39

You can build a NAS using... USB Hub Sata <> USB SATA Replicator / SATA Hardware Port Multiplier This is how you can chain the multipliers to RAID, RAID'ed RAID's. You can go 4 multipliers deep and choose from a few raid options. At the Start of the Chain where the blue arrow is your combined terabytes of storage, redundant in the way you configured it ...


28

It is not possible to boot RPi from USB directly in the true sense of the word. However there's nothing to stop someone from making a mini-distro which would contain /boot and some kind of a boot manager. This could then implement booting from USB or even a PXE style environment. This could fit on a tiny SD card - 64MB cards are now available for pennies. I'...


21

From comments: This is usb powered hard disk (not external adapter), I cant mount because I cant see in the /dev, cant even see in the log if inserted or not (nothing changes in log, but when i plug in mouse or usb hub) Unfortunately, the Raspberry Pi can often not supply enough power through the USB ports to support USB powered devices. My own external ...


21

From the Raspberry Pi FAQ: You have to boot from SD but a USB HD can “take over” after the initial boot. You cannot boot without an SD card.


18

After lots of reading and frustration. First of all, make sure the normal user has read and write acces to the USB drive. The correct 'non-root' fix for having write acces to the USB drive is: Step 1: Stop transmission daemon sudo service transmission-daemon stop Step 2: Add pi to debian-transmission group sudo usermod -a -G debian-transmission pi Step ...


17

Set ownership when you mount the drive. For example if your drive that you want to mount is /dev/sda1: sudo mount -t ntfs-3g -o uid=pi,gid=pi /dev/sda1 /media/USBDRIVE/ or if later you want to change permissions of files on the drive after mount, try to add a line to /etc/fstab something like this: /dev/sda1 /media/USBDRIVE ntfs-3g auto,users,permissions ...


16

Disk drives are distinguished by their UUID(universally unique identifier). You can find the UUID of your HDs with the command ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid/ Then you must create the mount points sudo mkdir /MOUNT/POINT1 and change the permissions of them sudo chmod 775 /MOUNT/POINT1 Then you add a line to your fstab file (which is located at /etc/fstab) wich ...


14

If you're going to have a HDD that's always attached to the Pi, then you can mount the sections of your filesystem that incur the largest number of read/writes directly from it. These directories are probably the culprits: /home/ /var/ /tmp/ You are able to mount partitions on your external hard drive to these directories automatically at boot. Let's say ...


13

You could check out the Witty Pi from UUGear as a simple extension to the Raspi. Will do proper startup and shutdown of system, includes real-time clock.


13

These type of enclosed hard drives conform to the USB specification 2.0 specification, even though it's USB 3.0 it must be able to fall-back. USB 3.0 provides lots more power, but since it falls back it must conform to the USB 2.0 500 mA maximum current. The hard drive itself might use more power, but the built-in electronics will detect when to use ...


11

The problem was the way the USB disk was automonted. I mounted it manualy with mount -t ntfs-3g and it started working.


10

I'm no linux expert, but you could try this, might work. Most of this is info came from http://www.superfecta.ca/?p=44 sudo service transmission-daemon stop sudo nano /etc/init.d/transmission-daemon change USER=debian-transmission to USER=root ctrl-x Y # hit enter to overwrite sudo service transmission-daemon start I know running as root is a big linux ...


10

If you look at the Raspberry Pi Schematics, on page 3, there is a 140mA fuse in series between the 5V supply and the Vcc of each of the USB ports. 140mA is not enough to run a USB HDD.


10

Since the chip does not have SATA support. Your only option is to connect a SATA HD enclosure through the USB port.


10

It probably won't damage the RPi, but it may cause random crashes. Depends on many factors. Power supply, other periperals, cpu load etc. The main polyfuse is evil. If the current is on the high side it could trip after a few hours even if nothing else changes I don't power mine through the polyfuse anymore. Much more reliable.


8

If you dare, you can implement PCI-E x1 with six pins: SM_SCL, SM_SDA (go to I2C bus as SMBus signal), PCIE_IRQ (open drain, shared by all cards), PCIE_CLK (Derive into differential signal with external circuitry, shared by all cards), PCIE_Tx (Derive into differential externally, one per channel) and PCIE_Rx (Derive from differential signaling externally, ...


8

Now, nearly five years later after author originally asked this question, Raspberry Pi officially supports booting from USB mass storage device. However, this is supported only for Raspberry Pi 3. Here's why: Will it be possible to boot a Pi 1 or Pi 2 using MSD? Unfortunately not. The boot code is stored in the BCM2837 device only, so the ...


7

The worst part is plugging in the hard drive. The initial jolt of power needed to spin the internal discs can cause the Pi to reset. But if your is not then that is fine. When it is spinning the power consumption is stable and low, even when accessing the drive it does not go up that much. If you have a Rev2 board and a good 2Amp power supply you should ...


7

This is strictly a generic Linux question, but the answer anyway is partition UUIDs (Universally Unique Identifiers). Like the name says on the tin, when a partition is formatted, a random unique ID is generated that describes it. You can use this to mount to ensure that you always get the correct partition. The blkid command gives a list of UUIDs for ...


7

From my personal experience, WD Blue HDD (WD10JPVT/WD10JPVX with 0.55A average current) might work more or less reliably (== require about 1 reboot / month) connected directly to RPi without any powered hub. Your particular HDD requires much higher currents, so it's very unlikely you'll be able to do anything reasonable without an external power.


7

The 40 pin expansion header provides power and ground rails as well as 28 GPIOs (general purpose inputs outputs). The GPIOs are controllable IO lines and as the name suggests may be individually configured to be inputs or outputs. The inputs may be used to read sensors such as switches, ADCs, thermometers etc. The outputs may be used to control motors (DC,...


7

There are a few things that you need to do to get this to work. First, after physically connecting the drive, run dmesg to see the name of the node in /dev. You should find something like this: [ 5155.744879] usb-storage 1-1.4.3:1.0: USB Mass Storage device detected [ 5155.753654] scsi host1: usb-storage 1-1.4.3:1.0 [ 5157.013418] scsi 1:0:0:0: Direct-...


7

You are probably not doing anything wrong. It seems to me that the real issue is that the instructions, as written, don't work generically. The point at which you are apparently stuck is the chown command, but all that is intended to accomplish is to make sure that "you" (really the pi user) actually owns the folder to be shared. If you created the /...


7

This is a common problem with tons of documentation on the web. A very informative discussion I've found on (1). Be aware that this problem only belongs to a wifi client connection that you want to brigde with another wifi client connection to a remote access point (e.g. uplink to an internet router). Bridging an access point (wlan0/ap0) together with a ...


6

The default pi kernel may or may not have the right drivers built in to mount the external drive without the root filesystem,1 so the first thing you'll have to do is investigate that and if it doesn't, build a kernel that does. It's probably okay (various blog posts online imply a custom kernel is not generally needed), but this is important to note just ...


6

Based on your dmesg output, it looks like the hard drive isn't getting enough power. It's does the connection phase, and then starts the spin up process. Since this is the most energy intensive task, it makes sense that it would be the point at which the connection fails. I would suggest switching to a powered USB hub. Edit: Based on your comments: ...


6

Yes. Here's what I use: hdparm -B 127 /dev/sda hdparm -S 242 /dev/sda From the command line as the pi user you would have to add sudo there. The first line enables spin down. The second one sets it to happen after 1 hour of inactivity. This is documented in man hdparm. You may need to sudo apt install hdparm first. Beware that's the device node (sda),...


5

I believe your problem is your USB stick is formatted as NFTS or FAT, filesystems that do not support the per-user/group permissions. The solution is to reformat as ext4. If you do that, you will also have much less lag if you are using your Pi as a media center. The drivers for the Pi are much faster when you use ext4.


5

Indeed, if you can live with just the SD MS-DOS partition (/boot) where the kernel reside, you can have /root and everything else on an external device. USB memory card or a physical hard drive are fine as secondary drive. The good thing is that unless you 'dd' to the wrong location, this is a non-destructive procedure: one edit and you go back to the ...


5

If you are connecting the HD directly, keep in mind the pi USB ports don't deliver the 2.0 standard 500 mA (plus, 3.0 devices may need up to 900 mA). I.e., you probably can't use this drive directly, you will have to use a powered hub. The reason for the reboot is that there is a sudden voltage drop when you plug in the device. This is like yanking the ...


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