17

The accepted answer is out of date. The official camera is available from most channels that sell the Raspberry Pi. I don't believe that there are any other cameras working with that interface though (yet!) However some people have used additional lenses or removed the IR filter for their special purposes/needs.


9

Late answer, but recently experienced it. I noticed the interface is down. Yours is down too. Running sudo hciconfig hci0 up on an updated firmware solved my problem. Not sure how that happened, as the people from this raspberrypi.org thread insists on downgrading.


8

I have answered a similar question here: Making Raspberry Pi Bluetooth slave I will also paste the same answer below for reference. You need to activate the ISCAN service to achieve this: sudo hciconfig hci0 piscan after this, when you execute sudo hciconfig -a, you should see this line: UP RUNNING PSCAN ISCAN After that, just run bluez-simple-agent ...


7

If you plugged it in to pins 4(red) and 6 (black) and it's not working the fan is likely faulty. Make sure you can spin the fan freely. Use a volt meter to verify. Reverce the plug. If it's faulty don't bother replacing it until the CPU gets over 85 degrees Celsius. cat /sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0/temp


6

You have a couple of options: Female to male jumper wires (for use with a breadboard), Alternatively you can add a set of female headers to the Pi and use the more common male to male jumper wires, You can use a floppy drive ribbon cable (because the cable has more pins than the Pi it will hang over the edge and prevent it from being used with a case/...


6

Yes, I have done this sort of thing several times and I am no electronics expert. You have to be quite sure that you have the polarity right and that everything is fully insulated. I buy two heat shrink tubes, one larger and one smaller. Then I cut off both barrel connectors making sure that the one you intend to use has enough wire to work with. Now ...


6

I'd like to install openelec on my pi2, after I have the pi the way I like it can i unplug my peripherals and have it boot up without kb/mouse Yes.


5

There is BrickPi+ helps you connect LEGO sensors and motors to the Raspberry Pi and replaces the MINDSTORMS Brick. http://www.dexterindustries.com/brickpi/


5

Click image to find out more about uElastix. After you have set it up the way you love you can consider one of these amazing devices from linksys/cisco. (That wont cost you hundreds and hundreds!) Linksys PAP2 A really really cheap solution to enable your existing home phones to use VoiP instead- If you want to recieve phone calls on your existing number, ...


5

As I read your question, you need to power the Coin Acceptor using 12v, and reading the output using your RPi. To power the Coin Acceptor it is best you use an external power supply, as the coil in the acceptor might reset the RPi as it draws a relative large ammount of current when it operates. Find a 12v power supply, connect - on the PSU to a common ...


5

A solid state relay (see Wikipedia) with appropriate power ratings should do the trick. They provide increased lifetime and do not wear off as there are no moving parts. Selection according to your needs (power, voltage, current) should be pretty much straight forward. Switching time should be no issue for the mentioned application and neither should the ...


5

Even though the USB port of the RPi is technically an On-the-go (OTG) chip that should support both a reduced set of host and client functionality (and could therefore play the role of an USB slave such as an HID) the B/B+ type of the RPi does not support the device mode. That is related to the included USB hub and the fact that the ethernet is tunneled ...


5

Depending on the fan, it could also be potentially dangerous for the Raspberry Pi the way you have it connected. If you insist on powering it from the Raspberry Pi, the proper way to do it - given the resistance of the fan is large enough to limit the current it draws; otherwise include one - would be by using a transistor, as seen in the schematic I created ...


5

You only need to check the voltage. The voltage will drop if not enough current is available. Measure the voltage between pin 2 (5V) and pin 6 (ground) of the expansion header. It is safest to put male-female jumper wires on those two pins and touch the meter contacts to the female end of the jumper wires rather than the pins themselves. If all is well ...


4

Is that the Broadcom thing? If so, it does not present itself as a Bluetooth adapter your Pi can talk to as Bluetooth. Instead, it looks like a dongle which transparently translates your Bluetooth keyboard+mouse into an USB keyboard+mouse. Try the command hid2hci to switch the dongle to HCI mode. If that doesn't work, try to exchange it for a different ...


4

A simple, cheap USB "HID TEMPer" thermometer also works, and is much easier to connect for those who are yet to fiddle with UARTs or GPIO, like me. My RPi provides enough power to drive it directly from the USB port without a hub. To set this up with Raspbian Wheezy, I followed these instructions which were written for Ubuntu (disclaimer: link is for a ...


4

Per the elinux wiki, the GPIO pins are configurable to source or sink from 2mA to 16mA each, 3.3V (not 5V tolerant). They also have GPIO tutorials, one of which demonstrates driving a low power LED directly from the output with no 3.3V or 5V connection used.


4

What you want to do is possible, but how you're approaching it isn't correct In order to talk serial over a bluetooth link, you need to use rfcomm to setup a serial connection. With that in place, you then open the rfcomm /dev/ entry, and a connection is initiated over bluetooth (or an error returned). Finally, you then read and write from the rfcomm device ...


4

this is perfectly normal, especially indoors, where the reception quality is far from ideal. your GPS unit recalculates your position every time, and because of the position error, it thinks you're moving a bit back and forth, hence the non-zero speed readings. to fix this you may get an external antenna or average your coordinates over time to get more ...


4

If you need to display same image on all TV sets, the easiest way is to use "video distribution amplifier" (google it to get prices and pictures) to split the RCA video signal. In simple case of 2 TVs it's possible to use just Y-split cable, but for multiple TV installation I'd recommend dedicated hardware to significantly improve the picture quality.


4

There's no point trying to attach HDD to GPIO, since if you use USB for power anyway, it would be silly not to use data lines for data transfer. The 2.5" HDD box is about the size of Raspberry Pi box, and can be easily fitted on the top or on the bottom, additionally glued together:


4

I doubt it. If it is writing to the SD card then the card filesystem may be damaged. The most likely action is a Pi reboot. We don't know what peripherals you may attach. You would have to look at them on a case by case basis. I reckon there would be great big warning labels on such a peripheral if it was susceptible to such damage.


4

My approach to this would be to do everything I possibly could to avoid interfacing the Pi directly with the phone line. It's definitely achievable, but it sounds a lot harder than I like my spare time. Some Googling suggests that it shouldn't be too difficult or expensive to get hold of something that looks like this £16 adapter from Maplin. It accepts (I'...


3

The world of Pi and csi-2 has become a much better place since that question was asked, but if anyone comes wandering here the way I did,here's a little something: CSI2 Raspberry Camera Modules


3

The Pi's GPIO are 3V3. There is no authoritative source for voltage levels. For the likely voltage levels see http://www.mosaic-industries.com/embedded-systems/microcontroller-projects/raspberry-pi/gpio-pin-electrical-specifications A GPIO can output considerably more than 16mA. Whether it is safe to do so for any length of time I don't know. I think I ...


3

there's no way to use this module as a primary display, it's intended for being accessed through the 4D Systems C Serial Library to draw things on the screen using commands sent over a serial interface. please, check the github repository on the page you get this module from. you might be able to redirect some system output to the serial port and see it on ...


3

As @S.Spieker said it takes only #7 and #11 pin. To get physical access to other pins, you may consider using homemeade extender or female-male breadboard cables, so the shield won't cover the rest of unused pins.


3

If I where you, I would connect an iPhone to a recording device (with a 3.5 mm cable) and record the signals the app send to the device. Then it would be a simple matter of transferring the signals to the pi and play them there.


3

An easy way to do this is to buy a powerful power supply (in regards to your previous question) like this one: 5V DC 3A power supply and either cut off the barrel plug - leaving you with a + and a GND wire (which is which you can easily determine with a voltmeter or by looking at the polarity of the plug and how it's wired). You then connect the positive +5V ...


3

You haven't said how you are powering the fan. "I have a bought a fan and plugged it into my Pi" is vague. Given that it stays on I reckon it's safe to assume you have connected it to a 5V pin and a ground pin. These pins are not GPIO, they are not switchable, they are powered as long as the Pi is powered. So the answer to your question is no, there is ...


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