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2

I did something similar. Now this isn't a bridge because it's using NAT, but you mentioned NAT so I think you really just want an AP Client Router. You could also genuinely route across the Pi just by binding a network to each side and giving it a route to use (like a default) after enabling IP forwarding. But that tends to give people a harder time to do ...


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I haven't completely understood what you have done, but in respect to your own answer it is in general possible to run 32 bit programs on a RasPi running a 32 bit or a 64 bit kernel. You cannot run a 64 bit program on a 32 bit kernel, which is default. For this you must use a 64 bit kernel. Raspbian Buster has a precompiled 64 bit kernel available together ...


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I can confirm that I also haven't had any problem powering a low profile 5V Noctua 40mm x 10mm fan from the 5V and GND pins. These pins are always on. This is on a Raspberry Pi 3B+ used as an Octoprint server. The power drain is minimal.


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That panel is a resistive touch screen which needs analog inputs. Since the Rpi does not have analog inputs you cannot use it directly. If you really want to use it a a keyboard I would use an a microcontroller to interface with the touch screen and then have the microcontroller emulate a USB keyboard. The microcontroller would read the touch sensor, ...


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The problem with a Raspberry Pi is, that it cannot bridge a client connection on interface wlan0 to a remote hotspot. This needs hardware support on the WiFi chip, which isn't available. But there is a workaround to emulate a real OSI layer 2 bridge using proxy arp. This is not a real bridge but it behave like one. How to setup it you can look at Workaround ...


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By creating that post, I noticed that aarch64 is the crucial part. I need aarch64-linux-gnu-g++ for compilation and the resulting image will run directly. It seems that - unlike Windows - 32bit programs cannot be run on a 64bit architecture.


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If you want a really silent fan, I suggest powering a regular fan with a lower voltage. The safest bet is to get a 5V fan and try it with 3.3V: it will almost certainly rotate at roughly half the RPM, which reduces the noise a lot. If it doesn't work, or the airflow is not sufficient, you can still power it with 5V. Another option (that I personally use) is ...


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