible last time I checked) to use compressed version of this file - zImage. It can contain integrated initramfs (ramdisk) but it is not required. For example, stock kernel.img file does not contain ...


8

I think others here have done a good job answering: Is it even worth switching from ARMv7 to ARMv8 Various software cited to require ARMv8 includes CockroachDB, MongoDB (if accessing >2 GB), the Dolphin emulator, and OpenMW. However, likewise you'll lose out on other features or programs that may be less-supported with a 64-bit kernel (e.g. gaming with ...


7

Yes, in fact all of the software from Raspbian except the kernel falls into this category (i.e., the entire userland). It's compiled for ARMv6 so it works on all models, because ARMv7 is backward compatible. As to whether that amounts to sub-optimal performance on the Pi 2, you would have to test to find out. I believe in some cases it certainly does, but ...


7

Is it even worth switching from ARMv7 to ARMv8? Not unless you are running a kernel and OS userland compiled for ARMv8; there are at least a few such things for the Pi 3 around, including Fedora. For some hints about why there still isn't a special version of Raspbian, see here: Raspbian moving to 64-bit mode Otherwise, I think the only relevance is in ...


6

Berryconda is the way to go! See https://github.com/jjhelmus/berryconda


5

I found you can get the Pi model and version from: /sys/firmware/devicetree/base/model Ex: Raspberry Pi 3 Model B Rev 1.2 I have a shell script to look for this and return the contents if it exists. An OS call to read the file if it exists should set you right. The premise is, if it doesn't exist, its definitely not a RPi. If it does, then inspect the ...


5

Here is the relevant information in that tutorial: Addresses in computers are just numbers, and so the number 0x20200000 happens to be the address of the GPIO controller. This is just a design decision taken by the manufacturers, they could have used any other address (providing it didn't conflict with anything else). I know this address only ...


5

My understanding is that Linux (Raspbian, Debian, Ubuntu, etc.) is compiled via gcc True which uses the x86_64 instruction set. It isn't restricted to that, gcc itself can be compiled on many architectures and on any of them it can be run to target (produce executables for) many other different architectures (including many different instruction sets) ...


5

It is possible to compile x86_64 code on the Raspberry Pi, and i have just built a cross-compile toolchain on my Pi 2 (with more than 27 hrs of compilation and some hours of bug fixing). You can directly download it from here: Link (GCC 4.9.3, built with GCC 4.9.2-10 on Raspbian JESSIE (2015-Nov-21) and crosstool-ng 1.22.0) Here's how i built my toolchain ...


5

Mono works absolutely fine on a Pi - we already have a tag and a few dozen questions on the topic. Getting started should be as straightforward as punching in: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install mono-complete


5

The primary target of the Ubuntu arm-linux-gnueabi cross compiler is to compile for a different architecture of the same Ubuntu release leveraging the Debian/Ubuntu multiarch capabilities. Example: You compile on Ubuntu 16.04 amd64 for Ubuntu 16.04 armel. If you would like to do a similar thing for Raspbian I suggest the following approach: On your Ubuntu ...


4

I started my adventure with ARM assembly code not too long ago myself and here are my resources: Cambridge University published a very decent set of tutorials here: Baking Pi. It includes a template for your own OS, complete code examples for every tutorial and all instructions on how to build and run your code. Additionally, this hefty book should cover ...


4

Not sure where you got the impression that the Pi (or anything else for that matter) is 'open source HARDWARE' .. For sure it's not .. it does however run Open Source Software on a SOC that includes a GPU with micro-code which is a closed source 'blob' (it has to be for two very good reasons - (1) you can perform H264, MPEG and VC1 video decode on the GPU (...


4

Eventually I've used a compiled version (node.js v12.02) by Conor O'Neill that applied a patch: http://conoroneill.net/download-compiled-version-of-nodejs-0121-stable-for-raspberry-pi-here The steps I've made: wget http://conoroneill.net.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/node-v0.12.2-linux-arm-pi.tar.gz tar -zxvf node-v0.12.2-linux-arm-pi.tar.gz ...


4

The .NET class of languages are all currently supported on the Raspberry Pi 2 if you use Windows 10 IOT as your operating system. The IOT version of the OS is a little different from standard Windows. It's designed to be a headless device. As such, it will not have a display or a traditional desktop. If you want to use .NET on Raspbian, you can try a ...


3

I've compiled Advmame for the Raspberry Pi, but it is just that little bit too slow to enjoy the classic games on...


3

I'm not solving all your problems, but you can use GPIO to activate LEDs and recieve input from buttons. There is a good video about using GPIO here, and a google search should help. You could try getting a breadboard here (very cheap!), or again, google will do no end of good. I actually have these two LED kits, which are nice for their variation of ...


3

Although I am quite comfortable with command line interface, I could not resist the convenience of GUI. A while ago, I discovered that I could use CodeBlocks IDE to develop ARM assembly language programs in a Raspberry Pi. So I wrote a tutorial and appended it to the Raspberry Pi assembly programming tutorial I wrote for the Mazidi ARM Assembly book website: ...


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